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How to silence an anvil

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This was originally an answer to Xavier about the ringing stand. I could not post it of course but in the middle of it I got this Idea------.

What makes the sound is a piece vibrating and transmitting the vibrations to the air. Frosty is right. The setup is a gong. The vibrating parts that emit most of the sounds from an anvil are the horn(-s) and the heel. The longer and flatter the more sound. A London style anvil is a kind of double tuning fork. If the feet are securely bolted down more of the vibrations are led into the stand and the bottom half of he fork will dampen he top half.

What you could do if you are adamant on keeping the flanges for upsetting purpose is to "bolt them down" by welding diagonal struts from the edge of the flange down to the bottom of the stand. That will prevent some of the vibrations. I do not think they need to be very strong. Pipe would be enough.

Thinking about it, I would assume that one could dampen a London pattern by wedging a near vertical bar betwen the end of the heel and the stand.-----

It is early Sunday morning and I am not yet dressed so I just rushed out to the shop half naked with an overcoat. No I did not shout heureka as Archimedes did.

Picture one is my 35kg Kohlsva London pattern that I keep for the kids. The new stump is very slightly dished in the middle so it stands stably on four feet. As soon as I got the nails in it became considerably quieter. The nails hold down the feet and transmit the vibrations into the stump.

The second picture shows the heureka idea. A piece of wood wedged in between the heel and the stump. THE RING IS GONE!

Have I reinvented the wheel??

The piece of wood was lying around in the shop and this is an experiment. For a permanent setup I would tack weld something that can hold the strut but make the occasional removal possible.

Try it out! It works!

 

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I just bent a short section of round bar just a little smaller than the pritchell hole into a flat bottomed "U" shape, and dropped it in the pritchell. My anvils overhand the stands, which are only slightly larger than the base.

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YYF you talking about the BIG ANVIL or another normal size anvil?

 

I have used a round head carriage bolt about 3 inches long in the prickle hole. Put  a couple of large finder washers and a nut near the threaded end to hold the washers on the bolt. It did kill some of the ring.

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try two smaller pieces that will wedge between the heel and anvil base and horn and anvil base in the waist area.  Hold them in place with a pipe clamp?  I usually use a bullpin in the hardy or pritchel to quiet an anvil down and call it a "mute" to the students.

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YYF you talking about the BIG ANVIL or another normal size anvil?

 

I have used a round head carriage bolt about 3 inches long in the prickle hole. Put  a couple of large finder washers and a nut near the threaded end to hold the washers on the bolt. It did kill some of the ring.

Any size anvil

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I do not think that it matters if the strut is diagonal as long as it has a good grip on the heel and the stand. The important thing is to "hold" the heel - I assume that a 2x2 wood strut wedged down to the floor would work if the stand is narrow. What I try to suggest is that you test it in a primitive way like I did and the figure out how to implement it. What I show in the picture is a quick an dirty experiment to show that the principle works.  

This post got mislaid it is an answer to Johns-

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Saw a funny one come back to our local group from the Campbell folk school. They were putting gobs of silicone all over the heel. Looked awful, but worked great.

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YYF, It is a fact that when I fixed the anvil to the stump the ringing was significantly reduced. I was surprised how well it worked but there is a logical explanation. I do not tie down my 250 pound anvil and do not think I will but it is not London pattern and  fairly silent.

Thomas, It probably works but I found that fixing the heel gave enough effect. By Bullpin, do you mean that you tied down the heel to the stand?

Of course one can tie the heel down by a bolt through the prichel hole or hardy hole down to the stand but then the hole is blocked.

Glenn, This piece of wood killed ALL the ring.

 

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As has been stated in other threads, bed the anvil down, or build up a container for about 4 inches or more of sand. Ring is gone.

 

Edited by Glenn

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Then , on the other hand:D if you stack a load of those all the way round the anvil and set fire to them ! Afterwards let it cool slowly, now your Anvil won't ring anymore! And not only will you have quietened down your Anvil you will have acquired a fine anchor.(Folks don't try this at home)

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What it gets down to is to dampen vibrations.  I don't think the piece of wood needs to touch the stand; angling it from the heel to the base of the anvil should work if it's snugged up enough to dampen the vibrations.

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Thomas, Just to show my ignorance .......How is a bull pin in the hardy or pritchel hole, any different than leaving a hot cut in place while working......?    Thanks for any explanation                  Dave

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Well my hardy sticks up over the surface of the anvil 4-5 inches and has a sharp edge; the bull pin sticks up about 1 inch and is flat on top.  The height is such that for almost all my hammers I can't make contact with it before the hammer face rebounds off the face of the anvil.

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Dave, whilst my earlier chirp was very tongue in cheek, the hotcut is very dangerous if left in place so strongly not recommended! And a simple chain wrapped around the anvil dampens sound enormously.

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Thanks........ So in my situation , with a 7/8 hardy and a 1/2 pritchel ,(100lb. A&H) The bull pin will protrude a lot, If all bull pins are created equal. Maybe not such a good idea for me.....Thanks though                  Dave  

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No. bull pins come in a wide rage of sizes because as you may imaging structural steel has a wide range of bolt sizes and one that's great doing a 1/2" hole may not be so good working 1" holes.  You could even forge one to fit your situation ...

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 Well to explain my situation, I just felt the need  to take a couple of pics......            Dave

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Edited by Dave51B
dup pics

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Of course one can tie the heel down by a bolt through the prichel hole or hardy hole down to the stand but then the hole is blocked.

 

I do believe they are not saying to run a long bolt from the hole to the stand and connect the two: you just need a bolt to hang loose. Then, when it comes time to use the hole, remove bolt and replace when done. 

 

I use a length of chain wrapped around the waist and then a link is slipped over the horn; it quiets her down a lot! 

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 Thanks Charles, I'm pretty good on noise.... with the turnbuckles on the chains and the magnet on the heel I seem Ok.         Dave 

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Try 2-3 layers of ice shield that they put in roof valleys and under starter shingles. 

A layered piece on each side (1/2 the size of your hand) of the anvil and the ringing will disappear or go to a car audio shop and try some of the silencing material they put in the trunk of cars.  (Boom boxes on wheels...LOL)

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Thomas, I agree entirely. It probably worked so well on my anvil because it is tied down to the stump. However, I could not have wedged in the piece of wood so easily if I had tried to do it against the base of the anvil. The fairly large stump I use, made it very easy

ubable to post

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