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Well it depends. On the propane forge , the size and the burners . On coal it depends on the fire mending and the quailty of the coal . Many factors play arole.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by skypiratedc10
The Gurnsey Brothers Trucking in Schylerville NY near Saratoga Springs has blacksmithing coal for $18 per 50 lbs - they also sell normal coal you can then break down yourself for around $240 per ton - I have been told the blacksmithing coal is a hit and miss in the past - but so far it is burning very well with hardly any clinkers - I'll post after the next bag if any change.


I believe it is Garnsey. 518-695-3346 by Matt in NY


After a little research and a phone call to them:

Garnsey Paul & Son
Schuylerville, NY 12871
(518) 695-3346

They're not very far from you at all. They're located on Rte.4. They told me you can't miss them. Edited by Jeff Bly

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Sam, Petroleum coke is made at all the refineries. It is the last thing made in the oil refining process. There are many different types of it. Most of it is shipped out on barges to Asia for making steel or Europe for heating. The best type I have used is the Chevron spong coke. I was told by the chemists that it is made from sweet crude oil coming out of Alaska.

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if i ecer get time to finish my forge i'll need to put some pictures up. the forge itself is only about a foot and a half wide with the air feeding directly up from the bottom. it's made out of an old brake rotor.

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After a little research and a phone call to them:

Garnsey Paul & Son
Schuylerville, NY 12871
(518) 695-3346

They're not very far from you at all. They're located on Rte.4. They told me you can't miss them.


Garnsey's coal is hit or miss as far as size goes. Sometimes it's suitable, sometimes it's got chunks in it nearly as big as your fist.

A little further east in Cambridge is Davis Coal. I've had decent results with their coal. Not too many people know they exist, so they were kind enough to donate all the coal we used at our demos at the Schaghticoke and Altamont Fairs to get more exposure.

Davis Coal
949 Turnpike Road, Cambridge, NY 12816
518-677-2722
Contact: Laverne or Sandra Davis

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Propane is clean. It is also quick to get going and to turn off . Its more aviable to some ppl. and is good for ppl in cities and places they cant use a solid fuel.

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I like it, my main forge is propane and I live in the country so burning coal or charcoal isn't an issue.

Frosty

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Hi just a comment about fuels. I myself use both propane and coke. I like to use the coke forge for most of my forging. Alot depends on how fast I need to make something and how long I am going to forge for the day. So for me coke is first and propane is 2nd. I live here in Utah in a city and I have great neighbors so all is good!!!
Gaylan

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...there a story going around about a couple of blacksmith sitting fast food joint and one of them tells the other he just picked up a whole truck load of coke and was on his way home ...some old lady over heard this and went out and called the police about drugs...a short time later the police rolled up with the blue lights on and started hassleing the blacksmiths ...heard they had a load of coke!

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anyone have any pictures of a forge using propane? is there anything about the design of the forge that allows it to use propane as a fuel? i'm realitively certain that a propane forge and a coal forge would have different qualities about them, any thoughts on that one?

...nice story jim...

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Oh yeah, huge difference between a solid fuel forge and a gas forge. The first is a hearth, the second is an enclosed furnace.

The green one is my main propane forge, the one with the hood (hoods are really ineffective for smoke removal) is my coal, charcoal, etc. forge.

Frosty

12011.attach

12012.attach

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I run it on a 100lb tank in the shop and a 40lb. in the field. Most work is done with a single burner so freezing is a rare problem.

Frosty

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cool thanks for the help guys...much appreciated. i started another thread about starting a coal fire, i'm wondering if a coal fire needs to be started differently than a wood or charcoal fire. post there if your interested in helping.

thanks!

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cool thanks for the help guys...much appreciated. i started another thread about starting a coal fire, i'm wondering if a coal fire needs to be started differently than a wood or charcoal fire. post there if your interested in helping.

thanks!


A search of IFI will lead you to several threads about lighting and maintaining coal, coke, wood, charcoal, corn, manure, etc. forging fires.

Frosty

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i am learning to forge through reading and trial and error ( please forgive my spelling ) and i an wanting to know where to get coke for my forge or the price if you know thank you for the information. and can anyone give me some tips on what titanium to use for a knife i want extream quality im a quality nut so any info pretaining to this will be a big help.

Edited by Titaninum_Titan

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Ti makes low quality knives compared to a good high carbon steel; so if you want high quality avoid Ti.

Can you share with us how you got an idea that Ti was extreme quality alloy for knives? I don't know of a single Ti blade that has passed the ABS Journeyman's test---a pretty good test for edge holding and toughness.

I've forged Ti for a knife but it's for my camp set and I wanted something I could boil or throw in a dishwasher when I got back and an eating knife doesn't need to hold an edge like a "cutting" knife. They are also good for diving knives or working where no magnetic signature is required. For those uses Ti is a decent alloy; but for general use it ranks pretty low.

As to where to buy coke, do you need a source in Australia, South Africa, South America, England, Italy,...?

Unless you can tell us where YOU are it's rather a waste of time to post coke purveyors!

Edited by ThomasPowers

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Welcome aboard, glad to have you.

Ti is some really amazing stuff though it's pretty useless as a knife. Oh sure there may be alloys that will do but high quality isn't a "will do" thing. A crowbar is a different thing, a number of common Ti alloys make fine crowbars.

If you read some of the other introductory posts and posts about newcomers wanting to make blades as beginner's projects you will get a feel for what the experienced makers think of the chances of success. It can be done but it isn't going to shortcut the path to quality at all.

If you'll click on "User CP" at the top of the page and edit your profile to show your location, it can make a big difference. IFI is represented by members in more than 50 countries and a lot of info is location specific. If local folk know you're around they can invite you to gatherings, tip you to tool deals and offer hands on help.

Frosty

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i have always wondered about coke for a forge is it better than coal more expensive
what are the drawbacks? and how hard is it to get i live near akron,ohio

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Main drawback is that it requires a constant air flow (bellows monkey or electric blower a good idea, if not essential). Also you can't make a cave fire like with bituminous coal.

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Around here the coke was less than half the price of coal. I am not sure now as guys are getting it from a different supplier. One advantage for those in the city is that there is much less smoke. It does take quite a bit more air though especially if you plan on forge welding with it.

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