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GottMitUns

Ferric Chloride

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Not having a chemical background, or a Radio Shack anymore, I'm wondering were to find Ferric Chloride in South Texas.  Is this a item best ordered off the web or is it common to a off the shelf product like Boric acid/Roach Proof, (Thanks Thomas)

 

Thank You

Russell

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Try a search  in the knife forum.  Most of the questions you will ever have here are already addressed.

BTW There is an excellent video on making your own in the Alchemy forum.  it is stickied at the top

 

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Try a search  in the knife forum.  Most of the questions you will ever have here are already addressed.

BTW There is an excellent video on making your own in the Alchemy forum.  it is stickied at the top

 

:) Thank you. 

J

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There is an etch an recipe going around to make "ferric chloride". I hear it works well as an etch, but real ferric chloride is Muriatic acid that is worn out from dissolving fire scale. You can make it by dissolving scale in the acid until you get the same dark brown color you are used to with ferric chloride. If you are unfamiliar with safety requirements for strong acids like this then please get help. Be safe!

 

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There is an etch an recipe going around to make "ferric chloride". I hear it works well as an etch, but real ferric chloride is Muriatic acid that is worn out from dissolving fire scale. You can make it by dissolving scale in the acid until you get the same dark brown color you are used to with ferric chloride. If you are unfamiliar with safety requirements for strong acids like this then please get help. Be safe!

 

If you watch my video you'll see how to make it. Muriatic and scale technically make a very contaminated form of FeCl2 which is ferrous chloride, adding h2o2 will cause a reaction that will create FeCl3. You'll get much better results by dissolving steel wool in the acid.

J

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If you watch my video you'll see how to make it. Muriatic and scale technically make a very contaminated form of FeCl2 which is ferrous chloride, adding h2o2 will cause a reaction that will create FeCl3. You'll get much better results by dissolving steel wool in the acid.

J

cool to know. Maybe you know, do they treat all the waste from the mills that way or are they really selling ferrous chloride at radio shack?

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You can make "cleaner" ferric chloride using HCL rather than muriatic, though I doubt they dilute HCL with anything but distilled water to make it but if a person is a purist. . . HCL is a LOT faster too, more dangerous but fast.

Frosty The Lucky.

HLC = Muratic acid,  they are the same thing.

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You can make "cleaner" ferric chloride using HCL rather than muriatic, though I doubt they dilute HCL with anything but distilled water to make it but if a person is a purist. . . HCL is a LOT faster too, more dangerous but fast.

Frosty The Lucky.

HLC = Muratic acid,  they are the same thing.

When etching blades FeCl3 is typically diluted so the muriatic works well for the application, because we normally want a slow smooth etch. If I were etching circuit boards and needing it to be more agressive I'd go with HCl.

As for RS and mills, well, industrial creation of FeCl3 is probably a lot different than my backyard chemistry, but that is most definitely what RS is selling when you can find it, but it needs to be diluted.

J

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