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TimberTim

Forklift Tine Anvil, Need Ideas!

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I have recently acquired a set of fairly good sized forklift tines that I would like to make an anvil out of. They stand 4 feet tall, are 4 feet long, 7 inches wide and 1 3/4 inch thick. It took me a little effort and money to get these so I want to make sure I get the most anvil I can out of them.

I have seen many different examples here and elsewhere on the internet of forklift anvils. For those of you that have made them what is the most effective use and design? I am completely new to blacksmithing and am not sure exactly what I need in an anvil. I could obviously make one with a large face. But from what I have been reading in these forums I might be better off with a smaller face and more material underneath than vice versa. Also, I would like to have some of the material left over for other things so if I don't have to use all of it that's a plus.

What are everyone's thoughts? I'm itching to start cutting the things up but I want to do it the right way.

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Nice score Tim!! I'm sure Thomas Powers will see this and respond, he's made a number of anvils from forks so I'll let him pass on suggestions.

Just do NOT get in a hurry, what you have is gold and rushing things can leave you with oh, okay, I'll keep looking. <sigh>

Frosty The Lucky.

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Before you 'chop them up' look up a forklift place and mail them a picture they might be worth their weight in anvil? :D

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Here's a picture of the back side. I think I have seen some this size before on larger 10-15K forklifts and they are HEAVY. Each one probably weighs nearly as much as I do.

Before you 'chop them up' look up a forklift place and mail them a picture they might be worth their weight in anvil? :D

Wouldn't that be ironic? I buy some scrap forklift tines to make an anvil and turn around and sell them for enough $ to buy an anvil. lol   

But, I assume that since they are used and have some wear they are likely out of spec now and couldn't be re used. They're probably only worth their weight in scrap.

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Edited by TimberTim

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Interesting, I have never seen any with the tops that extended so far past the slide.

If it was me, I would cut and set 3 pieces on their side to form the body, and use one piece to form the top. With this method the welding is done just to attach the top to the  center pieces. I don't think it would be necessary to weld all of the center pieces to one another. 3 -12" long pieces  will make one 12" L x 7" W x 8.750"H which should be 208.25# before welding.

Steel plate runs around 40.8# per square foot of 1", so with a little math you can figure the rough weight before welding.

 

Some forks are marked with the alloy used, look them over close. That will help with welding. They are usually a 4140 stylish steel from the info I have received from manufacturers.

The sections with the slide locks could be used to hold plates with various attachments.

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Ironic or not, you'll be surprised at how many guys that have forklifts would like a spare set to ' modify ' so as to not mess with the 'originals '  especially if they are not common.

Think about the handling of large pipes and valves ect. In repair shops etc.

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I'd be making a few phone calls mate, daresay they may even do a straight swap for their old anvil.

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Do you know what size fork they are from 

no good ringing someone and offering forks if you cannot be sure they will fit there forklift

yes people do like to have a spare or second set of (modified) forks 

they would be illegal to use if modified or worn beyond specification but people may still want them 

here is a link for sizing 

http://www.liftruck.co.uk/forklift-forks-tines-replacement.htm

fergy

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Go onto youtube and a boy named Paul krzysz made an anvilout of stock similar in size to them. The video is called something like how to make an anvil, very informative and very detailed.

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I don'e know how well equipped/skilled you are; but the sharp ends would make a nice side shelf for doing fine work on; if you had the cutting and welding equipment/skills.

You might also think about welding a piece of structural tubing on the end to get a hardy hole---make the heavy hitting hardies offset so they rest on the anvil.

May I commend to your attention:  http://www.marco-borromei.com/fork.html   and yes I am the Thomas mentioned (and still have the other tine in my scrap pile!)

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Thank you all for the feedback!

I'll do some more research before cutting them up. I would have to make a decent profit though for it to be worthwhile. I live in a small town 2 + hours away from the nearest city which is where I got them for $100 and probably where I would have to take them to sell. Add that to the fact that anvils are over priced and hard to find here. So I'd be happy just making an anvil out of the tines.

I'll put some more thought into the design based upon previous input. I was originally thinking along the lines "BIGGUNDOCTOR" was in that I would have 4 pieces laid on their side with one more laying flat on the top.

One other question I had was do I really need a horn? That would be a lot less work if I didn't. Like I said I'm totally green so I don't know if I really need one. Two other things I think I will need though is a hardy and a step. I could do this fairly easy by offsetting the top plat some. There is a local machinist who I may ask to weld and cut a hardy hole for me as I only have a small welder. What size hardy should I go with? Do I need a pritchel hole as well?

Thanks!

Edited by TimberTim

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While handy horns aren't all that necessary and if you rig a hardy hole like Thomas suggests you can forge an anvil bic. A bottom tool that does what a horn does.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Those are lumber forks, with the full taper blade and tall back height. The heels probably got too thin from them dragging them and they flunked the OSHA inspection. I'd make whatever out of them. Doubt they can "legally" be put back in service.

 

Brian

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