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Champion 400 blower and bearings


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An impact wrench, either pneumatic or electric will break the nut loose easily. You can usually just hold on to the fan hub with a gloved hand. The fan hub is threaded as well and make sure the set screw is removed and a some penetrating oil helps. After you get everything off a thread file is easier and cheaper to find and use than trying to locate a die for the unusual thread.

I'm a machinist by trade. I'd much rather use a clean up die like this one http://www.amazon.com/Right-Hand-Thread-Die-TPI/dp/B008ASBBRU than mess with a thread file. Unfortunately, that one is plain carbon steel and will be more prone to chipped or broken teeth than a high speed steel version.

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I managed to get the rear fan lock nut, washer, cone, and bearings out but am unsure of how to lock the fan shaft in order to remove the front fan shaft lock nut on the fan side. Going to pick up the 1" socket for it today with a few other odds and ends.

Never mind, read the advice a few posts back, will try that today.

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This front fan nut is really giving me trouble. I've got the right sized socket for it now but it won't budge. It's a little hard to get good leverage on since I need to hold the fan spider to prevent spin. Also, I'm not 100% sure which way to twist the nut. The rear fan locknut in the back bearing assemble came off to the left and in the patent diagram the threads on the front of the fan shaft are running in the same direction - so that means I should be twisting it left, correct? I've hit it aggressively with penetrating oil and some wire brushing to try and break up any rust that's holding it on. If someone knows for sure which way this nut is supposed to turn off I'd be in your debt. When I examine the protruding threads it looks like it turns off left, but it's not budging.

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Edited by Patrick Kerns
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Liquid wrench, mild heating of the nut, tap gently but firmly with hammer on center shaft, repeat.   Standard auto mechanic technique for removing stubborn nuts.  Liquid Wrench is one of a number of similar compounds.  Go to auto parts store if you don't find it at Local big box store.  

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Liquid wrench, mild heating of the nut, tap gently but firmly with hammer on center shaft, repeat.   Standard auto mechanic technique for removing stubborn nuts.  Liquid Wrench is one of a number of similar compounds.  Go to auto parts store if you don't find it at Local big box store.  

Thanks! Liquid wrench is indeed what I've been using. Will try the heat, tap, repeat. Much appreciated. What's the best way to heat the nut?

Edited by Patrick Kerns
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I usually use a propane torch  but it just occurred to me that a heavy duty soldering Iron might also work.   The trick is to heat the nut faster than the shaft which being heavier and bigger should heat less quickly. Takes a little patience but works almost every time :)

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Patrick,

You are stalled at exactly the same point that I am. I'll try a jam nut on the rear of the shaft. I have to remove the cone in back to get enough threads to lock the nuts. I'll let you know how it goes.

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Bo T, I had luck using a small adjustable wrench on the flats of the cone to remove it in back if that helps at all. I'll search through my collection and see if I have anything to try as a jam nut.

I've been trying the heat, penetrating oil, tap, repeat process this morning but no luck so far. I think I need more heat, have been using wooden matches :) Will pickup a long butane lighter and try that. Either that or I will try my soldering iron.

I'm beginning to grasp why the guy at practical machinist recommended applying anti-seize compound to to the fan shaft before putting this darn nut back on.

Edited by Patrick Kerns
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Bo T, I had luck using a small adjustable wrench on the flats of the cone to remove it in back if that helps at all. I'll search through my collection and see if I have anything to try as a jam nut.

I've been trying the heat, penetrating oil, tap, repeat process this morning but no luck so far. I think I need more heat, have been using wooden matches :) Will pickup a long butane lighter and try that. Either that or I will try my soldering iron.

I'm beginning to grasp why the guy at practical machinist recommended applying anti-seize compound to to the fan shaft before putting this darn nut back on.

matches or a butane lighter is not indicated.  Handy man propane torch or the weight of soldering iron  that is used in copper roof install LOL AMERICAN BEAUTY

  • Soldering Iron, 300W, Heavy DutySoldering Iron,300W,Heavy Duty
  • Item # 19YP56
  • Mfr. Model # 3178E-300
  • Soldering Iron,Watts 300,Temp. (F) 1050 Degrees ,Design Ergonomically Friendly Design Reduces Stress on Hand and Wrist,Features Exacting Laser Cut, Precision Brazing Operation,Handle Hardwood,Includes Stand,Standards CE,Tip Chisel Style,Type Professional-Grade,For Use With Mfr. No. 45C,Application Heavy Duty

    Soldering Iron,Watts 300,Temp. (F) 1050 Degrees ,Design Ergonomically Friendly Design Reduces Stress on Hand...More

    •  
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Went ahead and pulled the cone and put the regular nut and jam nut on. Didn't work, I could only put 30-40 lbs of torque on the nut before the jam nut started backing off.. Don't have power to my shop so I had to charge and lug the compressor out (to much of a voltage drop with the extension cord that I have). Held the jam nuts tight and gave it a couple of hits with the air gun and just about the time the pressure dropped to low - the nut came loose.:o Which made my day. :) Anyway. pulled the fan and fan shroud and after fighting for a while got the grease cup off. If you use jam nuts don't take them off as the next nut might be stuck as well. Anyway off to buy a lottery ticket.

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Bo, did you just screw the nut and jam nut down all the way so they held the shaft in place or where you holding one with a wrench while you went at the fan nut? Not sure how to apply the jam nut principle on this application. Need to pick up a propane take for my torch so I can really heat up that nut, continuing to put liquid wrench on it every day.

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