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I got this from the flea-market this sunday. It was for sale from more than an year, but it seems that it had my name written on it, at the beginning I didn't consider buying it, too small, not in excellent condition, the price too high to my taste. but recently I done some work for a client, and, as payment I asked him to buy this anvil. so, now I have a foot rest under my computer desk until I'll make it a stand.

the only problem is that I don't know who manufactured this, any ideas? it seems to have cast feet, forged body and a faceplate, if that line just under the face, on the side is a welding line. the face seem as hard as glass.

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It looks like an older Hay Budden to me because of the peculiar upward swoop of the horn. Before the top half was forge welded steel.

But it's weight and serial number are stamped where a Trenton would normally be stamped.

Edited by Anthony San Miguel

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Nope the rough underside of the heel and the caplet makes it dead on an Arm and Hammer made in Columbus OH.  try to get the serial and we can see if AinA has a date for it.

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Save that the two anvil makers in Columbus (Trenton and Arm and Hammer) were known to share their bases back and forth when necessary and I know of *no* other company that left the steam hammer marks on the underside of the heel

I have a clearly marked 93# Arm and Hammer with a caplet indentation.

Edited by ThomasPowers

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page 272 in Anvils in America has a nice picture of the caplet and rough under side and says: "If you are still in doubt of the anvils make look under the heel.  This is usually a dead giveaway and possibly should be the first identification mark to be looked for on an Arm and hammer anvil....not one other wrought anvil maker leaves the the underside of the heel with such outstanding fullering marks"

18425 would be be 1913-1914 for an Arm and Hammer.

1900 for a Trenton

if there is a 6th digit it would be 1923 for a Trenton and the Arm and hammer did not go into 6 digits.

Edited by ThomasPowers

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I had never heard about them sharing bases. I always associated the caplet shape to a Trenton. Good to know. Is that written up somewhere? 

I love my 180# Arm & Hammer. 

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All my anvil knowledge came from Anvils in America by Richard Postman and my experiences.  Trent and Arm in Hammer anvils were both made in Columbus OH---by different companies.  I've visited the locations when I lived there, (one ex employee told me that when they closed the doors there was a line of anvils at the top of a steep river bank so I had to go check if any fell in...)

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thank you, either manufacturers are good ones and I'm happy with it. American anvils are very rare here, but I managed to have two of them - I also have a 100lb Fisher in almost mint condition. 

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