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Ok so I've got a old 321 pound Peter Wright Anvil. I was wondering if it will effect the value or worth of the anvil if I were to do some fringing on the top face. Mainly along the edges because there is some dings and chips along the sides. I'd like to grind a little to reshape at least one edge but if it's gonna mess with the value or anything like that then I'll just continue using a large separate piece of steel for the sharp edges. Any suggestions and or tips would be greatly appreciated 

Thanks.

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Edited by T.hogg

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I seriously don't see anything worth messing with, it is fine as is. Most anvils could use a little dressing to get rid of the sharp edges, as they can lead to cold shuts on the workpiece. I have a reprint of a book from the 1800's that addresses that fact back then. 

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Why not USE the anvil for a year and then ask the same question.

Many of your problems may go away under the hot metal and the hammer.

 

 

Edited by Glenn

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Anvils are not so much about the "value" of them monetarily, but how useful they are to a person. A top of the line fishing pole is worthless to the man who doesn't fish. Don't try to "repair" this anvil. work on it, and be happy! 

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thats not a bad looking anvil ! yes you could round the edges some ? YET how much ??

I would use it as is for now ! until you have some time behind you're anvil then you will know where & how MUCH

to grind to round the edge's or have the edges repair welded -- of witch I have done to over 65 anvils +  right

It takes time LOL

Steve's Welding  

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Appreciate all the advice and opinions. I really don't care much about the value so much because I have no plans of ever getting rid of it. I guess what I meant is would it be better to have cleaner edges. I am new to blacksmithing so obviously I don't know near as much as you guys hence the reason I'm asking. I found the anvil for a steal. Gave 160 for it. A guy apparently found it in his grandpa's old barn after he passed. It's something I eventually would like to pass down to my kids one day when I actually have kids so I just wanna get it in the best shape I can. I plan on using it alot which is another reason why I posted this thread. I'll definitely take the advice given and put some hours on it first.

Thanks again

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Use her as she is, there isn't enough chipping on the edges to mess with trying to grind it out. In truth most anvils I've seen where chipping has been "repaired" have suffered more damage. I have one, the seller assured me the repairs had been done by a fellow who knows what he's doing. Well, the welds are okay but when he ground them he didn't hold the disk parallel to the face so both edges are slanting up to almost 2" in. I don't much care about sharp edges but it'd sure be nice to be able to forge a square 90* bend on it more easily.

I'd love to add that beautiful old lady of yours to my shop and put her to work right  now.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Don't do anything to that anvil but use it.  Please.  No grinder, no welder.  

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Does it have Peter Wright stamped on it by the way? The jpeg artefacts  mean I cannot read that. On my Peter Wright the legend and the weight is written on the opposite side than you have shown…with the bick to the right. Interesting that it does not have the characteristic ledges on the base.

You are so lucky to have one without the usual abuse of chisel marks down the corners of the sweeps, it always annoys me when I notice them on mine.

As all the others have said, don't touch it.

Especially if you are just beginning. Do your 10,000 hours then have another look and think and then you will know to still leave it well alone! 

How long a sharp edge will you ever require? Your hammer face is maximum 2" across. You won't be strong enough to be setting a shoulder wider than an inch or so unless you have a striker. A top set or a hardy block as you suggest will work fine if you do need more. In most forged forms you require a fillet / radius in the inside corner for strength let alone aesthetics or preventing a cold shut during further operations.

It is not a question of messing up the financial value, it is one of messing up the value of the anvil as useful working tool. An anvil with two sharp and square edges running down the sides has only one form the corners can produce, various radii and nicks and dents make it much more versatile.

As you get to know your anvil you will find every nick and blemish and soft corner will have a role and function. The hollow will enable you to straighten bars towards the end of a heat when you need a bit of over bending to compensate for spring back. 

Think of the different shapes on those corners as vocabulary, the more words you have the better you can express yourself.

Alan

Edited by Alan Evans

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Next time you want a pic showing detail try oblique lighting, I like a LED flashlight laid on the surface or held parallel. Then put a piece of single ply tissue over the flash if you can't turn it off. You'll be able to see details in the picture you can't in person. Dusting the subject with chalk or bath powder then wiping the surface will show more detail as well.

Personally I wouldn't care by whom or where she was made, I'd give her a working position in my shop and let hot iron and hammers put a proper shine on her face. Heck I'd have to clean my shop to do it, it'd be a win win. B)

Frosty The Lucky.

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I'm definitely gonna put her to use lol I used it some over the weekend while making a knife and what not. I finally got everything done on the stand it's on and everything. I'm very happy with it

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There are hundreds of folks out there in blacksmith land who would gladly swap their RR Rail anvil for this one.  Looks great enjoy it as we all get older we get some "rough edges" prefer to think of them as Education Marks. 

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I've got a couple of RR anvils also, I honestly just got lucky when I found this one. But yeah I got it set up as is and have no plans on messing with it other then forging and working on it. I do appreciate the help and opinions. I plan on doing a little work later today

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