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I Forge Iron

chef, integral bolster, silver steel


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hello all

here is a chef knife forged from 115CrV3, "german silver-steel", a very fine steel for very fine blades. it has a blade of ~ 20cm long (8inch) and ~ 5cm (2inch) wide.

the handle is the "classical" for me already brushed wenge (because the people wants it, and who I am to be against it?)

 

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Beutiful knife, no recaso wich is good on a chef (recasoes have to be grount down to keep the back if the blade on the cuttingboard as the blade is sharpend away) the spine curving up looks odd compaired to a french chef, but the edge profile looks perfect (like the Japonise chefs) only question, is the handle stabalised ot otherwise sealed? Gunk and germs colect on your handles and if not sealed can penitrate the wood. Old school was to soak in melted parifin, a new knife handle to prevent this. 

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DANG is right! You do beautiful work Matei. Were that knife in my kitchen I'd have to devise a holder that would show it off to the living room.

I ditto Charles question about sealing the wood to prevent cross contamination or a germ nursery. If your customers like THAT wood you might maybe consider using it. Trying to "educate" them into a different preference  seems to be an obsession with some guys. Funny thing, it's usually the same guys who complain about not being able to make anything in sales. :rolleyes:

Frosty The Lucky.

Edited by Frosty
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glad you guys like it. 

yes, Charles, you're right about that ricasso type on chefs, I always advice people against them just because of that reason, even that that knives are regarded as "superior". I treat that handles with some kind of oil based varnish which penetrates wood and harden. I apply it and heat the handle with a heat gun until the oil doesn't penetrate anymore, then let it dry. after it's dry, I apply another hand of that varnish and wipe the excess with a cloth.

Frosty - well, I already used that wood on many knives. the truth is that I like it too, it looks good and is very pleasant to the touch. also is a wood which is quiet stable.  

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