T.hogg

Need Help Identifying an old Anvil I recently bought

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I recently acquired an old barn find Anvil from a friend here in East Texas and I would really like to learn more about it. I've looked it over the best I can. I haven't had a chance to clean it up much or try the flour trick to bring out any writing or stamps. I've only found the numbers "2" "3"and "21" on the front, I did some research on the numbers and I'm pretty sure it means the weight. When I Used The Old English Weight Method They used back in the day on most anvils and it came out to be 321 lbs which makes since because it weighs 320 lbs. I also can barely make out the number "299" on the rear end and I have no idea what that means. I'm hoping someone might know something about it or may have an anvil similar to mine.

Thanks.

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I wouldn't be surprised if it said Peter Wright on it under the crud.  The CWT weight does nail it down as English and the other most common English brand over here, Mousehole, had thicker waists.  Now there has been well over 250 English anvil makers found; but the heavy hitters were PW and MH

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I'm hoping I can find something I'm able to make out once I clean it up some. I only payed 150 for it. I'd just really like to have an idea of age and maker

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For less than two bucks a pound I reckon you did extremely well to acquire an anvil in that condition.

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$1.47 a pound. So I just cleaned it up real good and found "Peter Wright" stamped on the back

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320 lbs. for $150 =$ 1.47 a lb.  I'm confused.........     I'm thunkin' $ .47 a lb.     even better deal...  Dave

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Yeah, my maths was wrong too ... 47c a pound. That's unbelievable value.:blink:

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I'm thinking the guy just didn't know what he had idk. He said he looked online about what makes a good anvil but I guess he skipped the pricing part. Which is fine by me. I'm kinda new to the forging and blacksmithing scene. I'm a welder by trade so if you had to guess based on the photos what might the value be? Not that I want to sell but I'm curious

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Not sure why it came out sideways.

It's got some dings and a few small chips on one edge of the flat surface on top. There's a slight dip on the top surface from I'm guessing years of use. No cracks or anything of that nature. It's got a really good rebound. With a ring. It's not the loudest ring but it is there.. 

Edited by T.hogg

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Nice anvil,  bargain price, If you use an IPhone to take the pictures you need to have the phone side ways with the camera lens top left, I made the same mistake:)

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The second and third images would indicate you need just a wee bit taller stand for the anvil perhaps...

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Thanks Stan. I had it taller but It wasn't at a comfortable hieght for me so i cut a few inches off. I'm 5'10" so I made it a little above waist height which for me, made a big difference I think. I'd rather swing low then try and swing higher

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  That stand looks great.  I see you used those leather hammer loops.  That had to cost a few bucks.  Perhaps some old fashioned forged staples would allow you to stash them as replacement parts for your tool belt.  If you made enough of them you'd probably have plenty of storage for a couple pairs of tongs too.

  I'm 6'1" and I like anvils right around mid-thigh (loose fist high) for most work that I get wrapped up in.  I like striking anvils around the knees though if I'm going for full swings on large stock.

  Try clamping it down to some rubber matting, it took the ring right out of my anvil.  Other guys will suggest silicon, or a fabricated pipe stand,  I haven't had the chance to try it yet.

  As to the value, I'd say anywhere from $350 to $1000 depending on the market in your area and how good you are at haggling.  Maybe even $1500 if you're real desperate in a very anvil poor area.

  Speaking of area, where are you again?  Oh yeah, East Texas.  You'll probably hear that question a lot until you put it in your profile so that it shows under your avatar.

  All said, nice find, sharp looking stand.

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Thanks for the advice. I have another question i forgot to ask earlier. On the back of my anvil it has the number "299" and I'm not sure what that means. Hoping one of yall might could help

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I'm 22 and I really don't have much experience in blacksmithing. I admire the work and craftsmanship that goes into forging a piece of metal into something completely different oppose to welding things together. I don't have anything to really learn from other then just going outside and doing it myself. That's why I have so many questions and what not. There's something about metal work that just makes me want to know/learn everything I can. I've made my own coal forge and stuff but I was also wondering if there's a specific brand or shape of hammers that works better then others. Wanting to make knives and stuff at some point

And any other tips or advice would be greatly appreciated also.

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I happen to know that there is a public library in Longview TX where you could most likely ILL "The Complete Modern Blacksmith" Weygers and "Backyard Blacksmithing" Simms and "The Complete Bladesmith" Hrisoulas  These would get you quite far down the road.

As to hammers:  one with a well dressed face so as to not leave bad dents in your workpiece.  I tell my students that they should choose the heaviest hammer that they can use with *CONTROL* for an entire forging session---which usually isn't more than 2 to 2.5 pounds....  Shape the handle to fit YOUR hand

Edited by ThomasPowers

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  If you're looking for reference materials there are a few under the "Downloads" tab (in the dropdown from that little 3 bar icon in the top right corner on the mobile site).  Farm Blacksmithing isn't a bad place to start.  Also try searching "blacksmith", "forge", "heat treating", etc. on Google Books.  There are lots of old books that are free download on there.  I'm still working down the bunch that I downloaded almost 3 years ago.

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Mr. Hogg,

Who cares what it's Birthday is. Clean it up, Give it a Bath and a Shampoo, Clean it's Toe-Nails, Add a little colour to it's Body. Make it want to work with you.

Enjoy the Journey, the end destination is 6 feet down.

Neil

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