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Not what I intended to make last weekend, but it turned out ok.

sterling and oxygen free copper. I did not work the pattern enough. But each time I learn, thought I would share.

next one will get a silver liner (I hope) . I am shooting for a seamless ring, but this has a seam.

 

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I really like the contrast on that one Tristan. I'll be keeping my eyes open for the next venture. Doesn't a silver liner turn a finger black? Silver turns my skin black. Well, rubs off and tarnishes black that is.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I like it! What type of Silver? Standard Sterling or Argentium?

I've recently made a big fat billet of Fine Silver/Copper. Maybe I'll post a pic or two soon.....

Edited by cliffrat
forgot sumthin

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sorry, I didn't get a notice on this and just saw it.. 

I used sterling. I have never had an issue against skin using sterling, Frosty maybe the issue was fine silver? it tarnishes.

I ended up this weekend adding a 22 gauge sterling liner to it, now I won't turn green either. 8-)

 

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I've had a sterling pendant that turned my a spot on my breastbone black for the first few weeks I wore it.  Just dip sterling in bleach and it first turns purple, then darkening shades of gray.

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So Teeny, give us the info. What did you start with, how hot to weld, how did you forge it, what temperature, etc, etc, etc.

I've been killing myself,(and my bank account) trying the fine silver/copper combo. The first two billets came apart during the forging. I had read that fine silver was easier to work with copper than sterling, so I'm intrigued by your apparent success.

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If it makes you feel better I melted my first try. After learning with nickel and copper I had a mental struggle with doing this cold enough. Silver will crack if you move it when glowing bright.The temp to weld is just above black heat, just a little glow. If you get hotter you may be able to save it if you wait for the temp to drop back down to black before you set the weld. I also set my first weld or two with my vise instead of a hammer. That has made a big difference for me as it reduces the bounce that I feel tears the initial welds. After setting the weld I knock it out of my frame , consolidate and twist at black heat.

also I should mention it is important to clean up and even all the edges before twisting or hammering against the grain.i grind and make sure the forces are in line with the sheets so there is no tendency to tear.

with silver the sharpest corners all seem to crack at little, not a big deal if you keep things cool enough.it also helps to keep the edges rounded gently with the hammer to reduce the tendency. If the corner cracks too much bite the bullet and clean it up before you continue, it won't get better if you ignore the issues at this point.

let me know how you get on, I am happy to help however I can.

Here is a picture with the liner in place.

 

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thanks Mitch, I usually spend more time on pattern development but I was happy with this as it came out. 

Binnion  wrote about corrosion issues with copper in rings not being good for a long term solution but I am happy with it for now. someday I will save my money for some gold and give it a try instead of copper. 

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Thanks for the info. I really appreciate it. The ring looks very cool. How did you fuse the silver liner to it?

BTW - you might think about putting a patina on the copper to keep it from corroding or tarnishing. Baldwin's makes a pretty nice one that turns the copper a rich brown color and it won't touch the silver..

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anytime. the liner was soldered in. the trick there is a close fit before you heat it. 

I would like to try the baldwins some time but getting chemicals shipped to Alaska is becoming harder and more expensive every year. 

at this point I am still experimenting with local options for darkening it. 

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getting chemicals shipped to Alaska is becoming harder and more expensive every year. 

Sounds like a business opportunity.............

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Sounds like a business opportunity.............

Sounds like it to someone in the lower 48 but EPA has Alaska so tied up even shipping sodium silicate in quantities over 1oz. drives prices stupid high. Last time I checked Radio shack was the only place I could find Sodium silicate and a 1/4 oz bottle was $18.00.

A person has to go through a licensed and bonded gunsmith to buy bluing and it's still ridiculously expensive. It's cheaper to send a gun to the gunsmith than touch up the bluing.

Frosty The Lucky.

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"A person has to go through a licensed and bonded gunsmith to buy bluing"

What about cold bluing supplies?

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"A person has to go through a licensed and bonded gunsmith to buy bluing"

What about cold bluing supplies?

I don't know, probably have to call around and find out. EPA has Alaska in a punitive strangle hold on anything environmental.

Frosty The Lucky.

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anytime. the liner was soldered in. the trick there is a close fit before you heat it. 

I would like to try the baldwins some time but getting chemicals shipped to Alaska is becoming harder and more expensive every year. 

at this point I am still experimenting with local options for darkening it. 

Have you tried getting liver of sulfur? My wife uses that for coloring silver, copper, bronze, brass, etc. Mostly adds black to the metal surface. Concho makers use it to darken the engravings on the conchos. Is that on the "No Fly List" too?

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I don't know, probably have to call around and find out. EPA has Alaska in a punitive strangle hold on anything environmental.

Frosty The Lucky.

So do these restrictions apply to commercial shippers only, or to private individuals as well? Can let's just say hypothetically, a friend of yours in the lower 48 UPS you some stuff and not worry about all those inconvenient regulations?

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So do these restrictions apply to commercial shippers only, or to private individuals as well? Can let's just say hypothetically, a friend of yours in the lower 48 UPS you some stuff and not worry about all those inconvenient regulations?

I suppose a hypothetical person who did and didn't get caught. I have no idea what the security screening on freight is like, mail can be pretty tight. IIRC, the USPS has sniffers since the Anthrax incidents, IEDs are a worry as is chem and bio.

I don't do chemistry much beyond derusting with phosphoric acid and occasional acid etches.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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Most of the shipping issues for non bulk shipments are due to hazmat shipping regulations for airfreight. Its gotten so convoluted and complicated that many companies just wont do it for fear of doing the paperwork wrong and getting fined. McMaster Carr wont even ship bench vise jaw protectors to Alaska because of the small magnets that hold them on the vise are considered hazmat for airfreight.

There are companies that specialize in preparing hazmat shipments for a fee of course. The last time I used one for shipping a pressurized Halon aircraft fire bottle that has a small explosive device to activate it the handling fee was an additional $150.00 plus the $200.00 shipment fee. The fire bottle weighed 11lbs and is the size of a bowling ball.

UPS and FedEx ground shipments actually end up going up by air to AK, they just have more time to move them when space is avialable.

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Have you tried getting liver of sulfur? My wife uses that for coloring silver, copper, bronze, brass, etc. Mostly adds black to the metal surface. Concho makers use it to darken the engravings on the conchos. Is that on the "No Fly List" too?

I have some LOS the issue is it darkens both metals.i want one to stay barite to increase the contrast. Some people break the  shipping rules but I can't afford the fines if I got caught, so I don't.  

Making magnets Hazmat has always made me a bit crazy. It as if they think a plane still uses a magnetic compass for navigation.

cold bluing supplies are available, but expensive and not of any real used other than cosmetically to hide scratches on a gun. I have used cold blue on steel projects and it is a disappointing grey color when you do a big area.

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This is going to sound counter intuitive, but cold bluing works much better if applied hot. Like around 170-200*F. Even a light lick with a propane torch immediately after application increases the effectiveness of the bluing significantly.

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thanks for that. I was applying it at my normal winter shop temp. that may explain things....

 

How'd you get it out of the bottle at YOUR shop's normal winter temp? I know it's "heated" but still. . .

Frosty The Lucky.

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How'd you get it out of the bottle at YOUR shop's normal winter temp? I know it's "heated" but still. . .

Frosty The Lucky.

I am spoiled, it was 50f in there as I had been forging...

 

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