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I recently did  a blacksmith course at Toowoomba in Southern Queensland and while there we visited a museum that had a pioneer blacksmith shop. Thought I would post a couple of pics just for interest.

Unfortunately the blacksmith wasn't working that day. I would have liked to have had a chat with him. The shop was quite extensive and had some interesting items.

I would have only a couple of suggestions:

Move the plastic oil containers out of sight in a cupboard or something.

I think I could find a better spot for that lovely swage block. 

Don't like the reference on the signboard to the 'smithy' as a person. The smithy is the place!

He had a couple of great anvils but they were covered with oil rags to stop the rust. Interesting place though and very nice people who run it.

Here are the pics:

 

 

DSC_3097.jpg

DSC_3098.jpg

DSC_3099.jpg

DSC_3100.jpg

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Don't like the reference on the signboard to the 'smithy' as a person. The smithy is the place!

 

 

DSC_3099.jpg

 

​I think the signboard is quite correct in it's usage.

Traditionally, ( in America, at least ) we call a blacksmith shop a "smithy", ... and the Blacksmith a "Smithy" as well.  ( note the capitalization )

I would congratulate the Author of the signboard, ... had He not "dropper the ball" in the second paragraph.  :P

( Nice photos, ... by the way, ... getting good contrast in shadowed interiors, is often tougher than you'd think. )

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We now live in an era where grammar, syntax and composition have fallen on hard times.  :(

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And now that I've begun "picking nits", ... I'd propose, that a small town would be much more likely to support a Wainwright's Shop, ... doing all manner of repairs on "conveyances", ... rather than the more specialized Wheelwright.

 

.

Edited by SmoothBore

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ausfire   Thanks a million for the pictures, would love to see a section here where more could be posted for all to see.  I find these quite fascinating to look at and study.  Sign wise maybe we just  have local differences.  Last majority of people will find information there that is interesting to them at the moment they read it and forgotten 10 minutes later.   

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Greetings Ausfire,

Thanx for the pictures of the old time shop. I like the use of line shafts to drive the equipment. After setting up my line shaft shop I know what a challenge it is to make everything work.  BTW .. I have not forgot your request on the lifter . I will be making some in the next few weeks and will send Picts. 

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim

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​I think the signboard is quite correct in it's usage.

Traditionally, ( in America, at least ) we call a blacksmith shop a "smithy", ... and the Blacksmith a "Smithy" as well.  ( note the capitalization )

( Nice photos, ... by the way, ... getting good contrast in shadowed interiors, is often tougher than you'd think. 

Yes, I think there may be some regional difference here ... and I blame Mr Longfellow who wrote The Village Blacksmith. Or more correctly, the people who misread his lines:

Under the spreading chestnut tree the village smithy stands

The smith a mighty man is he, etc

And since Australian English follows BrE more than AmE we call the building a smithy. It's a minor point though, and I'm getting used to being called a smithy. No point in sweating the small stuff.

And thanks for your comment on the photos. A flash diffuser helps. (And a past life as a news photographer.)

(Don't know what's happening with these quote boxes .. sorry if this appears jumbled.)

 

 

 

 

 

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And thanks, Jim. I make a lot of pot lifters and your design of the steadying version was fascinating.

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Great photos, Ausfire.  Seeing how things evolved in different parts of the world is always interesting. I'd love to have a corrugated quench tank like that.  Can't imagine how you'd seal it against leaks, but it sure looks like it belongs in a smithy!

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That's a drain culvert like you see under roads, driveways, etc. for drainage. Just cut it square and weld it to a base, just like any pipe. It's galvy so take adequate precautions.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Great post mate. I really enjoy the history of 'trades', a bit of knowing where we've come from.

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Having a shop where there is equipment run by lineshafting I can fully appreciate why they went away from it!  Lot of work to lubricate maintain and operate.

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Are some tough smiths down there if they are drinking from the quench tank.  Really like their iron.  (ornage cup on left side of the tank).

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That's a drain culvert like you see under roads, driveways, etc. for drainage. Just cut it square and weld it to a base, just like any pipe. It's galvy so take adequate precautions.

Frosty The Lucky.

Nah, I don't think so, Frosty. It's more like one of those small gal rainwater tanks. I have one here that I dragged out of the scrap with the intention of using it as a quench tub when I get round to cutting the top off it. The bottom seems to be soldered in place. It had a tap in the bottom which would be handy for draining the old rusty water. Just another job to do.

Here's a pic of it:

 

DSC_4264.jpg

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I'm going to have to keep my eyes out for something like that at the farm stores around here.  Throw in a bit of chlorine to stop the mosquitoes, and drain once a year with the oh-so-convenient spigot on the side.  

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VaughnT make sure you drain it on the opposite end of the calendar from Christmas then you can have Christmas presents twice a year.  It is amazing what you can find at the bottom of your quench tank!!

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VaughnT make sure you drain it on the opposite end of the calendar from Christmas then you can have Christmas presents twice a year.  It is amazing what you can find at the bottom of your quench tank!!

That's true! My coffee mug is lurking down there somewhere in the sludge, along with a couple of punches. A drain tap is a good idea!

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