jac

Peter Wright: Interesting Heel

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Thanks for having a look at this:

PW_Heel.thumb.PNG.74865f13796ab5501b0c41

Sometimes it's hard for me to judge what I see in photographs. To me, there appears to be significant wear to the heel. The chipping beside the Hardie seems common enough, for a used anvil, but the smooth wear around the perimeter of the heel seems sort of strange. Perhaps a farrier was using the anvil to spread shoes. What do you make of it? Does it look like a nice face, or are you troubled by the wear? How do the edges look to you, in general? This newb thanks you greatly!

 

Edited by jac
Typo. Additional query added. Further clarification.

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The face is in good shape - as are most of the edges.  A very serviceable anvil with many years left in it.

No telling about the wear pattern but it is inconsequential.

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Looks fine.

Interesting that one corner of the cutting table has been taken off.

Fascinating to see how the regular use for one project by one owner creates a specific character to the anvil that subsequent owners/users can celebrate.

Who knows? The particular wear pattern of that anvil might enable you to create the masterpiece that another anvil would deny!

Get to know it and enjoy a fine tool.

Alan

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Thank you both very much. Yes, Alan, I didn't mention the table in my original post, but it was a curiosity to me, too. I wonder what could have caused the damage to the table? It's very interesting.

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Thanks, Thomas. I felt the same way; but being a newb, your comment is most reassuring.

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Welcome aboard Jac, glad to have you. If you'll put your general location in the header you might be surprised how many of the IFI gang live within visiting distance.

That's wear, not damage. That fine old lady was used in a production capacity. The smith had a line of products and used the same areas of the anvil probably for decades. After a while you'll find you have favorite areas on your anvil for certain purposes. For instance I use one radiused edge to isolate areas and another radiused edge to set shoulders. The first is a tighter radius and the latter is a wider radius.

The wear on your anvil tells a story if we could here it. I'd build her a stand and give her a place in my shop in a heart beat.

Frosty The Lucky.

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That's a fine looking anvil that has seen a lot of work. Pity it cannot tell its story. It will serve you well.

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Thanks Frosty and ausfire! Added data, as suggested, Frosty. You've opened up a whole new dimension of thinking for me. Sadly, I was only looking at anvils as tools, but they're reflections of those they served and almost have lives of their own. Many thanks to all!

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They ARE tools and as with any tool that has longevity shows it's life's story in the wear. An anvil is a little different than most mundane tools though seeing as most other tools were originated or invented on an anvil. Think of it as the great grandparent of tools with hammers and fire. Almost everything else followed. Even knapped stone is expressed from an anvil stone with a hammer.

Just don't fall into the common misconception that tools do anything, they're just highly refined dirt. It's the human that does the work, the tools just make it easier or possible. Without us clever monkeys they're just as happy returning to dust and dirt.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I have a Peter Wright that also has that front corner of the cutting table worn down, I agree that it appears to be use, not abuse... doesn't look cut off but worn down.  

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Thanks, Spanky. Interesting that your PW is similar. I felt the same: use not abuse. It helps immeasurably to know you feel the same. Does anyone know if a maker had ever produced an anvil with a table having a rounded corner like that?

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My Peter Wright does not have a cutting table at all. The hard facing continues over the top of that bit.

I would think yours is caused by wear though. 

A few more pictures of the area may yield clues...

Alan

Edited by Alan Evans

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Thanks very much, Alan. For me, it's difficult to know what's going on just by looking at a photo. I hope the white mark below the rounded table doesn't indicate a crack or repair. The current owner assures me there are no cracks or repairs, but we'll see:

 

PW_Opposite_Logo.thumb.PNG.e60b39572a4f9

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As said I think it looks like deliberate modification than abuse. The white mark looks to be a shiny spot to me. 

Andy

Yes I agree. From this angle there appears to be a number of parallel-ish gouges from top right to bottom left, parallel to the bottom shiny line. Suspiciously like vestigial gas axe ripples. The bottom shiny line being the last ridge which has been picked out by the wet-and-dry the guy wiped it over with before he painted on the shiny gloop.

I wonder if that was for a particular job or just a clean up having used the anvil as a cutting table/trestle?

I am sure you will find a use for it one day! :)

Alan

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LOL!! Yeah, it's in the garage right now. I think my wife is getting sick of my trips to the garage to gawk at it. Going to get started building a stand for it soon!

Once again, thanks to all for the invaluable help provided. I think Alan, Mac, and perhaps others were correct: the cutting table was worn or deliberately modified. There were no cracks or repairs in the area worn/modified. The white spot in the photo above appears to me to be a photographic anomaly. She passed the ball-bearing test with flying colors!

Edited by jac
Correction.

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Well done!  

Make up up a stand, get the gloop off and give it a rub over with a bit of stove black / graphite and wax. 

It will look just like a real one then! :)

Super toy.

Alan

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