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jmccustomknives

Need help on slotting a hawk handle

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I'm taking part in a collaborative hawk with an artist that is a woodcarver.  I intend on slotting the hawk head about 1 1/2" leaving the top 3" for a carving.  I had thought I could just drill a line but in my experimental tries the oval shape is causing issues with keeping the backside strait.  I do have a drill press with a vice but it doesn't seem to help.   This is intended to be more of an art piece than a user.  Any suggestions?  Thanks in advance.

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Greetings JM,

You might try a Roto-Zip bit in your drill press at a fast speed.. They work great for slotting.. Available at any HD .. Good luck

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim

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I'm not sure if I understand exactly what you are trying to do, but it sounds like you have a holding problem. I've used bondo in the past to "cast" around odd shaped objects so I can more easily fixture them for different operation. You can spray the item with a release agent, or wrap it in foil/plastic etc if you don't want to run the risk of damaging the finish. They also sell low temp casting metals for doing this as well, but usually for a one off project I've found Bondo gives me enough strength for light operation. A simple wood or cardboard box will give you straight sides the vise can grip easily.

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Thanks for the tips.  I ended up starting with a square piece and slotting that then rounding things out.  The roto zip might be the ticket if I ever revisit this style.  While the sides of the piece were fairly flat the drill bit would drift to one side or the other making it impossible to keep things strait.  I ended up scrapping that piece and starting over.

 

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Pictures?

No pic= no proof

No proof= it didn't happen :D

​Now you sound like Judge Judy. You raise a good point though, are there pics?

Frosty The Lucky.

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If you are talking about the drill bit walking you need to sharpen the bit correctly, or get a new one. What size drill are you using?

 

What about slitting and drifting the hole?

 

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I started with 1/8 bits then tried 3/8 bits, they would just deflect just a little, but when it's through 1 1/2" a degree here and a degree there grows.  I'll be sure and post some pics, didn't think that was important to the conversation.  As far as sharp bits go, I was taught long ago how to sharpen my own bits.  What gave me the idea to pursue this was a little project I did for a primitive hunter.  It got me to thinking about an art piece and since I know a fellow who carves walking sticks I spoke with him about doing it.  Imagine this hawk, full wood handle and carvings running down it.  I might post pics of it when it's done.  Oh, the guy who ordered the one pictured wanted to decorate it himself.

 

 

007_1.jpg

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Hi jm did one similar a while ago i drilled one small hole and shaped a piece of steel same as head i was going to use kept heating the blank in forge and burned through the wood

Chris

 

latest 003.jpg

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Nice hawk Chris.  That's exactly how I intend to do it except that area between the top wrap and handle wrap will be carved and a figure head on the top.  I was afraid to burn it in as I didn't know how it might effect the wood for carving purposes.

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Ah now things make more sense to me now that I can see it. That's why I have a mill.

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Try brad point bits. But the point of sharpening the bits is valad, wood, hard metals and soft meatals benifit from different angles and speeds. But honestly 1/4" + its hard to beat the good old spade bit. The issue with an 1/8" standard bit is than wood, because of grain, and the fact that the rings are harder than the pith wants to grab the bit edge and 1/8 is thin enugh to deflect. 

Mortising chisels are made for just this kind of opperation. Infact one can be made up of flat stock (say 1/4x1/2" if the blade is 1/4") the edge bevel achaly runs opposit of most chisels (the 1/4" side) if you forge the "handle) as a round on can use the drill press (with the power off) to drive the chesel as aposed to a mLet or your hand. Anothe tool of use is a pull saw with no curf, preferably the with of the slot (cut your own saw teath on a peice of stock, tink drywall or job saw with a plunge blade) 

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I agree, 1/8" is just too thin to pilot with. The bit will deflect into the harder material unless it hits at an acute angle, really acute. A wood bit sharpened to wood bit specs would be my choice.

However if I hadn't been really put off by a fellows reaction to my counter offer at a garage sale I'd have a Rotozip and make a jig. I do have a dandy plunge router though and jigging the handle wouldn't be a big deal.

There are a number of ways to slot the handle without resorting to hand tools but there are a number of hand tool options too.

It's not that hard, get your back up Brother, whip that puppy till it dances to your tune.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I agree Charles, I like hand tools.  But I'm also impatient, lol.  I guess in the end it's best to start the slots with the wood squared off. 

Frosty, usually if it dances for me it's because I threw it across the shop out of frustration.:angry:

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But hand  tools are so satisfing to use they are a blast to make!

​S'true and few things are as satisfying as using a tool you made yourself. However if you're making a product then the less time and effort you have to put into it the more profitable it is. Unless of course the customer is paying you hourly.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Don't know how extensive your woodworking tool collection is but if I was going to do very many of those I would set up a small table-router with a jig. You could select a slightly undersize cutter and use small strips of sandpaper to finish-fit the slot. The router would make slotting pretty much instant, perfect and repeatable.

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