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Scranton leaf spring hammer tuning


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Well I finally got the scranton up and running and boy does she run good. I'm still in the tuning phase and had a couple questions for yall. This is the first mechanical hammer I have ran and am wondering if kinetic feed back in the treadle is normal? Another thing I'm running into is my belt that runs threw the ram is sliding to the right. Now this wouldn't be a problem but for the fact my belt clamp is lightly smacking the side of the guide. Any tips on fixing that? 

Here is a pic that kinda shows the belt running to the right. Otherwise shes a beauty and I love her. Thanks all. 

20150524_174942.jpg

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He's talking about the belting from the springs to the ram, not the drive belt.

Is there any type of tightening device on the ram for keeping the belt centered?  If not, you could fashion some "belt clamp stops" on each side of the ram to keep things all centered up.

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I went back and looked at some of your other pics when you got them hammer.

Seems to me the two upright bolts with the two square nuts on each side of the ram are for keeping things centered?

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Black frog, I moved the clamps out to stop them from rubbing against the ram. It was causing a lot of ware on the head. Also do you know how much play I'm allow in the ram guides? Either I'm holding my steel wrong or my ram is floping enough to cause my steel to diamond. I've eliminated as much play as possible,  my only other option is to pull the ram and have the slides built back up and machined down. Unless yall have another idea. 

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Slides need to be straight and parallel to each other every way possible for best performance.  That means front to back, side to side, guides AND ram.  Sliding fits may be found in the Machinery Handbook,  mechanical power hammers are probably ok if anywhere near the loose end of the engineering spectrum.  Crappy guides can be used (and often are) for short term gain but the looser and wackier the more diamond shaped your forging will be and the faster the hammer will wear out for good. 

Tups are easier to machine than frames.

As to the strap, they had those clamps on there for a reason.  Put them back and find a way to keep them from scrubbing.  Try higher tension on the strap.  WAG here.

 

 

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Slides need to be straight and parallel to each other every way possible for best performance.  That means front to back, side to side, guides AND ram.  Sliding fits may be found in the Machinery Handbook,  mechanical power hammers are probably ok if anywhere near the loose end of the engineering spectrum.  Crappy guides can be used (and often are) for short term gain but the looser and wackier the more diamond shaped your forging will be and the faster the hammer will wear out for good. 

Tups are easier to machine than frames.

As to the strap, they had those clamps on there for a reason.  Put them back and find a way to keep them from scrubbing.  Try higher tension on the strap.  WAG here.

 

 

I am afraid to have the tup repaired since it is cast. It would have to be built up with weldment and machined back down. On the left side of the rear slide on the tup it is visibly worn down. How much play am I allowed to have? 

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Start with Pounding Out The Profits and after that Google patent search is your friend.  

Detail photos of worn parts would help with diagnosis.  Ram guides often have shims or smaller contact area on the face plate (the removable part on the front of the hammer, not part of the main frame casting) that can be skimmed to tighten up the fit.  I wasn't suggesting replacing the tup, just machining a few or 10 thousandths off the slides.  YMMV

Edited by Judson Yaggy
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Where would I find said patents? And for what brand should I look for?

 

​If you have the patent # on the machine a google search should turn up the documents including drawings. It won't tune you into manuals, parts lists, etc. but might get you on the road.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Start with Pounding Out The Profits and after that Google patent search is your friend.  

Detail photos of worn parts would help with diagnosis.  Ram guides often have shims or smaller contact area on the face plate (the removable part on the front of the hammer, not part of the main frame casting) that can be skimmed to tighten up the fit.  I wasn't suggesting replacing the tup, just machining a few or 10 thousandths off the slides.  YMMV

Judson, removing existing material is not a option im in favor of. There are shims between the front and back guides on the frame. Due to how the guide is mounted to the frame i fear I have taken all the slack out I can with the shims. I know with the front shims I shimed until it stopped binding. The back are the loosest ones at I'm going tk approximate at .075 with my measurements. I was under the impression with the tensioner on the shackles of the spring is how I tightened the belt. I may have to re wrap with the eyebolt nuts as loose as they go but unless I have concrete instructions that say compress the leafs im warry about doing so. Im not sure if the patent number is on the machine. I will try to post a pic of the badge and see whay yall think. Thanks for all the advice so far!!

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Start with Pounding Out The Profits and after that Google patent search is your friend.  

Detail photos of worn parts would help with diagnosis.  Ram guides often have shims or smaller contact area on the face plate (the removable part on the front of the hammer, not part of the main frame casting) that can be skimmed to tighten up the fit.  I wasn't suggesting replacing the tup, just machining a few or 10 thousandths off the slides.  YMMV

 

20150528_073913.jpg

20150528_073935.jpg

20150528_073831.jpg

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Pics are as follow, first is the rear guides at BDC approx .085 play. Next is front guides approx .030 play. Final is rear guides at TDC .050 play. Its hard to see but on the left side of the tup it is visibly worn. Front looks good. Im not sure shimming less would help in the back unless I shimed in between the frame and the guide as well to angle it in. Let me know what yoy think. 

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