Sign in to follow this  
Kekron

Propane burner choices

Recommended Posts

So I'm working on a propane forge build and I havent decided yet on the burner to use. I am familiar with some of the various designs out there on the net (EZ, sidearm, T Rex, Mongo, Guru, T-Bird), but I'm curious what you guys think. I'd like to try building one first before having to shell out the cash to buy one. I've seen the designs for the EZ but I've heard people say its an outdated design and others out perform it. What about the T-bird? http://anvilsandinkstudios.com/burner.html It seems the T-bird might be a good choice (based on some things I've read), but the design is for a 3/4" burner. Does it scale up to 1"? 

 

My forge design is based on a standard grill propane tank so I estimate my forge chamber volume to be ~500 cu in, suggesting 3/4" burners to be insufficient. So what do you guys think? Whats a decent choice for a venturi burner that I can build in the shop of sufficient size for a 500 cu in forge?

 

Kek.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it actually called the "T Bird" on the web page? That's my old concept drawing for the T burner alright, heck has my name on it. I mount the mig contact tip differently now and if I can buy 1/4" scd. 80 pipe locally I'll do it differently again. Yes it scales up or down easily.

A 1" ejector type burner will bring about 700 cu/in to welding temp and is about 50% overkill for that size forge. Not that I don't like overkill, you can just turn it down however it'll burn 50% more fuel than necessary.

The easy fix is to just put another inch of kaowool in the forge and use the 3/4" burner.

Does it work? Oh you betcha. This is my shop forge in it's first incarnation being freshly incarnated in fact. This is one 3/4" T burner in a volume of approx 350-400 cu/in. The finished forge has four 3/4" T burners and the volume & shape of the forge can be adjusted by jacking the lid up and moving the partition bricks. I've never run more than two at a time for a single chamber.

Frosty The Lucky.

V_V_19_04s.thumb.JPG.04ec40c708ed90187b8

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, Frosty, if you had 1/8" schedule 80 (available from McMaster-Carr or Grainger, I might add) how would you do it differently?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A whopping $2.41 from McMaster-Carr

 

Thick-Wall Black Welded Steel Thread Pipe Nipple

1/8 Pipe Size x 3" Length

4550kp3l.png?ver=1351243346
 
 
Each
 
In stock
$2.41 Each
4550K115
 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You just want the pipe not a nipple. The ID is the correct diameter to tap 1/4"-28 which fits a Tweeko mig contact tip. Then you thread the OD 1/2" fine for most of it's length. The last half inch or so you thread MPT to take the fitting for the supply line.

The center of the T is drilled and tapped 1/2" fine so the jet assembly screws in with a lock nut. The supply line connects to a swivel fitting allowing the jet depth to be adjust micrometrically and locked.

 I could make the assemblies on my lathe easily but it wouldn't be practical for folk who didn't have a lathe. The scd. 80 pipe is easy to thread and tap maintaining alignment with nothing but hand tools.

The drawing shown uses 1/2" lamp rod which is thin wall requiring the fitting to hold the mig tip and the supply line fitting is forced on. The lamp rod is straight pipe thread so the threads are the same tpi but not tapered like the female fitting.

It works but is a little sloppy.

Seeing as the pipe thread on the nipple is the same as straight screw thread a person could just chase one end and continue threading the OD to fit the female thread in the pipe T and tap the same end to accept the mig contact tip.

That'd work and save some time. Probably a good alternative to buying a stick of scd. 80 pipe. Wish I'd seen this earlier, I had to drive to Anchorage today I could've picked up a couple few. Drats.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

Edited by Frosty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Darn it Frost, I wish you had posted this 3 days ago:D!  I just built a 3/4" and a 1" T burner off your old design. I had a 1/4" sch80 nipple in my hand thinking it would work but put it down and tried to stay ad close to you original as I could.  I didn't have lamp rod but I did have a bunch of 1/4" SS tubing and fittings back to 1/4" NPT.  I tapped the back side of the Tees with 1/4NPT and one of the 1/4 NPTx 1/4 Tubing fitting with 1/4-28NF.  Screwed the mig tip into the NPT side of the fitting and screwed that into the tee and then made up another fitting on the other end of the 1/4" tubing to get back to 1/4"NPT .  Boy aint that a paragraph, I think it needs a picture!IMG_1543.thumb.JPG.255759012be929575fe2a

Is it trial and error on how long the tig tip should be or do you have a sweet spot in relation to the Tee?

 

Thanks

Russell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I posted everything I think of I'd have to have my own sub section. Yeah, wouldn't that be entertaining, "Frosty's musings".

Yeah, the jet is too close to the throat. The industry standard set back position for the jet is 1/2" the diameter of the throat. So, 3/8" from the end of the burner tube is a departure point for a 3/4" burner.

The farther back the more air it will entrain and leaner it'll burn. The closer the richer. So you can make yours burn well by using a smaller mig tip diameter. OR do what I do with the lash up I've been using for a few years and just trim the mig tip and debur it.

What dia mig tip are you using? I found 0.035" seemed to work best for me but other guys are all over the charts and building well tuned burners.

Trial and error are how Ron Reil, Mike Porter, my humble self and a number of other guys got designs that work. I think Dave Hammer's method for making the things is maybe the easiest I've seen.

There are a few guys out there making and selling good burners made from other home designs but for the money I'd buy a commercially make one. A lot of the money charged for pro farrier's forges is for the commercial burners, they typically run around the $300.00 range but are FAR better performers.

Frosty The Lucky.

Edited by Frosty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frosty,

 

    I'm using a .035 tip in the 3/4 and a .045 in the 1" burner.

 

Thanks for giving me the set back std.  Ill start playing with that Monday.

 

Russell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frosty,

 

    I'm using a .035 tip in the 3/4 and a .045 in the 1" burner.

 

Thanks for giving me the set back std.  Ill start playing with that Monday.

 

Russell

​Those are what I use for the size burner. 0.025" for 1/2 tube to list all the sizes I've made.

I'm happy to pass along what I can.

Jerry

Edited by Frosty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this