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Cary Brief

0-60 gauge with 0-40 regulator?

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Hello all, just about got all my stuff ready to build my first propane forge - my 0-40 psi regulator and hose came in today. have not been able to find a 0-40 gauge anywhere - does anyone know if I can use a 0-60 gauge? i would think so but I just don't like to guess with fuel gas.    Here is a good reason for testing your lines each time.   I was teaching a casting class this weekend, and when going over who to light the blast furnace, (and testing each fitting with soapy water) we heard gas when we should not have.  someone ran over the lighting line (flexible line) and put a pinhole in it.   had we not checked it could have been bad.   It really showed the students how checking is no joke.  

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I know we've asked you this before but would you please put your general location in the header? It's not a must do and I won't bother you about it again but you might live or work a couple blocks from someone with experience and nobody will know. Exactly that literally has happened more than once here. One fellow lived on the same block I mean like 3-4 houses away and didn't realize it.

The answer to your question is yes, no problem. Heck you can put 60lbs of pressure to a 0-40lb. gauge and it'll only read to 40. A 0-60 gauge just isn't going to read higher than what's in the line. It's no issue at all. Good call asking the question, it's better to ask a question than to find out the hard way.

I do have a criticism though. Did you REALLY lay a propane supply line where someone can drive a vehicle over it?! REALLY?!! :o Good GRIEF MAN! Have someone slap you no fewer than three (3) times with a rubber chicken and sit in a corner for at least 10 minutes.

Bury that line and blockade it so NOBODY can drive so much as a bicycle over it, no hand trucks either, NOTHING. I'm hoping the incident happened outdoors and NOT in the building. If this is in doors reroute the supply line, preferably in professionally installed black iron pipe at least waist high ON a wall. Move the forges if you have to, there shouldn't be more than say 6'-10' of flexible hose directly from the pipe and reg to the forge.

I know there will be a raft of guys testifying how they've never had a leak and they have xx feet of rubber hose laying on the floor. You listen to whoever and do what you want but I STRONGLY recommend you not take any chances with propane.

Sorry if that comes across as a rant but this is life and death serious business.

Frosty The Lucky.

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And acetylene can explode if you drive over a line so I'm on the "armour all gas lines subject to idiocy" side of things...Warning students that they are moving hot steel toward the propane line is rather common in my experience....

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Strongly second and third the above statements.   Another point is that if other people are going to be around your installation you should be hard piping your set up. It sounds like you are using a back yard BBQ  regulator.   I know that many people have gotten away for years using them but like all consumer products they are subject to failure at unexpected moments.  For your safety and those around you please go to your industrial gas supplier and purchase the quality of regulator use in oxy/propane cutting rigs.  They are better at delivering  and controlling gas flows and come equipped with the correct gauges.

 

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