redd1981

Should be ready to go tommorow.

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 First and foremost thank you to everyone who has ever contributed info to this site.

 SOOOOO.......

 I got my forge put together..

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Got my RR anvil ready to go...

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And have some hammers (just dressed all the faces today), material and some lump charcoal...

006.jpg

 

 I cant wait to get to bangin around. Im pretty convinced the first thing Im going to make is a simple small coal rake from the rebar. Any suggestions as what to try to make next judging by the stock in the coffee can?

Edited by redd1981

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1)  Build a small fire from sticks in order to dry out the forge slowly.

2)  Get a bigger coffee can. A 5 gallon bucket, or two, is about right for starters. (grin)

3)  Pull the hot cut out of the hole and lay it flat beside the anvil when not in use.

Edited by Glenn

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Thanks , the forge will be drying overnight and into tomorrow but I will light a small fire with twigs and things just in case. I only did a tad bit on the cross pein. I will have to address that.

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The sharp pein makes deap marks, some times the "humps" fold over instead of flaten out, blunt peins make wider, shawlower valleys, and the resulting hils are easy to flaten. I have some 3# hammers that have radie aproching 2", i realy like using them over the horn or face to draw hot steel. The marks easaly planish out. 

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Those big nails will make nice hooks.  Use the nail head as the end of the hook that you bend up. You could make a leaf on the pointed end of the nail. Flatten the nail shaft a bit and punch (or drill) a couple of screw holes.

My experience with RR spike knives has been disappointing, but your mileage might vary.

Have a bucket of water and either a small can on a handle or bundle of rags on a handle to wet down the charcoal around the outer edges of the fire. A charcoal fire wants to spread and you have to keep it contained with the water.

You are off to a good start.

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I take it you mixed the liner like mud. Expect it to shrink check as it dries or is it some kind of cement mix? If you hang a light bulb close over it it'll really help it dry by warming it above ambient temp.

The RR spike makes nice fire tools and allows a nice decorative twist, the spike head at the back of the handle section lets people see what the original stock was. People, the maker included likes to be able to recognize the origins it helps make the transformation really stand out. It makes for pleasurable viewing and handling.

The spikes can also make heavy duty wall hooks but garden tools are a good choice. Make something for the wife, they have to love anything we make for them you know.

The big nails make nice smaller wall hooks, the existing heads make good hook finials so coats, etc. can't get torn.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks for the advice. That 3lb cross pein actually feels heavy and awkward could I maybe try wrapping the handle with scrap leather or something? the handle just seems too skinny. The 2 1/2lb drilling hammer with the fatter handle seems just about right for me.

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looks a like your about ready to have some fun!!  I second what Glen Said about laying down the hot cut.  As soon as I saw it I could just feel my knuckles getting caught between it and a hammer handle being swung at full speed :wacko: 

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wow your advice is coming faster that I can post replies to everyone.

The mud I used was just a bag of top soil I had and some water. Totally free and totally removable and re-doable until I find what works for me and then maybe I can get a better type of cement/mortar.

Also I plan on using the broken hose head I have to deliver a steady trickle to a local drenching as needed. I found it works great when trying to slow smoke pork and keep your fire under control. BUT that is with briquettes so I plan on being plenty busy!

Edited by redd1981

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Nice setup, I started with a nearly identical setup a grill with a refactory lining and a rr track anvil. Small fire will dry it out, I forged with it still slightly wet, if it's just refactory cement you will get some cracking but won't be an issue can always patch the cracks if you like but it will get you goin I only upgraded to a "55 forge" because my grill was pretty rickety. 

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Handle size is personal preference. In my 1st forging class I had issues with the big handles they had on the cross peen hammers the school had. I swing a hammer pretty regularly doing construction, but I had a nice set of blisters in some odd places on my hand where I usually don't get blisters, after about 2 hours swinging those hammers. I have smaller than usual hands and usually have to special order a medium size glove for welding, though some of the small ones will also fit me. I actually went out to the work truck and spent the rest of the day forging with my 2 lb drilling sledge that fits me better. Next morning I swung by the contractors supply I deal with on the way to class and picked up 3 or 4 different handles that fit my hand better so I could re handle an old cross peen I'd picked up at a yard sale. Once I had a hammer that fit me well, I didn't have any issues with blisters that whole week.

 

In some cases I've taken a rasp or sand paper to handles to fit them a bit better vs rehandling them.

Edited by DSW

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Harbor Freight has the same style 2 pound cross pein for under $10. Grind the pein end as mentioned above. The difference in weight will be easier to use. Use sandpaper to remove any glaze before you use the hammer.

Use a wider board under the front feet of the forge. Keep a 5 gallon bucket of fresh water by the forge, just in case.  Did anyone mention safety glasses and ear plugs?

 

wow your advice is coming faster that I can post replies

You said you wanted to build a fire in the morning so we had to hurry in getting you the information. (grin)

 

Edited by Glenn

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Thanks again for the advice everyone.

 

I have been to both HF locations near me and the 3 lb is all I have seen.Im thinking a 2 lb German pattern  maybe in my future,

 

Also I have all the safety gear I need. I have been doing stock removal for a few years now. and have been doing lawncare and landscaping for about 14 yrs, I ALWAYS have safety  glasses on and hearing protection when needed.

Edited by redd1981

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Handle size is personal preference. In my 1st forging class I had issues with the big handles they had on the cross peen hammers the school had. I swing a hammer pretty regularly doing construction, but I had a nice set of blisters in some odd places on my hand where I usually don't get blisters, after about 2 hours swinging those hammers. I have smaller than usual hands and usually have to special order a medium size glove for welding, though some of the small ones will also fit me. I actually went out to the work truck and spent the rest of the day forging with my 2 lb drilling sledge that fits me better. Next morning I swung by the contractors supply I deal with on the way to class and picked up 3 or 4 different handles that fit my hand better so I could re handle an old cross peen I'd picked up at a yard sale. Once I had a hammer that fit me well, I didn't have any issues with blisters that whole week.

 

In some cases I've taken a rasp or sand paper to handles to fit them a bit better vs rehandling them.

​I hope you don't mind my suggesting you consider ordering hammer handles from househandle.com. They are cheaper there than anywhere else I have ever seen.  

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​I hope you don't mind my suggesting you consider ordering hammer handles from househandle.com. They are cheaper there than anywhere else I have ever seen.  

​Not at all. I saved the link on my computer after looking them up. I'm always looking for new places to get things.You never know when you might need some thing the regular place doesn't carry. I'm lucky enough that my contractors supply house stocks a reasonable selection of handles. They handle a lot of landscape supply stuff, so the  grass hopping knuckle heads are always breaking handles. I do occasionally run across old tools they don't stock handles for and I have to adapt what I can find.

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​ They handle a lot of landscape supply stuff, so the  grass hopping knuckle heads are always breaking handles.

​HEY!! I resemble that remark. :D

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I see you have a nice little brass or copper hammer in the bunch. That copper hammer makes an excellent hammer for cutting hot metal on your cutting hardy in the hole. The soft copper face won't damage the edge of your cutting hardy.  Any good sharp edge will work for a cutting hardy. My cutting hardy is a log splitting wedge I lock into the vise. It all works ..... Keep an eye out at flea markets and garage sales for some good files you can get cheaply. You might even come across a few more hammer heads !!

Ohio Rusty ><>

The Ohio Frontier Forge

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 Yes I brought out the brass hammer for exactly that. I just finished and I will post some pictures and talk about a few things I learned later after I settle down,have a shower and a few proper drinks.

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ok well I got a couple hours in on that bag of charcoal, most of it was spent pouring water on the fire to think about what it is I am supposed to be doing.

The first 5-10 minutes were kind of sketchy but after I saw what was beginning to happen under my hammer,it was exhilarating and turned out to be one of the most gratifying experiences I have ever had. I now understand why people are so passionate about this craft.

 

I started out making the fire rake,then I put the 3 pair of hose pliers to 90 deg so I could twist the stock easier,then made the hook and then went to make a second hook and realized I had limited fuel left so I decided to spend the rest on drawing out and tapering. There is a nail next to the long one for reference.

001_1.jpg

 

A few things I learned today:

You guys make it look easy.

Black steel will still burn the xxxx out of your hands.

The 3lb hammer was not as heavy when my adrenaline was pumping.

The blow dryer even on low is a bit too much air.

You can drench a charcoal fire and not worry about it going out. the fire is simply just waiting patiently in the bottom of the firepot for you to figure out what to do and turn the air flow back on and bring it back to life.

Small hammers work better for the smaller stuff, DUH!!

This a great arm and shoulder workout.

I should have bought the on/off foot pedal while I was at HF.

I could go on but I will stop there.

One question for now..when I started drawing out the second nail I noticed some yellow smoke and it turn my coals yellow....were these nails galvanized? I pulled them out of a burn pile and figured any zinc would have burned off but maybe they didn't get hot enough? the wind was at my back pretty much the whole day and I feel fine but has anyone had this happen?

 

 

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Yellow, and white whispy tails usually mean galvanized. Some folks use vinegar to remove it. I would probably toss them into a hot fire ,and come back after awhile. 

Your projects look pretty good for hammer control. As for the hook, how are you going to hammer it in with that rounded corner?  Look up some videos on making a spring type hold down, some will make them with a sharp square corner by upsetting that area during forging.

 

Don't overlook wood waste for fuel, and it doesn't have to be converted to charcoal first. Think of it as a small campfire that gets a good bed of coals going at the bottom.

Chunks of 2x4's , branches, etc will work.

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I use the 1' long large nails to make cubicle hooks, flatten the pointy end until it's about 8" of flat  1/8"  or slightly less thick.

Then find a piece of stock or sq tubing the thickness of the cubicle wall and fasten it securely in the vise horizontally.

Heat the flattened part and place the pointy end alongside of the tube and visegrip it and then bend around 3 sides of the tube tapping with your hammer while pulling with your tongs.

Flip it around and heat the end with the head and bend to a nice curve.  Wirebrush, let cool and spray with something like rustoleum.

Take it to work and hang your coat or laptop bag/backpack on it.  Start taking orders from all your coworkers. (I'm up to 27 of them where I work some folks getting two...)

Edited by ThomasPowers

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You can move the hair dryer back so it is aimed at the pipe so only part of air makes it to the fire.their is a sweet spot wherefuel consumption is reasnable. And yes you can "coke" wood with  bottom blast 

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I was given a pair of those pliers by a friend of mine and tried to do a set of scrolling tongs out of them for him. I wasn't really satisfied with them because of how much flex there was in them.

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