b4utoo

Cergol Hammers Bronze Color, how to?

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Does he brush them with a bronze brush when hot ??

Ohio Rusty ><>

The Ohio Frontier Forge

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Natural color from the heat treating process of the hammer head. The color will indicate the temp of the head when quenched during the tempering.

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Natural color from the heat treating process of the hammer head. The color will indicate the temp of the head when quenched during the tempering.

​Just to avoid confusion, stopping the temper isn't quenching. I know it's a nit picky detail but it IS part of the technical language of Blacksmithing and heat treating we need to keep straight so folk understand what we're talking about. Yeah, craft related technical jargon. but it has it's place and we need to observe it when applicable.

Quenching "proper" is from critical temperature for the alloy and purpose. I believe chilling from temper colors to draw the desired properties or to prevent tools from reaching tempering temperatures and  avoid heat damage is or was called "Slaking" Eg. the Slake or slack tub. It's probably another example of how blacksmithing terms entered every day use Eg. slake your thirst or quench your thirst. AND, let's not let modern vernacular re-enter blacksmithing technical language / jargon/ and add to the confusion.

Oh I do hope that doesn't muddy the crick more than it already is. :rolleyes:

Frosty The Lucky.

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Frosty, your right - colors are shown by polishing the face of the hammer after quenching at criticle temp then heating to color of your choice for tempering then cooled to stop the running of colors. I typed to quick earlier.

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Im greener than green. Im still trying to figure out tempering. hardening. cooling in oil, cooling in water. I swear it gets more and more confusing. 

Put it in oil. Don't put it in oil Put it in water, don't put it in water.....cool it quickly, let it cool slowly...cool it in oven...cool it in sand...cool it on forge...let it air cool..

A bit over whelming.

I NEED BLACKSMITHING FOR DUMMIES!!!

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Bee 4 You two,

Slow down, grab a cup of your favorite tainted water. Read this Book!!!!!!! There is soooooooooo much information on this site.

Still Air cools slowest, Brine cools fastest. Every other choice is in between. Just nod your head like a woodpecker and say "Uh-Huh".

See how easy it is. Steel with your eyes, nobody will charge you with THEFT. Let your fingers think out loud and nobody will help you.

What is $.02 if you have to round it up or down??

Neil

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Many hammer makers quench in water as the considerable mass and, mostly, chunky profiles slow the cooling effects enough for the medium carbon alloys that are most used to harden without cracking.  I like to temper my hammers by baking slowly on top of my coal fire, turning often, till a pale blue temper color appears.  A quick dip (slake) in water then stops the colors running.  

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