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William Foster anvil, made in England.  One of the few anvils that were dated with the year they were made.  This one was bought at an auction in 2015.  It is an 0 3 6 = 90 lb.  Dated 1833.  Does anyone know what the WW stand for under the date?  This anvil is in pretty good condition.  Some of these early English built-up anvils were prone to break on the forge weld lines.  I have another Foster that is missing the heal, broken at the hardy hole area.IMG_20150301_121939708.thumb.jpg.41d3c4dIMG_20150301_121949129.thumb.jpg.92edd08

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My 1828 WF is also missing it's heel and most of the face too.   I hope  to someday try the old fashioned repair for the face and Postman suggested I try forgewelding the face to a wrought iron plate and then weld wrought iron to wrought iron as the WF used a fairly low grade of WI.

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Love my 1816. Broken heel and all. The WWs continue on them well into the 1840s, and Postman suggested they may be an inspector stamp. Mine's a big C instead, but a little older. 

Is that the faint hint of an anchor I see? Mine has one....might not be clear without rubbing a little flour or baby powder into it.

Decent rebound, and VERY quiet when staples are tight (and loud as heck when they're not...).

 

NTM7.JPG

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Here is my only William Foster, dated 1851, 2-0-25 on the off side for weight which works out to 249 LBS. I have owned it for a while it is 5-1/2" wide face and 25-1/2" long. A stocky anvil with a big sweet spot to work on. It is in quite good shape for 164 years old. It has been used for what it was meant for, for many years, I'm sure a smith or two made a living with this William Foster. It was -15 F in the shop this morning once again so I only took one picture which I hope I attached correctly. It has a great rebound and ring and any smith, this one included, can't help but feel proud to work on this one. It seems to have the letters IH stamped below the logo. I have no idea what the letter stamps mean, perhaps inspection marks?

Cheers

DSC00490.JPG

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Direwolf    That is a nice BIG Foster.  What I am most impressed with these and other forged anvils is how well they maintained the overall shape, no matter what the size.  The proportionality and standardization of shape is amazing considering the methods they had available to use.  I take my hat off to these unsung craftsmen of another era.

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  • 6 years later...
  • 3 weeks later...

I have my great great ....grandfathers anvil it is a William Foster 1836 - grandfather was a blacksmith and a judge in Cherokee county Georgia - Judge Joseph Donaldson 1807 -1892 - he was also a founder of Canton Georgia he built the marble courthouse there it still stands today  - I'm not sure how to post a pic of the anvil  , the furnace he built in 1860 the anvil reads  William Foster 1836 wt on the other side it's got the numbers 032 - 

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At the bottom of the dialog box where you type your reply there is a hyperlink "choose files..." if you click that it should open up a second window where you can select your images. Once you click open the images will appear in a tray below your reply. If you click an image it will be inserted into your message wherever your cursor is at the time. 

You can resize the image before submitting by double clicking it in your message and changing size field.

Welcome aboard! It's very cool to know the history of your anvil so well. Looking forward to seeing it.

 

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Probably:  0    3    2   that's the weight in the old CWT system: 0x112 + 3x28 + 2   Does it weigh around 86 pounds?

(Old anvils tend to be a couple of pounds off from their stamped weight when weighed on a modern calibrated scale.)

I have an 1828 WF; but it's severly damaged and spends most of the time sitting with my "wall of shame abused anvils" 

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Great to have the history of your anvil. Are you still located in Cherokee County GA ? If so add it to your profile and you may be surprised how many members are near enough to make contact with you. You might want to edit your post and change the font's to match the standard forum font and save a moderator from doing that. Changing the standard font is frowned upon.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Welcome aboard, glad to have you. If you'll put your general location in the header you might be surprised how many members live within visiting distance. Do you have a nick name, name, etc. we may address you with? Your login is a tongue tangle that transfers to my fingers.

I'm not sure what you were trying to do but what you did worked nicely. 

Pretty nice old lady you have there, she's got lots of life in her with a little care and use. I HOPE you aren't thinking of "restoring" her, especially not with a grinder or welder!  Any steel you grind off the face is gone forever and you can't run an arc bead on the face without risking serious damage to the hardened steel face.

forging hot steel will smooth and shine up her face nicely. There are plenty of un-chipped edges to use, just avoid heavy blows on them. If you need a better edge weld a square shank to a piece of steel for a bottom tool and you're home free.

Frosty The Lucky.

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