Toothygrin

High dex work gloves

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 Ok I know most smiths don't wear work gloves and I don't like to wear them. but here is why I do. When my shop is 20 degrees and all my punches are cold and even my hammer handles are cold and I am without a stove, I like to have something on my hands to keep the slightly less, well cold. I can't stand however wearing fire gloves, it's like wearing a bag on my hands and they feel like they get in the way more then they help anything. So my question is this are there any high dex work gloves you can buy that are fire resistant and don't have a tag on them that states do not wear next to fires?  

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Motorcycle gloves, the kind without finger tips.  Allow for dexterity while still keeping your hands warm, I used to wear them riding all the time. 

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Last time I was in horse country (Napa, CA, don't laugh) the local flea, along with rounding hammers, were good quality work gloves with the fingertips cut off and stitched.  I'd been doing this to my work gloves for years now.

Bought 3 pair, seller said they were "roper's gloves" but I may have misunderstood her.

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Being military, I'm forced to wear gloves at nearly all times. Forging is a situation where I prefer not to, as that is how I was taught. I do like a tighter fit when it comes to gloves, as with all of my uses, I need flexibility, protection and dexterity. Loading rounds into a magazine in subzero temps with barehands is foolish, doing it with the wrong gloves loses time. I like cutting and stitching the figertips from typically the thumb, and index, occasionally the middle fingers. "Mechanix" brand is fairly decent if you find the right type, but Oakley, Wiley X, and Under Armour have wonderful gloves. With the flame protection, look into the nomex/fire retardant gloves. Keep in mind that these gloves are not cheap, but do the trick.

As far as low cost, HWooldridge and Michael have the right idea... Leather work gloves, close fitting and preferably with a wrist draw string or half sleeve to keep any hot items from falling into the glove (Trust me, you DO NOT want that to happen!)

 

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Tillman makes a full range of various weight leather welders and drivers gloves that would be safe to do hot work in, in sizes up to XXL. They even make mechanics gloves that are safe to weld in: kevlar stitching and no spandex.

http://jtillman.com/products/gloves/truefit/1488/

 

Edited by John McPherson

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Rock climbing gloves. I've used Metolius gloves for years. They seem to have become hard to find in the last year however, and I may have to go on a major search for a new brand.

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Also being in the military and having similar situations or working with C-wire or anything I've taken to working with nomex gloves that I cut off about 1/3 of the finger length but my palms are protected when working with shorter pieces that the dragons breath heats to a bit more than I'm comfortable with. These are similar to a pair I work in (http://www.mcguirearmynavy.com/US-GI-USMC-Nomex-Gloves.html )and I enjoy them and they have saved my from many a burn from slips or thoughtless touching. I also was issued smalls when i needed mediums which is why i originally cut the finger tips off, but now they are my go to gloves for everything except cold weather. I second the rock climbing gloves, belaying gloves are sturdy and they come with full finger or fingerless, but I've never forged in them seeing as my nomex are thoroughly fire resistant.

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There are knit Kevlar gloves which are fire resistant.  I believe Blacksmith Depot carries them.

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Also being in the military and having similar situations or working with C-wire or anything I've taken to working with nomex gloves that I cut off about 1/3 of the finger length but my palms are protected when working with shorter pieces that the dragons breath heats to a bit more than I'm comfortable with. These are similar to a pair I work in (http://www.mcguirearmynavy.com/US-GI-USMC-Nomex-Gloves.html )and I enjoy them and they have saved my from many a burn from slips or thoughtless touching. I also was issued smalls when i needed mediums which is why i originally cut the finger tips off, but now they are my go to gloves for everything except cold weather. I second the rock climbing gloves, belaying gloves are sturdy and they come with full finger or fingerless, but I've never forged in them seeing as my nomex are thoroughly fire resistant.

​I've used my Wiley X gloves as oven mitts on multiple occasions. lol.

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There are knit Kevlar gloves which are fire resistant.  I believe Blacksmith Depot carries them.

​I tried those and found that I don't like the stretch and snag. The stretch makes gripping harder. The snag is annoying when trying to hold any rusty or otherwise rough metal.

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Go to your local welding supply store and buy some welders gauntlets.  Should have lots of sizes, get some that are snug.  They should bemade of just leather no insulation. It's what I wear all winter.  Buckskin is nice but doesn't hold up well.  Hang in there winter is almost over!

 

Edited by saskuatch83

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 Ok I know most smiths don't wear work gloves and I don't like to wear them. but here is why I do. When my shop is 20 degrees and all my punches are cold and even my hammer handles are cold and I am without a stove, I like to have something on my hands to keep the slightly less, well cold. I can't stand however wearing fire gloves, it's like wearing a bag on my hands and they feel like they get in the way more then they help anything. So my question is this are there any high dex work gloves you can buy that are fire resistant and don't have a tag on them that states do not wear next to fires?  

I do not think there is a perfect solution, the human hand is difficult to improve on.

The only real answer is to heat your workspace so that all the tools are at room temperature... As that is not an option for most of us I suspect, any thing we do is bound to be a compromise.

​Over the years I tried various gloves and still use a number depending on what the activity is, one type does not do all. I found the kevlar ones were generally a waste of space due to the snagging mentioned above, and that they soaked up any oil or water I was using and held it against your skin….a drawback with any woven/non-leather type glove. The ones I had were not much of an advantage over rigger or TIG gloves as far as feel goes either.

I could never get fingerless mitts to be comfortable, they were either too bulky between the fingers and safety-wise you were adding ten more catch points to your extremities. If you needed to put on full leather gloves for a process you had to faff around taking the mitts off.

The thing that I have found the most practical and effective way to keep my hands warm when working, are old wool rich socks cut off at the ankle and worn on the wrists like the leg-warmers worn by the "Kids from Fame". They bunch up between sleeve and thumb base and don't get in the way of sensitive operations. you can put other gloves on and off without having to move them.

You may look a bit weird but you will be more comfortable.

It is very cheap to try the idea for yourself...

Alan

Edited by Alan Evans

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I stay away from gloves it is to hot here in Florida. But I would use the welding gloves of thin leather work gloves. An other choice is weld handles to all your punches. Get a good propane heater for the shop.

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