Spruce

1909 Fisher Anvil...

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Picked up this anvil in Cortez, NM, yesterday. Was on my way back from visiting family - managed to wrestle it in the back of our Honda Pilot... There's a hidden cubby thing with all the gear to change a flat tire, jump start, etc. in the back of the Pilot - the weight of the anvil cracked the panel which hides that/makes the bottom of the trunk. Also tore a big gash in the fabric on the back of the seats which were laid flat. Definitely not the ideal vehicle for hauling an anvil. I'm very lucky my wife loves me...

 

In another thread it was suggested this might be a plow anvil - does that look correct? Any guesses as to the weight?

 

As you can see it's in decent condition mostly, except for a couple of chips and that one obviously huge missing chunk of the face. I will use as is for now, but hopefully one day repair that area (will do all the research first - Gunther method I think it was called?)

 

Also got 2 post vices with the deal. Anyway, here are the pics:

 

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Yes, it is a FISHER plowmaker's anvil.  These were used for a number of years until changing technology rendered the re-pointing/sharpening of these obsolete. 

 

The missing chunk will not preclude using this anvil.  There is plenty of surface area and edges to work with.  Repairing this is not easy.  You might just want to leave it alone.

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Thanks njanvilman. Very cool to know what it is I've got.

 

Can you enlighten me as to how the large step and 45 on the step were useful for plow sharpening/making?

 

I plan on using it just like it is for quite a while to come - I have projects much more pressing than the repair of that face. But, I imagine I'll undertake it one day, if I think I'm able. I'm no stranger to welding, of most different types, so the actual laying of the bead doesn't phase me. Rather, the proper pre-heating, maintaining temp, post-heating, etc. seems like the tricky part to get right. In any case, if I ever try it, I'll do a lot of research first, and it's a ways off.

 

Also, I have a Mousehole with chipped edges I'd like to repair, although I can live with it the way it is if I think it will be too difficult. And, I have a Peter Wright, with not only chipped/mushroomed edges, it's just dead as a door nail - has nowhere near as good a rebound as my Mousehole, and neither are as good as this Fisher. So, I have no qualms about working on the Peter Wright, as it's got almost the same rebound properties as a random hunk of metal right now. I'd love to go at it with the appropriate rods and try to get some life back into it.

 

Spruce

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Also, any guesses at the weight? I'm hopefully going to get to somewhere with a scale one of these days, just for my own edification.

 

And, any idea what any of the markings mean? In particular, the 4 dots stamped into the one foot?

 

Spruce

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The anvil should be about 200/250 lbs.  I will weigh mine tomorrow.

 

The L III and dots were codes used by the moldmakers.  They have no real significance.  They are very common to many Fisher anvils of this time frame.

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I believe that my Plowmaker's is identical to yours. 

 

Here are my numbers to compare:   Height: 13",  Overall length: 28", Top width: 4 1/4", Horn length from the flat to the tip: 10".

 

The weight as shown on my scale is about 196 lb.   No fancy geometry, scales, ratios, latin terminology.  All you had to do was ask, and I answered.

 

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Greetings Josh, I like all the footprints in the snow .. Took a while to get it to the scale ? They say the east coast is frozen in and lots of snow... Maybe that's why I see you on IFI a lot. Plus your wife as is mine is on another adventure. Forge on and make beautiful things Jim

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Wife is home now.  Yes, just too cold to do much outside.  Worst part is we have had a lot of warm/freeze cycles, and now the snow is hiding the ice.  I do not venture out back much.  No worth a fall.  We are about to get the cold air that you have now.  How long till spring?

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Wow njanvilman - looks like you went to a lot of work on my behalf. Traipsing through snow, carrying that anvil around, rigging it up and everything else - much appreciated! You have gone above and beyond!

 

Spruce

 

PS do you use that particular anvil much? Like it?

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Going to drop into the single digits in Dixie tonight, snow still on the ground. If I get my sights on that groundhog he is going to look like a whiffle ball.

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Wow njanvilman - looks like you went to a lot of work on my behalf. Traipsing through snow, carrying that anvil around, rigging it up and everything else - much appreciated! You have gone above and beyond!

 

Spruce

 

PS do you use that particular anvil much? Like it?

 

Thank you.  I do not use that anvil at all.  It is part of the Fisher & Norris Factory Museum collection.  The most comprehensive FISHER collection.  I use a 300 lb Fisher in my shop.  The others are in the museum.

 

Did the dimensions of mine match yours?  The anvils look identical and were probably  made from the same pattern.  I do not have that pattern in the collection; I wish I did.

 

My anvil weighs in at 196.  Fisher probably intended them to be 200 lbs +/-.  Not many Fisher anvils are their exact  advertised weight.

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Wow njanvilman - looks like you went to a lot of work on my behalf. Traipsing through snow, carrying that anvil around, rigging it up and everything else - much appreciated! You have gone above and beyond!

 

 

It's slippery out. A 200 lb anvil is good for traction. LOL

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Actually the anvil was already outside "aging".  A previous owner had ground the top, and I did not like the contrast to the worn sides.  So I have had it outside for a few months in the rain to get a bit rusty and weathered.  I just added the scale to the hoist, and lifted it up for the weight.  It is still hanging there today.

 

I do not pick up 200 lb anvils anymore.  I limit myself to about 100-150 lb. Hydraulics and chain hoists to the heavies.

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I prefer using something that doesn't have quite as much "punch" to it for traction myself, say sandbags.

 

I've heard of the well tempered clavier; now the well seasoned anvil?

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