Glenn

Tell us your 'don't do that again' moments

Recommended Posts

My favorite don't do that again moment was the time I decided to see what would happen if I put a golf ball on the flat dies of the power hammer, and stomped the treadle...Right into my guts at 300mph.

 

A friend and I tried to break one open as a kid with a hammer. I don't know if it was the hammer or the ball that caught me as I was unconscious afterwards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own dozens of tape measures.  They are everywhere, in all my vehicles, shops, house.  Why can't I ever find one when I need one?

 

I must have at least 4 tapes on the truck and 6 utility knives. When I need one I can never locate one. Then a week later they all miraculously reappear from some wheres.

 

I've taken to stocking critical work tools in pairs at a minimum and back ups for when I can't locate those. I bet if I ever get the chance to completely strip the work truck and locate all the missing stuff that's gotten taken off in a hurry, I can lighten the truck by close to 1000 lbs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I must have at least 4 tapes on the truck and 6 utility knives. When I need one I can never locate one. Then a week later they all miraculously reappear from some wheres.

 

I've taken to stocking critical work tools in pairs at a minimum and back ups for when I can't locate those. I bet if I ever get the chance to completely strip the work truck and locate all the missing stuff that's gotten taken off in a hurry, I can lighten the truck by close to 1000 lbs.

Hmm, only three of each critical tool?  With some of my tools I have many more.  Tool kit for the house, trucks, each of three shops, and multiple of tools in each of the shops.  Someday there will be a hellofa sale here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need to make an inventory of all my tools and put what the value of each so when my wife starts selling it off after I die she can get what it is worth rather than what I told her I paid for it.

 

Now that is a very wise statement!  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the missing tape measures have a secret life with the orphan socks.

Do not, I repeat, NOT put your tapes in the dryer!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm reminded of my multi meters. When Deb and I were building the house I used my multi meter frequently and clearly remember setting it down on a 2x6 block in a basement wall with a pack of smokes and Zippo on it. I looked for that multi meter, Zippo AND  smokes for a week before giving up and buying a new multi meter, I'd already replaced the smokes & Zippo of course. Several months later I put the multi meter away where I wouldn't lose it, on a 2x6 block in the basement right NEXT to the other one, pack of smokes & Zippo. I went so far as to mark it with a piece of flagging and put the Zippo in my pocket.

 

My most recent multi meter lives in the tool box I dedicated to electrical tools and bits. Personally I think a dimensional gate opens when you set a tool down and take your eyes off it and the tool, part, or other necessary bit awaits us in another dimension till we buy a replacement.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Inventory---pictures really help as your heirs may not know a lefthanded butcher from a slitting chisel. Now with cheap digital cameras you can burn it all to a disk and make a copy for the safe deposit box as well as the house---offsite backup is a total waste of time until you need it and then it's solid gold studded with large diamonds! It's tempting to take a shortcut when we're under time pressure, tired, etc; but those are the times I try to be extra safe as I know I'm more likely to goof things up and nothing trashes a schedule like and ER run and not being able to work in the shop for a week or 6... Last night I was working with a lad on his first knife with 3 other new smiths working at the same time on other projects. He was making an eating knife from a section of flat high carbon sewer snake, (hey I got 100' of it for US$7...and if anything can live through *GLOWING* it's already too late, shoot prions don't even make it through *GLOWING*...). As my usual wont for folks past driving age I was making one in parallel to him making one. It was cold out and I wanted to show him about hot rasping and had NOT warmed the postvise up. Thin hot stock, Cold Vise. So the expected happened and my lesson about prewarming tools when working high C alloys in cold weather sunk in deeper. I was also able to show him how to detect cracks and I went ahead and quenched it in water and showed him the testing of a piece of scrap for suitability of blade making and how to test for heat treating process. Embarrassing but a good learning experience and I did get to hammer it into tiny shards that can be hidden away...but I will probably throw them in the next scrapmascus billet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

-J: You REALLY need to turn pulling ANY chuck key you aren't twisting into a reflex. Poking your own eye out would be a bummer but what if a kid turns the drill press on and loses an eye? How'd that make you feel?

Frosty The Lucky.



Lucky for me young children arent allowed in my shop just big dumb adult children! Its not like the key stays in the chuck when not in use, it just never fails that i get side tracked by something falling or the piece isnt sitting right in the press vise.. Fortunately I'm right handed and its never once made it full circle! Theres a nice block wall and shelving units for the darn thing to hit and get lost behind. (sheepish grin)

-J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need to make an inventory of all my tools and put what the value of each so when my wife starts selling it off after I die she can get what it is worth rather than what I told her I paid for it.


that's too funny because its too true!

-J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My drill press chuck key was hung on one of those retractable keychain reels, clipped on to the belt housing.  I'd tighten the chuck, pull out the key and let go, the reel would handle the rest. 

 

replacement DP has a keyless chuck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need to make an inventory of all my tools and put what the value of each so when my wife starts selling it off after I die she can get what it is worth rather than what I told her I paid for it.


I like how he put "what I TOLD her I paid for it"... a case of "What Mama don't know won't hurt me?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it isn’t red don't hit it. Well at least don’t hit it hard.

I’ve hit a piece of coiled spring hard when it was too cold and it jumped back and hit me in the face.

Busted lip and a red mark across my face, luckily no scars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After Installing a 24' smoke stack on my forge and then cranking my blower like I normally did prior to having a stack.   The stack drew air through the forge even when I was not cranking on the blower.  This kept my fire hotter between heats.     This was just after installing the stack.   I cranked on the blower like normal trying to get a real good heat and pulled next to nothing out of the fire.  

 

After installing the stack I needed to recallibrate big time.   But less black buggers and black stuff in my hair is a great thing!  

 

BTW.   Prior to the 24' stack I had nothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My drill press chuck key was hung on one of those retractable keychain reels, clipped on to the belt housing.  I'd tighten the chuck, pull out the key and let go, the reel would handle the rest. 

 

replacement DP has a keyless chuck.

I use a drill press stand with a hand drill that can be removed. I taped the key to the cable. As soon as I let go of the key it jumps away.

My previous lathe had keys with a coil spring. they also jumped out as soon as I let go of it.

In the future I will only buy keyless chucks.

Göte.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't injured myself in anyway yet but I have learned I have reflexes like a cat! I was heating up a piece of round bar that was just a little too long to be left without being held and I turned around. Next thing I know my boyfriend is yelling look out as a red hot piece of metal comes falling at me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, you've got my attention, boyfriend is yelling and red hot steel is falling at you. . . THEN WHAT!?
 
Reflexes like a CAT you say? Did you stop for a smug wash because you intended that to happen? Go lay down on someone's jigsaw puzzle?  Catch a bug? Chase a leaf? Suddenly fall asleep in a sunbeam?
 
Oh my imagination fails me, let me off the hook, PLEASE. What happened THEN?
 
Kidding aside, glad you weren't hurt. You've stumbled onto the origin of the old saying, "Keep your eye on the iron in the fire", those things can get away from you.
 
You DO realize you're going to get burns, bruises, lose a little blood, etc. occasionally. Yes?
 
Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ninja rolled out of the way, obviously. Yes, I realize I will get hurt at some point...maybe. I spend so much time telling nick to be careful and to stop hurting himself that I have to be extra careful, so you know I can set a good example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good I was afraid you had climbed your boyfriends body leaving bloody claw marks everywhere---that's what my cats tend to do when startled...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My goodness Thomas, how could I have forgotten THAT cat reflex!?

 

(FYI) Ninja rolls only work if there isn't anything HOT, sharp or pointy on the floor. I prefer a right smart jig for getting out of the way of falling, flying, bouncing things, HOT steel is only one of many things in my shop that can and do get me. You just get used to a certain level of wounding, avoiding the BAD ones is possible but not the little nicks and dings.

 

Was it the boyfriend's shout that warned you, did it come in the Nick of time?

 

Sorry, couldn't resist, I LOVE a straight line and his is going to be around for a while. I'll just apologize now, it's the tree's fault you know, I used to have some sense of propriety.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that a piece of it hitting you is clear evidence that you didn't have some since of property!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My goodness Thomas, how could I have forgotten THAT cat reflex!?

 

(FYI) Ninja rolls only work if there isn't anything HOT, sharp or pointy on the floor. I prefer a right smart jig for getting out of the way of falling, flying, bouncing things, HOT steel is only one of many things in my shop that can and do get me. You just get used to a certain level of wounding, avoiding the BAD ones is possible but not the little nicks and dings.

 

Was it the boyfriend's shout that warned you, did it come in the Nick of time?

 

Sorry, couldn't resist, I LOVE a straight line and his is going to be around for a while. I'll just apologize now, it's the tree's fault you know, I used to have some sense of propriety.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

I work outside so the ground is clear of sharp, pointy, hot things.  Also makes it easier to catch bugs and chase leaves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that a piece of it hitting you is clear evidence that you didn't have some since of property!

 

Oh you Wood take that cut. And the whole darned thing hit me less the bit in the ground, not just a piece.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't try to carry on a conversation at a critical time when forging.

 

I spent quite a bit of time making my first gooseneck tongs.  They (the two halves) turned out great.  Friend came over and started a conversation about the time I was ready to rivet them together.  Decided to hot rivet, slipped the rivet in the holes, set the tongs in the fire, stood there talking while waiting to bring them up to bright red, OOOOOPS!!!!  Quickly pulled the tongs out, had two reins and one jaw.  The other jaw was burnt off.  Bad words...bad words...bad words.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I work outside so the ground is clear of sharp, pointy, hot things.  Also makes it easier to catch bugs and chase leaves.

 

Sounds purrrfect.

 

You are sooooo going to fit in here Darlin.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.