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don schad

Evaluating a Beaudry-Champion #4 (100#)

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Hi all,

 

I am going to look at a non-running 100# Beaudry-Champion - #4 hammer in the near future.  I don't know too much at this point, except that the owner hasn't run it either and the sow block is not in good shape/was repaired in some dubious manner.  

 

I was wondering if anyone could suggest specific problem areas or things to look for when I inspect it?  Anything specific to check or look out for?  Areas of wear to be concerned about?   How about parts/rebuilding such a machine - I assume there isn't anything available, but can things be reasonably forged/fab/machined? 

 

Finally, what would be the value of a well running #4?   Based on their reputation I would think better then a similar sized LG? 

 

Any thoughts or experience welcome.

 

Thanks,

 

Don

 

 

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For wear, check out any place two or more parts move.  Try to twist one against another, see if there is play.  Also, make sure the hammer is complete.  No holes with nothing attached.  Look for any cracking on the frame.  Check the main shaft for play.  Be sure the steel has not worn through the bearings.  As with any old machine, do you have the skills to make parts or have access to someone who could?  And do you have a way to move the hammer, a place to put it, and a way to power it?

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I'm sure other Beaudry heads will chime in.

 

Bring a LED flashlight look inside the ram and check if the rollers have frozen and worn groves on the interior of the ram.

Check the frame around the anvil hole for cracks.

Check the frame ram guides for scoring/ impact damage from the die key.

Check the frame between the ram guides for cracks from running the guides loose.

 

I'd say $1000 for a hammer that needs machine work on the sow block (new dies?) motor, magnetic starter, slip belting, jack shaft and stand. A clutch model might increase it's value, a busted sow block would decrease it. I'd say the value of a 100lb Beaudry, LG, Bradley with all the work done by your average person is the about the same, around $4000.

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I own a #4 Beaudry and pretty much agree with what Andrew posted.  Mine had a non-working motor when I got it and the ram was cracked across the middle of the oval window that allows you to see the rollers.  The rollers were flat spotted and frozen so I had two new ones made and a new bronze bushing for the crank.  I cut a piece of 1/4 plate steel and welded it to the front of the ram to contain the crack.

 

I built a motor mount and jackshaft pulley arrangement, bought a new 3 hp motor and also had new upper and lower flat dies made from H13 tool steel (4W x 7L x 2H).

 

I did all of this rebuilding over 25 years ago and IIRC, I had about $1600 in it when finished (of course, that was in late 1980's dollars).  I then purchased a copy of Clifton Ralph's videos and built most of his tooling.  If I was interested in selling (and I'm not) I would ask at least $5K as it sits since the hammer needs nothing at this point.

 

IMHO, Beaudry's are a bit more versatile than LG's with length of stroke but not as heavily built as Bradleys.

 

Good luck and feel free to PM me if you have any questions.

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Hi all,

 

Thanks for your replies, this is helpful information.  I will be sure to closely examine the arms and rollers, among the other items suggested.

 

I have a 50# LG which I am happy with, and I have been thinking of getting a larger machine to augment it, but I haven't really been looking.  Then out of the blue I got a call from some one wondering if I were interested in this hammer, so I figure it can't hurt to look. 

 

I also came across a thread in the forums about motor mounting for this type of hammer.  I'm not sure what set up this hammer has, although he did say it would require a motor also, so that might be useful also.

 

Again, thanks - your comments are appreciated.

 

Don

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