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mc leod usfs homemade

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hello guys sorry to disturb you, I do not know if this topic is relevant to this area of ​​the forum, however, expose: For personal reasons I should build a hand tool that they use the fire department to clean the areas sogette to fires is a hoe rake I need for my wasteland as they could burst fire could you help me to realize that tools and materials method you advise me to use materials that can be recycled to the blade if I use sheet steel joint venture to use it a little time to dent it and make it unusable I would do a lightweight and sturdy manegevole at the same time, thanks to the next aspect of suggestions I invite you to respond

 

 

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the steel handle will be much more tiring to hold than a wooden one and can also have problems overheating. So you need some sort of cover that will make it easier on the hands and not transmit shock to them.

 

I would suggest a more positive connection than screw threads as they may loosen up when heated.

 

As for materials for the head I would try to find old thin disks from a disking plow, (google plow disk and look at the images), cut the shape from it and then forge flat and normalize

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A regular garden rake, with peice of spring welded to the back is servicible for home use. For somthing stout i would agree with TP, you should be able to build 3 or 4 from a 22" cultivator disk.
A stout wooden handle is a must

That tool is used in conjuntion with a polaskie (axe with a hoe blade on the back) and a sharp round point shovel. Used to fight fire of the USFS.
If you plan on using proscibed burns for fuel management, build a slaper from am old mud flap.

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google Rogue Hoe

they make alot of rugged tools many of them for forest fire work and other land clearing tools that are made from old Disc Harrow Blades

nice rugged tools and a good place to look for ideas as to tools to make

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As a fire fighter I can say that the McLeod is a great and versatile tool that is often overlooked. I never really thought about making one though. I would think that a metal handle would be ok for limited use but with the added weight and shock it would wear on you. An old plow disc with the teeth cut in one side and the other cut flat and a pipe big enough to take a shovel handle welded strongly to the center would work great if I had to come up with one in a pinch and had my heart set on a McLeod.

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Ed Pulaski was the famous hero of the 1910 fires in northern Idaho! His leadership and heroic efforts mostly saved the town of Wallace and 55 men who were with him when they were overrun by the fires. He led the men to a mine tunnel and held them in at gunpoint, despite their panic! Most of the men (55) survived! Ed was badly injured as he lay at the tunnel entrance to prevent the panicked men from racing into the fire! During his convalescence in the following year he invented the Pulaski tool which yet carries his name. He suffered lifelong disabilities as a result of the tunnel incident but received almost no compensation from the forest service! He did produce and sell some of the tools but never claimed a patent on it and was never paid for his design! He was a true American HERO!

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The book, "The Great Burn" tells the story in detail, it will take your respect those that fight froest fires to a new level.

 

Ed Pulaski was the famous hero of the 1910 fires in northern Idaho! His leadership and heroic efforts mostly saved the town of Wallace and 55 men who were with him when they were overrun by the fires. He led the men to a mine tunnel and held them in at gunpoint, despite their panic! Most of the men (55) survived! Ed was badly injured as he lay at the tunnel entrance to prevent the panicked men from racing into the fire! During his convalescence in the following year he invented the Pulaski tool which yet carries his name. He suffered lifelong disabilities as a result of the tunnel incident but received almost no compensation from the forest service! He did produce and sell some of the tools but never claimed a patent on it and was never paid for his design! He was a true American HERO!

 

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The Pulaski is still one of my favorite tools to use on the fire line. A rino is a easy tool to construct. It is made from a modified shovel with the tip of the spade cut flat and the neck bent over to make a wide hoe with a long handle it's a favorite of many.

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thanks for the valuable advice I will treasure it, doubt it was just the choice of material for the steely blade to prevent denting and wear thanks again55HXHssm.jpgp3pb3492741.jpg

 

 

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I'm a big fan of Rogue tools.  I carry one as my fireline tool.

 

One thing to think about with wildland fire tools is the fuel type and terrain.  A McLeod will work well in grassier fuels or after something heavier has cleared the thicker stuff.  A Pulaski can grub out deeper roots and cut thicker brush.  Etc.

 

Also, for wildland firefighting in Europe look up a guy named Mausi in Germany. He and a few others have a hand crew that fights fire in Spain (I think) every summer.  His full name is Detlef.

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