Chancellor

Stupendous documentary

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Here's a documentary from 1965 of an old Axe shop. I'm amazed at the economy of their actions. There isn't a single misstep, nor is there any wasted motion.

 


 

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It's been discussed some here:

 

But yes, it is a great video.  Bittersweet, but well worth watching.

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Nice - times gone by. Obviously pre-OSHA and the vilification of smoking - light your pipe with a red hot axe head blank, manly indeed.

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seen it before a few time s but loved to watch it again, what a great piece of filming...

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Since we're talking about documentaries, here's one from the old world.  I really enjoyed the welding and fitting first-hand.  While I'm sure there are smiths today that can do it, there's something special about watching the pro's that did it for a living.  I loved how they build the fire to heat the tires and fitted them to the wagon's wheel.

 

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Was interesting to see the brick making in that video too.  There's a place about an hours drive north of London  that still makes bricks that way, mainly special orders for building restoration jobs.  It's good to see old crafts being preserved in these days of mass production, especially in industrialised countries.

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Was interesting to see the brick making in that video too.  There's a place about an hours drive north of London  that still makes bricks that way, mainly special orders for building restoration jobs.  It's good to see old crafts being preserved in these days of mass production, especially in industrialised countries.

 

Do you know how the contraption that is grinding the mud for the bricks works, do you?

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Chancellor I LOVE that video. I find that technique interesting, where they overlay the carbon instead of insertion for the edge. What a great vid. I've thought of trying that style of carbon steel tip... maybe one day ;) 

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Do you know how the contraption that is grinding the mud for the bricks works, do you?

 

Uhm, we have two of the modern equivalents at the foundry where I work, not sure of their specific name, we just call them "mills", They're basically two heavy steel rollers in a steel drum that rotate breaking up and combining sand and clay for green sand casting.  Apparently they help coat the sand grains with clay to help create a stronger mix.

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Chancellor I LOVE that video. I find that technique interesting, where they overlay the carbon instead of insertion for the edge. What a great vid. I've thought of trying that style of carbon steel tip... maybe one day ;)

 

Yeah, I noticed that too. I wonder what the (dis)advantages of each are.

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Is that machine a "Muller"

And if you are resteeling an axe it's much simpler to fold the HC and envelop the old edge than to split it and insert. If you are working from the start and doing a fold and forge weld axebody then inserting the HC bit is easy and can use a smaller HC piece.

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Finally got a chance to sit still for a few moments and watch that video last night. I love watching people work together who have obviously spent a GREAT deal of time getting to know each others movements, anticipating their next move, they really do become a well oiled machine that is fun to watch.  Crying shame the place went out of business.  Thanks for the post

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