chandlerdickinson

Making Some Blacksmith Juice or Goop Protective Coating For Finishing Forged Items

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Thanks to the help from some of you here and other elsewhere I made up some "Blacksmith Juice/Goop" for a finishing coating on my forged items. I like it alot and it is a good coating having left some coated items outside in the rain for a few days I can see that it protects well. Here's how I made it.

 

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If you warm your knife it should it the bees wax easier.

 

I have heard of using Mineral Turpentine rather than acetone. I wonder what the difference is? They would both thin the mix & evaporate out to help dry I guess.

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Turpentine is the traditional one to use in this mixture. Not sure I'd want to expose acetone to heat like that - its far nastier stuff.

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I agree, don't use acetone.  In addition to flammability issues it's nasty to get in your lungs and on your skin.  Will also evaporate out of the mix rapidly.  Turpentine is better.

 

A tip for dealing with a block of beeswax is to freeze it overnight and then hammer on the anvil to crumble, easier then trying to cut up with a knife.  You can also use a cheese grater.  

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The last batch I made was with equal parts beeswax, boiled linseed oil and turpentine. It's a pretty good coating but it is too far from being a liquid when cold. Next time I will use proportionately less beeswax, probably half as much as the other ingredients. I have also used just boiled linseed oil by itself and got a good coating from that. Lots of ways to skin this cat.

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I've used equal portions of beeswax and boiled linseed oil as a protectant. I have also used black shoe polish. It is just a wax also.

Ohio Rusty ><>

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I use beeswax and wd-40 with very good results. I obtained a large container of WD-40 for next to nothing so it's my go to juice.

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We always used a double boiler to melt beeswax. When you make a liquid out of it you can measure it the same way you measure the linseed oil, and the turps. No guessing involved.

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On 3/16/2015 at 1:30 PM, Ohio Rusty said:

I've used equal portions of beeswax and boiled linseed oil as a protectant. I have also used black shoe polish. It is just a wax also.

Ohio Rusty ><>

Hey Rusty....are you using straight black shoe polish or adding it to the Beeswax/Linseed/Turp concoction? I have tried the Beeswax/Linseed/Turp in the past and wasnt dark enough for me but you may be onto something if i can tint the Beeswax/Linseed/Turp quite a bit darker.

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On 3/16/2015 at 1:30 PM, Ohio Rusty said:

I've used equal portions of beeswax and boiled linseed oil as a protectant. I have also used black shoe polish. It is just a wax also.

Ohio Rusty ><>

 

Hey Rusty....are you using straight black shoe polish or adding it to the Beeswax/Linseed/Turp concoction? I have tried the Beeswax/Linseed/Turp in the past and wasnt dark enough for me but you may be onto something if i can tint the Beeswax/Linseed/Turp quite a bit darker.

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Quick question, I've read beewax could be somewhat acidic and some suggest Microcrystalline wax was instead.

What about soy wax?

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