chandlerdickinson

Making Some Blacksmith Juice or Goop Protective Coating For Finishing Forged Items

Recommended Posts

Thanks to the help from some of you here and other elsewhere I made up some "Blacksmith Juice/Goop" for a finishing coating on my forged items. I like it alot and it is a good coating having left some coated items outside in the rain for a few days I can see that it protects well. Here's how I made it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you warm your knife it should it the bees wax easier.

 

I have heard of using Mineral Turpentine rather than acetone. I wonder what the difference is? They would both thin the mix & evaporate out to help dry I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Turpentine is the traditional one to use in this mixture. Not sure I'd want to expose acetone to heat like that - its far nastier stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, don't use acetone.  In addition to flammability issues it's nasty to get in your lungs and on your skin.  Will also evaporate out of the mix rapidly.  Turpentine is better.

 

A tip for dealing with a block of beeswax is to freeze it overnight and then hammer on the anvil to crumble, easier then trying to cut up with a knife.  You can also use a cheese grater.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last batch I made was with equal parts beeswax, boiled linseed oil and turpentine. It's a pretty good coating but it is too far from being a liquid when cold. Next time I will use proportionately less beeswax, probably half as much as the other ingredients. I have also used just boiled linseed oil by itself and got a good coating from that. Lots of ways to skin this cat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used equal portions of beeswax and boiled linseed oil as a protectant. I have also used black shoe polish. It is just a wax also.

Ohio Rusty ><>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use beeswax and wd-40 with very good results. I obtained a large container of WD-40 for next to nothing so it's my go to juice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We always used a double boiler to melt beeswax. When you make a liquid out of it you can measure it the same way you measure the linseed oil, and the turps. No guessing involved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/16/2015 at 3:30 PM, Ohio Rusty said:

I've used equal portions of beeswax and boiled linseed oil as a protectant. I have also used black shoe polish. It is just a wax also.

Hey Rusty....are you using straight black shoe polish or adding it to the Beeswax/Linseed/Turp concoction? I have tried the Beeswax/Linseed/Turp in the past and wasnt dark enough for me but you may be onto something if i can tint the Beeswax/Linseed/Turp quite a bit darker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was "surfing" YouTube videos last night and came across one where a fellow was cleaning and restoring an old anvil.  He used a mixture of Bees Wax, Boiled Linseed Oil and Turpentine in equal parts to coat the anvil after all of his paint stripping, etc.  (I think that was the recepe, but it was late and I didn't write it down)  Is anyone familiar with this?  I'm wondering if it would be a good protection for all metal in my shop.  I wiped all my hammer heads down with Boiled Linseed Oil after I cleaned them up and dressed them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty common blacksmith's "goo" to apply to metalwork.  Warming the metal first helps get it in all the cracks and crevices, applied with an acid brush and rubbed down after it cools.  Really depends on your environments and wants. I tend to not change the "patina" on my blacksmithing tools; just use them and that's not only here in the desert but also when I lived in Central Ohio which is much damper and condensation prone.   

I tend more to a "working shop" look vs a "show shop"; but one is not necessarily better than another. (I had a friend who used to bug me about my shop being messier than his; I once told him that he spent more hours a week tidying his shop than I got to spend in mine; so I was perfectly happy spending my time pounding rather than sweeping!)

BLO works well straight; I soak my hammers head down in a baking tray of it to prevent the shrinkage of the handles and then rub them down with the proverbably "oily rag" when I take them out---usually a week later.  (and then I burn the rag!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ratio I use is: 1part beeswax to 1/2 part boiled linseed oil and 1/2 part turpentine.

Get a junk pot you won't be cooking food with and preferably on an electric stove (to lessen the fire risk) shave the beeswax into the pot and melt. Then add in your half parts blo and turps and stir it all together. Then get a cookie tin (preferably one that won't leak) or lidded container with large opening, and pour it in and let it cool. 

As Thomas mentioned, its better applied to a warm surface.

Soaks into warm wood as well. I've used it on hammer handles. Tho I prefer to sand with around 320 grit after since the excess on the outside of the handle may pollish with use and seems to lead to fatigue in use. 

Forgot to mention that depending on use and conditions this will need reapplied on occassion. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Das recipe makes a paste, but maybe not. The more beeswax added makes it a paste. I like mine a liquid so use 50/50 boiled linseed oil and turps. and beeswax to suit. I do not think the proportions are critical, but are a matter of taste.

My standard is a quart each of BLO and turps. I put this on my fire in a gallon paint can. Make sure you have the lid. To this i add ~ a walnut/egg size of beeswax. Use a very low heat 'til the wax melts. Put back into the two quart cans with lids.  It will store for a long time.

Should it flash in the paint can, I take it off the fire with my rake and put the lid on, so make sure you have the lid to the paint can. 

I apply this at a black heat. If it smokes off, its too hot. If it is "wet", too cold. It takes a bit of practice to hit the correct temp.  It should smoke off and give you a nice "dry" matte black finish.

For a cold finish, meaning cold iron, substitute beeswax with japan dryer and do not heat. I store this in a mason jar with a gasket. When i apply it, I make sure to close the jar whilst wiping on the finish. Be very aware that the japan dryer evaporates quickly and you may have to add more over time.  It is very quick drying. If i do say a 10' handrail, by the time i get to the end it is dry enough to apply a second coat. I usually do 4-5 coats cold. 

And, like Thomas, i have a working shop. My hand made tools get an oil finish when i make them, and thats it.  And putting a hot oil finish on my work across my anvil is about it for "preserving" my tools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're correct Anvil, the mix I make makes a softer paste. If not stored with a lid/ or sealing lid, it eventually hardens up a bit but can be remelted to add a bit more BLO/turps. Its ok if it hardens a bit too since I can just hold the warm piece to it and it'll melt enough to get on the piece and I just use a cottony rag to wipe it. 

I'm curious to try your mixes out when I get a little free time. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Japan drier was mentioned as an additive for the iron coating mixtures.

Japan drier covers a number of sicatives. (i.e. driers). Some of the drying salts are made from metallic salts. Some of those salts are toxic such as cobalt, zinc, zirconium etc.

Preliminary research should be done where the coating mixture is to be used for iron implements that are used for preparing or serving food, 

Check to see that the siccatives are food grade/safe.

Just Sayyin'

SLAG.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For items that come in contact with food I prefer to use a light coat of walnut oil (if for sale, I'd add a nut allergy warning to be safe) and let it dry. In daily/weekly use I personally use a light coat of olive oil then wipe dry"ish".  beeswax (also a potential allergen tho and I always use pharmaceutical/cosmetic grade. And honestly just feel better using it)  or "gulf wax" (paraffin wax for canning) can also be applied while warm. Food grade mineral oil can be used also. 

Just some that I do or would use. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Morning,

Floor Wax, paste, is easy to procure and easy to keep. If you spill any on the floor............ 

Makes a good semi-gloss finish on ironwork. Easy to touch up. Dip the warm parts in the Wax container and wax goes into all the corners. When it cools down, it is a paste again.

Neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm too lazy to make my own so I use Ballistol. The Germans came up with it to protect firearms during WWI if I recall right. The only drawback is it is smelly till it dries so my wife won't let me use it in the house.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Trewax, Carnuba paste wax. Applied to fresh cup of coffee/tea hot work it liquefies and is very penetrating. Wipe off excess and it's very hard when it cools. 

Another good one is LPS 3 aerosol spray. It contains rust converters and preventatives and leaves a coat of hard wax when the volatiles evaporate off. It IS expensive  though.

I keep a piece of bees wax on hand for folk who want bees wax finish. 

Doffers and other things spinners use on or around wool get finished with raw wool, the heavy lanolin in raw wool makes a good finish and won't stain wool or other fibers.

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.