Benton Frisse

Viking Blacksmith Grave

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Hey folks, I saw this article published today by the Irish Archaeology website and thought it would be cool to share. 

 

http://irisharchaeology.ie/2014/09/viking-blacksmiths-grave-uncovered-in-norway/

 

Pretty cool stuff in the image, I see some tongs and what looks like fullers! And maybe some certain types of hammers! 

I hope this isn't the wrong place to put this, but I thought you all would enjoy this article as much as I did. 

 

Cheers! 

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Look he was using "japanese hammers!" (just a joke...)

Seemed a bit odd that the hammers were handle up in the grave I would have thought they would be laid down. (unless they were placed without handles.)

I wish my garden was that "nice"

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Thomas, I wonder if he hammered with this thumb on top of the hammer handle or to the side? lol 

 

Good question, might have been what killed him and why they planted the hammers with him. Eh?

 

I see your Viking grave and raise you a Viking ring fort.

www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/denmark/11079056/Viking-ring-fortress-discovered-in-Denmark.html

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I think it is a bit odd they would bury a blacksmiths tools WITH the bent sword. Vikings would commonly destroy the sword of their defeated enemies so they could not use them in the afterlife. Burying a blacksmith with the bent sword and ALL the tools he would need to fix it in the afterlife....

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Stealing swords out of graves was not unknown in Viking times; perhaps ritually "killing" them helped to discourage it.

Note if you click on the "source" you get a much better picture and access to a short video on it!

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sooo, if that's the grave, and those are the tools, where is the smith? O.o  pretty amazing that such a thing could be buried what appears to be less than 6" down in a developed area too!

 

thanks for the interesting read Benton!

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They send Viking warriors off in a burning ship. Does that mean they burn down the smithy for the blacksmith? :P

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Facebook is good for something every now and then it pointed me in the direction of the following page. Picture shows;

a sword (bent), anvil, two hammer heads, and the prize (to me at least) an axe head with some awesome langits.

 

Link> http://irisharchaeology.ie/2014/09/viking-blacksmiths-grave-uncovered-in-norway/

 

Discuss and Enjoy!

 

 

 

Merging this into the existing thread on this

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Facebook is good for something every now and then it pointed me in the direction of the following page. Picture shows;
a sword (bent), anvil, two hammer heads, and the prize (to me at least) an axe head with some awesome langits.
 
Link> http://irisharchaeology.ie/2014/09/viking-blacksmiths-grave-uncovered-in-norway/
 
Discuss and Enjoy!

Very cool.
What is a langit? I searched the term and found nothing.

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Did they find a skeleton? Why was the sword bent like that, was it part of the cause of his death, or something symbolic they did in those days? Is this a single grave or do you think more would be in the area? (I don't know if they just got buried where they fell or if they had cemeteries back then.)
Cool stuff though, lots to ponder....

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it's a symbolic thing, i don't remember the exact tale but if you didn't destroy your enemies weapon then that could somehow come back at you and do you some harm, i think they said something about this in the Secrets of the Viking sword

maybe Ric here has a better answer to this

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Very cool indeed.

 

For me its a nice connection with blacksmithing and the past. The tongs for example look remarkably similar in design to those still being made and used today. It makes me wonder just how long the design has actually been around, and also makes me want to make a pair : ) .

 

I wonder if a smith at that time would have had racks full of tongs, one for each different task, or a few pair that he made do with? my guess is the latter.

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Maybe he was 'put' there by the chap that bought the 'sword that bent' in the Viking 'expressing your displeasure/unhappy customer tradition'  :)

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Very cool.
What is a langit? I searched the term and found nothing.

 

its a typo, to be exact ;)

 

Langet's are the little pointed 'ears' on the sides of the axe eye that basically point up and down the handle.  also defined as a strap of sorts springing from the same location to fix a larger head like a halberd to the pole with rivets.

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its a typo, to be exact ;)

 

Langet's are the little pointed 'ears' on the sides of the axe eye that basically point up and down the handle.  also defined as a strap of sorts springing from the same location to fix a larger head like a halberd to the pole with rivets.

thanks, learn something new every day...

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Maybe he was 'put' there by the chap that bought the 'sword that bent' in the Viking 'expressing your displeasure/unhappy customer tradition'   :)

i somehow doubt it, according to what i've heard and the sagas, their swords bent really easily and a good example of that is from Laxdæla, where Kjartan was slain because he was straightening his sword by standing on it, there are two versions of this story though, the other is that he refused to fight his adopted brother Bolli, but Bolli wasn't on the same page and yea, ran him through with his sword

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A well-stocked grave of a blacksmith from the Viking Age is one of the best finds in Norway last year, according to Norwegian archeologists.

 

At the top they found the blacksmith tools. The archaeologists also found an axe and sword and some agricultural implements. Deeper down were the blacksmith’s personal items, including a razor, a scissors for trimming his beard, tweezers, a frying pan and a poker. The grave contained about 60 artefacts.

Read more

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