Ser Menalak

Coal forge sheet metal base plate brake drum forge

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Hello all,

 

I have been using a brake drum forge I made much like the ones seen on the internet. It works and can reach the temperatures I need, so much so I ended up burning off some hard work I put into some rebar :( Part of learning I guess! My problem is this, to keep coal from falling down my tuyere I believe it's called, I got some sheet metal I found at the Brimfield Faire. It was like this really thin tinny looking sheet used for decorating restaurants, sort of like corrugated steel. Anyways, I cut a circle of it and put it in the bottom of the forge and drilled holes into the center. It worked for a little while but now I have air coming up out and around the plate rather than just through the holes. I think it's because it has warped so much from the heat it was never meant to experience. I couldn't get a clear picture since its filled with coal. I am now burning basically an entire brake drum of coal constantly, I don't really have a center of heat, its all going. This is really wasteful I feel. I was wondering if you guys knew of any good material or piece to put in the bottom of a brake drum forge (or any forge) that will work much better? I do have some old BBQ grill....grill. The bars seem too far apart though. Whatever you guys could recommend would be great, thanks!  

 

EDIT: I was perusing more, I have no way of actually welding something, I don't mean forge welding. So it would be next to impossible for me to weld some bars into the pipe.

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Greetings Ser,

 

Sounds like you are havin fun...  This topic was just covered on Aug 4... Look up steel plate and it should answer all your questions...  Not a big deal and an a easy fix...   Problems after your read the thread chime in and you will get more answers....  I wish you well

 

Forge on and make beautiful things

 

Jim

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Greetings Ser,

 

Sounds like you are havin fun...  This topic was just covered on Aug 4... Look up steel plate and it should answer all your questions...  Not a big deal and an a easy fix...   Problems after your read the thread chime in and you will get more answers....  I wish you well

 

Forge on and make beautiful things

 

Jim

 

Hi there,

 

Thanks for the reply. Ya I actually did read that post before posting this but here was my dilemma: You said there was a good base you can get on ebay for 16 dollars but I didn't know if it was the 1/4 plate you talk of later or something different. Could you clarify this?  The other suggestion seemed to be what I currently have but it doesn't seem to be working out too well for me. It could just be too thin material or too poorly cut. I wouldn't have any way to cut 1/4 inch steel either, in order to cut the sheet metal I used garden shears :P

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Greetings again,

 

You can also buy the plate I suggested from Centuar Forge..  They are cast and work well..  I have several that have been in service for years..   If you can not form 1/4 plate it would be best to buy one...   Good luck

 

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim

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gallery_1_534_2504.jpg

 

You want to restrict the air produced but not restrict the air going to the fuel. Keep the air tube open and just enough grate to hold the fuel in the forge. For the 55 Forge I use a 2 or 2-1/4 inch auto exhaust pipe and one or two pieces of 1/4 in mild steel rods as a great. This leaves a LOT of room for air to pass into the fire.

 

The BP0133 on the 55 forge shoes more detail.

2F26-P1010118.jpg

 

Drill 2 each 1/4" holes in the air tube just below the flange. Insert one of the pieces of 1/4" round stock and mark where you think the other piece of round stock could pass under it. Drill two more 1/4" holes as to not interfeer with the round stock.

Insert the first piece of round stock and flatten the "other" end. Repeat for the second piece of round stock.

 

Your a blacksmith, make the grate. Bend say 1/4 inch round stock to look like the symbol for pi. Make the 2 legs the width of the opening, and top wide enough to catch on top of the opening and not fall into the hole. If you make two of the units you can cross them and put a dimple in them so they stay crossed. You may want to try wiring them together with some tie wire or something if need be.

 

The local plumbing store may have a cast iron drain cover that could be put into service. Go look at their inventory.

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As a stop gap measure you can jam a wad of chicken wire in the air tube .   That might keep you forging until the real solution can be  fabricated and installed.

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You can get slotted cast iron drain grates at McMaster-Carr.  I have been using the slotted ones in my drum forge.  Since most of your air will be coming straight up through the pipe (least resistance), ash and coke will accumulate around the periphery of the inside of the fire in the drum and seal off any significant air around it.  Get the thickest and largest diameter you can.

 

http://www.mcmaster.com/#drain-grating/=t6cz2z

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gallery_1_534_2504.jpg

 

You want to restrict the air produced but not restrict the air going to the fuel. Keep the air tube open and just enough grate to hold the fuel in the forge. For the 55 Forge I use a 2 or 2-1/4 inch auto exhaust pipe and one or two pieces of 1/4 in mild steel rods as a great. This leaves a LOT of room for air to pass into the fire.

 

The BP0133 on the 55 forge shoes more detail.

2F26-P1010118.jpg

 

Drill 2 each 1/4" holes in the air tube just below the flange. Insert one of the pieces of 1/4" round stock and mark where you think the other piece of round stock could pass under it. Drill two more 1/4" holes as to not interfeer with the round stock.

Insert the first piece of round stock and flatten the "other" end. Repeat for the second piece of round stock.

 

Your a blacksmith, make the grate. Bend say 1/4 inch round stock to look like the symbol for pi. Make the 2 legs the width of the opening, and top wide enough to catch on top of the opening and not fall into the hole. If you make two of the units you can cross them and put a dimple in them so they stay crossed. You may want to try wiring them together with some tie wire or something if need be.

 

The local plumbing store may have a cast iron drain cover that could be put into service. Go look at their inventory.

 

 

As a stop gap measure you can jam a wad of chicken wire in the air tube .   That might keep you forging until the real solution can be  fabricated and installed.

Thank you all for this great help. I will hopefully try and implement some of this stuff soon!

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