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I doubt his dogs are flee bitten but yeah, enough money and fame and a person feels they can do anything. There's nothing like a little egg on a bureaucrat's face to make them tighten the screws on anyone actually obeying the rules. It's like the old joke about why Post office personnel only shooting supervisors. They can't hit a moving target.

How much KY jelly did it take to get that tractor in the container? Oh, that's it, the dunnage (wood blocks) are endangered tropical hardwoods!

Frosty The Lucky.

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How much KY jelly did it take to get that tractor in the container? Oh, that's it, the dunnage (wood blocks) are endangered tropical hardwoods!

Frosty The Lucky.

​The tractor has about 12mm on each side. Not much room for error!

Incidentally, we made sure that the wood pallets and blocks were stamped certified treated timber before they left the U.S. I don't think they had a problem with that.

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My son's job includes picking up horses coming into the US by air in NY from the quarantine stables.  He has found carrying a few Pints  of Maple Syrup in his truck "Sweetens" the folks he deals with there.  From the paperwork guy to the horse handler they give him top service with a smile.  He does the same when he takes horses down to be loaded for flight to Germany he leaves a pint for each flight crew member and handlers.  They figure they have lots of $$ in the horses a few bucks in syrup is worth every penny.  Plus they make the syrup themselves. 

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Incidentally, we made sure that the wood pallets and blocks were stamped certified treated timber before they left the U.S. I don't think they had a problem with that.

​We've had this where I work, we send stuff to Australia once or twice a year and we have to buy specially made wooden pallets made with certified wood otherwise the whole shipment will be rejected by Australian customs.  It seems a little odd to us that a country where just about everything that walks, slithers or crawls carries deadly venom or giant teeth is worried about a bit of dirt!

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A freind of mine, untile his last promoton ran the wearhouse and shiping departments of a computer hardware supplyer in Perth. After rabits, cats, rats, dogs and other ailien species have devistated some indigines species they are a bit touchy. I imagine He will have some good stories when I see him In October.

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Foundryman, you may be right about our venomous nasties here, but I think the Customs guys are more worried about what you can't see. There has been a recent scare about Panama disease which has been found recently on one of our North Qld banana plantations. It's a fungal condition that has devastated the industry in other countries, so our quarantine people are a bit paranoid right now. As a Bananabender (Queenslander) myself, I can sort of understand that, but I doubt any banana disease would be coming in on immaculate tractors from Ohio. As far as I know, Ohio is not well known for its tropical fruit.

Still, I'm not complaining ... just frustrated at the extra time in getting this shipment home.

And yes, Charles, introduced species here have been a big problem. The  clown who introduced cane toads should have been hung, drawn and quartered. They were an environmental disaster.:angry:

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In the pet traid they are called "pac-man frogs" they will quite literaly eat anytthing they can fit in their pez dispenser like heads. To include rocks, golf balls etc. 

problem is you cant convince aussies to eat the dang things ;-) we white folk have a pretty good track record of hunting speicies to extinction,

the damage has already been done in the US, invasive soeicies and plants are everywhere. Goats are used in the southwest to control multiflora rose, herbisides in the deap south to control kudsu ( and despite its nutrisinal value Americans wont eat the stuff either ;-) and we have the starling (of blackbird pie fame) imported to replace the carrier podgen as a food animal. Not to mention the verius spicies of rat.  Florida has iguana, python, boa and anaconda, oh my.  Wild and ferral hogs... The list goes on. 

 

 

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Nice looking tractor, are you going to 'put on a turbo, paint it Fiat/International orange, chrome the rims  and race it?':D  The customs blokes may seem a bit 'OTT.' at times I think the error of others ways have taught them a lot.

I wish the same could be said for the 'lot' guarding(and I mean that loosely) the American airports. That uniform needs a red cravat to add ' the turkey ' look to ' the turkey ' vibe.

Edited by ianinsa
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OK Dave,

Here's a pic of our latest three tractors. All JDs - AOS, GPWT and GP Beaner. I can assume from your avatar that you are an admirer of the green machines.

 

DSC_4269.jpg

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I am trying to post pics of this anvil but keep getting "403 Forbidden" message. Will keep trying.

Edited by ausfire
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My grandfather had the first Case dealership in AR.  It was awarded to him at the State Fair near Little Rock along with his first tractor and he drove it from Little Rock to Fort Smith way before the interstate days. He could have put it on the train but he was a savvy business man---every farmer working in his fields seeing that "odd colored" tractor puttering down the road had to come look it over and talk with my Grandfather.  He had sold a bunch of them by the time he got it home....

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My grandfather had the first Case dealership in AR.  It was awarded to him at the State Fair near Little Rock along with his first tractor and he drove it from Little Rock to Fort Smith way before the interstate days. He could have put it on the train but he was a savvy business man---every farmer working in his fields seeing that "odd colored" tractor puttering down the road had to come look it over and talk with my Grandfather.  He had sold a bunch of them by the time he got it home....

Awesome story and thanks for sharing. I know an older gent near Jasper Ar that bought a brand spankin new 830 John Deere (a big old 2 cylinder diesel) in Pratt Ks and drove it home to Arkansas. He still has it today and in quite good condition.

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Still no good. Won't let me post a pic.

[Forbidden - you do not have access to topic 'a journey for this anvil']

So I'll open a new topic. A journey 2

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OK we'll see how we go with a new topic.

The long awaited Hay Budden anvil now rests on a stump in my smithy. Not secured yet, but that's the next job.

It was pretty grubby when it arrived and I don't know how it didn't get more attention than the pristine tractors. There was more muck in the hardy hole than on any of the tractors.

Gave it a clean with some degreaser (I think it had a previous life in a service garage or something) and a scrub with a wire brush. It was once painted yellow.

A good scrub revealed the Hay Budden Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn, NY logo and a number on the base below the horn. Very difficult to read, even with the flour treatment. It starts with an A and I'm guessing at A17693. I would really like to know its year of manufacture, and from what I've read, it's possibly about 1920?? It has a clear 5 stamped under the horn.

It has a reasonably good (about 80%) bounce with a 35mm ball bearing and has quite a loud ring, which I shall attempt to deaden. The face is flat and the table and horn seem perfectly fine. Someone has been a little careless with a cutting torch and there are a couple of small blemishes. The guy I bought it from says they could be repaired with a #9018 stick, but I don't think I will bother. They are small and are cosmetic only, having no effect on the use. It's had a few chisels and punches 'tested' on the base too, but that's OK.

I'm happy with it and look forward to using it. I'm glad too, that I bought it last year when the Aus $ was doing better against the US $. Only buying about 74 cents at present. I'll add a couple of photos. Any help with the number/date would be welcome.

Now. let's see if we can post a pic:

 

 

HB on stump.jpg

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Beautiful anvil, Ausfire.  To think that an anvil made in Brooklyn, New York almost a hundred years ago is now on the other side of the world..... that's a lot of travel for it's short life!

 

Best way to deaden the ring is to tilt it up and squeeze about half a tube of silicone caulk on the base.  When that silicone hardens, it'll sound like you're pounding on an oak plank!  Not quite as good as a Fisher's "thunk", but definitely better than the ear-splitting bell that it is right now.  Just have a few nails at the ready to pin it in place because that silicone makes it want to slip and slide like you wouldn't believe!

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Thanks Vaughn - yes, I'll get some silicone caulk on the job. I have taken note of all the advice offered in these forums about tying down anvils and I've come up with a method I think will work for me. Tomorrow I will post a pic of this anvil secured in place.

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That's a mighty fine anvil mate, awesome stuff. Can't imagine there would be many other HB anvils here in Australia. Be good to catch up again, Hans is planning another hammer in at his workshop next weekend I think, will see you there.

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