Guest Ser Menalak

Vaughan Hammer Head Blue Coating

Recommended Posts

Guest Ser Menalak

Hello all,

I just got my Vaughan 2 1/2lbs cross pein hammer in the mail. I am displeased by this aweful blue coating on the head. It's a shiny blue that covers everything but the actual face and a big VAUGHAN right on the side. The hammer itself seems great but I really like the old school look and this doesnt do it for me. The pictures on amazon and Vaughans website show a black hammer head. I know it doesn't effect the usefullness but when I spend money I want to enjoy the looks of something. Does anyone know if this stuff comes off through use, do you guys use hammers with coatings, and if not where do you get new hammers without any coating over them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hammers are not made on demand. The tooling is set up and a group of hammers is produced. They are not sold at the same time so some effort is made to protect the hammer from rust and getting moved around. Your hammer is sent so it arrives in good condition and ready to be dressed to your liking.

If you want a bare metal hammer, then request it when you make the purchase. What did they say when you contacted them about the paint and what did they suggest for removing it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Ser Menalak

I sent them an email about 20 minutes ago so I will likely not hear till Monday. Where do you guys get new hammers, if at all? Do yours have coatings on them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a pretty superficial criterion for judging a tool. I find it hard to believe you'd actually whine about factory paint on a new tool on a public forum.

Don't like the color? Buy paint or sand it off and let it rust.

If something like this is important to you, I don't think blacksmithing is for you. The steel doesn't care, the fire doesn't care, NO THING about the craft gives an itsy bitsy bit of a diddly doo what you feel. It's up to YOU to learn the tools, materials and craft. The little stuff is a waste of time. The iron doesn't care though waste all you want, it'll just keep on returning to dirt.

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shiny sells, whether it is apples in the grocery store, or hammers and shovels in the hardware store (ironmonger to you Brits). If it is rusty, they will move on down the line, or expect a deep discount.

I have found that a wire cup wheel on a side grinder is indispensable for removing paint from metal, and a steel scraper for removing varnish from wooden handles. Broken window glass works too, but requires more care in handling and storage. Mineral oil on a rag works a treat for a tool finish.

Most blacksmiths will radically reshape a wooden handle to fit their hand and style, I personally like an octagonal Coke bottle shape. I have been in commercial shops where they had a low speed belt sander dedicated to that purpose, all the rest were high speed belt grinders for shaping metal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plenty of ways to remove paint. Graffiti Remover in the spray can works well. Also so does several different gel type removers that you brush on. The old wire wheel in a grinder is always an option as well.

I hear you on coatings. I recently picked up a Diamond rounding hammer that had a clear finish all over the head that I had to remove so I could use it on hot metal. No big deal though, I simply sanded it off when I dresses the head before use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a new peddinghaus hammer about 20 years ago, around the same time I got a vaughn hot hardie.  Painted black and blue respectively.  Both are pretty much just rust colored now from wear and tear.  Power wire brush will make quick work of paint, but be careful. 

If a guy wants his tools to look a certain way then so be it, no big deal.  Perhaps he's a reenactor or works in a museum.  His tools, his choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Ser Menalak

That's a pretty superficial criterion for judging a tool. I find it hard to believe you'd actually whine about factory paint on a new tool on a public forum.

 

Don't like the color? Buy paint or sand it off and let it rust.

 

If something like this is important to you, I don't think blacksmithig is for you. The steel doesn't care, the fire doesn't care, NO THING about the craft gives an itsy bitsy bit of a diddly doo what you feel. It's up to YOU to learn the tools, materials and craft. The little stuff is a waste of time. The iron doesn't care though waste all you want, it'll just keep on returning to dirt.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

 

I consider my guns a tool but I absolutely care how they look. This is no different. I'm getting a message from the hot iron, its telling me it doesn't give a diddly doo about your self righteous rant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Ser Menalak

Shiny sells, whether it is apples in the grocery store, or hammers and shovels in the hardware store (ironmonger to you Brits). If it is rusty, they will move on down the line, or expect a deep discount.

 

I have found that a wire cup wheel on a side grinder is indispensable for removing paint from metal, and a steel scraper for removing varnish from wooden handles. Broken window glass works too, but requires more care in handling and storage. Mineral oil on a rag works a treat for a tool finish.

 

Most blacksmiths will radically reshape a wooden handle to fit their hand and style, I personally like an octagonal Coke bottle shape. I have been in commercial shops where they had a low speed belt sander dedicated to that purpose, all the rest were high speed belt grinders for shaping metal.

 

 

Plenty of ways to remove paint. Graffiti Remover in the spray can works well. Also so does several different gel type removers that you brush on. The old wire wheel in a grinder is always an option as well.

 

I hear you on coatings. I recently picked up a Diamond rounding hammer that had a clear finish all over the head that I had to remove so I could use it on hot metal. No big deal though, I simply sanded it off when I dresses the head before use.

 

 

I bought a new peddinghaus hammer about 20 years ago, around the same time I got a vaughn hot hardie.  Painted black and blue respectively.  Both are pretty much just rust colored now from wear and tear.  Power wire brush will make quick work of paint, but be careful. 

 

If a guy wants his tools to look a certain way then so be it, no big deal.  Perhaps he's a reenactor or works in a museum.  His tools, his choice.

 

Thanks guys for these replies. I will probably use it a while and see how it goes. I do also have actual older hammers so I have a fair mix now. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ser Menalak, Your hot iron seems to be very knowledgeable. Learn all you can from it. 

 

12,266 posts leads me to think Frosty may know something about blacksmithing.

 

Your decide which is the better source for information and please let us know. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can add me to your 'ranter' list. You could have removed the paint in about the same amount of time you spent with your post and replies.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think Ser Menalak got off to a very good start on this forum...'jus sayin'

 

Kinda like the fella who walked into a lion's cage wearing a pork chop suit!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Menalak I don't like paint on hot work tools either. Clean it off with a power wire brush and use it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

make the hammer you want to use, it will have a coating of scale on it unless you clean it off, regular use prevents rust on the working parts and you could add a thin coating of wax on non working parts if you want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay guys, I apologize for engaging in this subject in the first place, my bad. I'm afraid I was just so surprised someone would E-mail Vaughn because s/he doesn't like the color they paint their hammers I just started typing. I mean REALLY. What kind of priority is that? Vaughn has been painting their tools blue for how much more than a hundred years? Every tool company I know of paints their tools if they're not chromed.

 

All you guys who value how your tools look more than how they work that's just fine. Not saying anybody needs my permission, approval or anything, they are YOUR tools do with them as you wish. If you apply the same value system to your firearms . . . well, I'll never have to trust you at my back, just try not to hurt anybody else. Please.

 

Again, I apologize for engaging in this thread and especially my initial reply. When you get your tools just perfect, please post a picture of them in their frame.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lol @ frosty. While we're at it I wish to complain that every tool I get from my blacksmith is covered in scale and barely wire wheeled off. Its as though he's too busy to pay attention to the xxxx that actually matters! I bet you I get 3 or 4 hammers a year without even a spot of paint.. dont even get me started on his tongs! Lol

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, whodathunk! This discussion could have got so heated???

I've seen hammers/tools painted dayglo pink, green, orange etc. And maybe yellow anvils are better than green ones? Some folk just like them painted, other want to id them, I color my tools to indicate where they belong etc.

Thank the lord, that we have the freedom (and the funds) to choose whether we want thing painted or not! To each his own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of my tools are "old rust" coloured, some with additional oil or wax or linseed oil.  I think I have a couple that are painted; the areas that come into contact with redhot iron/steel don't keep the paint long.

 

In general I buy used hammers and so a run over them with a wire wheel to remove loose rust, some facing work with a belt grinder if needed and then I re-set the handle and trim it even with the top and stick in a oven tray with about 3/8" linseed oil in it.  when it wicks above the hammer head I take it out wipe off the oil with a rag wiping oil over the head and then I toss the rag in in the coal forge.  I like the "old" look; nothing wrong with painting the non-contact surfaces or gold plating them for that matter to each his own!  Now if you coat the contact surface I'd say you were one blow short of a forge weld...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ianinsa, I think you're right.

 

Collectors have a different set of values than users.  Often something that's popular with users for being truly excellent won't attract the attention of collectors because it's too common.

 

However in the context of a blacksmithing forum it does seem odd to balk at the notion of customizing metal objects to your liking.  After all, for most of us -that's pretty much the entire point of what we're doing.

 

I once had an apprentice comment on the finish of my lineman's pliers.  He asked where I'd found ones with that level of polish.  I replied "Ten years of use."  To that end I can admit that I take a measure of pride in having tools that look like they were cared for by a person who works with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a hammer I bought at a flea market that I use all the time at the anvil, it was also painted blue for some reason.  I now have a nice collection of blue flakes mixed in with the scale around the bottom of the anvil, seems every strike takes more of it off, but so what?   Doesn't impact the hammer performance.    Just sayin'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My standard snarky reply to those who worship antique tools is: "This ain't no Cracker Barrel, I only buy stuff that I intend to use, and use hard!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's the description of the hammer from their site: 

 

"Polished striking face and ends of pein are generously beveled to minimize chipping. Rust resistant blue finish on smooth ground sides. Flame treated hickory handle, "Sure-Lock®" wedged in tapered eye."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry I didn't see this when it was current. I will try to be brief. I couldn't help notice the OP is not a legitimate member (I didn't know guests could post) But I digress.

 

In my humble opinion, contrary to the OP's comment to Frosty, guns are not the same as hammers. Guns can be called "tools" depending on your use or profession, but they are weapons. Hammers are not (at least by design). Case in point: A Marine probably won't go to the brig for having a rusty entrenching tool (folding shovel). However, if he was negligent enough to allow his weapon to become rusty, he could certainly face charges that could result in loss of rank and pay and even imprisonment. 

 

'If the coating offends thee, remove it' <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plenty of ways to remove paint. Graffiti Remover in the spray can works well. Also so does several different gel type removers that you brush on. The old wire wheel in a grinder is always an option as well.

 

I hear you on coatings. I recently picked up a Diamond rounding hammer that had a clear finish all over the head that I had to remove so I could use it on hot metal. No big deal though, I simply sanded it off when I dresses the head before use.

 

Our Diamond rounders came with those coatings, too! I didn't realize it at first, went out and fired up the forge, and started hammering on a piece of steel and the most awful smell emitted from the hammer lol. I've pretty well gotten rid of the majority of it from use. Some of the black paint on the rest of the hammer head is finally starting to wear off too. 

I"m not real big on coatings on hammers... but the way I look at is that until it's all worked off or burned off from use, it'll just keep the rust off of 'er for that much longer! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.