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Professional Smithing by Donald Streeter?

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I have one!  I enjoyed it!  I especially was interested in his jigs for bending staples... though the illustrations are not quite clear enough to be sure of the details!  Anybody have something like that that they will share?

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It's well worth the read. The one and only negative comment I have seen is ,it's not for a beginning smith. I agree it's not. I've found it helpful and interesting.
Marc

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If you go to ABE.com you'll find that the book has been reprinted and is available from Powell books in Portland.

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Yes, it's worth getting.  Even if you don't focus on the particular items outlined in the book it's worth it for the descriptions of techniques and processes.

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I started shoeing in 1963 and then poco a poco, I found out about smithing. When I rented my little shop in the late 60's, I had no idea whether anyone else was doing what I was going to do. No internet. I felt like the lone stranger. Then, in 1971, Tom Bredlow from Tucson visited my shop. He was one of a few of what I call "fire keepers" who were forging ornamental work when blacksmithing was almost dead. Soon after, I found out about Donald Streeter, Francis Whitaker, Carl Jennings, and Philip Simmons. They were all working before the blacksmithing "revival" in the 1970's. Streeter forged Colonial styled hardware out of Franklinville, New Jersey, for quite a few years, and then retired to California. HIs work was sent worldwide, and he kept busy. His book is good, but he assumes you have been in the fire and know something already. He was a "walking antiquarian" in terms of his knowledge of Colonial period ironwork. He put out a nice little catalog; you'd be lucky to find a copy today.

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If you are interested in or practice an art and there is a book on the subject then it should be in your library.  If and when one gets to know everything about a subject I feel sorry for them.  I find it impossible to read a book on a subject that I'm interested in, or have knowledge of and not learn something from the book, maybe not every page but something.  Must be the reason I have such a large library and small bank account.  Maybe my next subject better be Economics. 

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Thanks chaps that is much appreciated. 

 

Frank - thanks for taking the time to write that, it was interesting. 

 

I'll never claim to know a lot but I dare say I know a little. I've found a hardback copy on ebay that suits my bank manager just fine. 

 

All the best 

 

Andy

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On Streeter's book I like Almost everything in it, Except his description of his suggested hammer technique. He advocates a thumb on top of the haft of the hammer, which will trash most peoples hands way too quickly. He apparently had a very light grip on the hammer and very durable joints...

I have to agree with Gerald, be selective in the books you invest in. I try to be humble enough to try and learn from all kinds of sources, but I try to focus my learning and my stylistic influences on books and artists that I respect and agree with. I like Streeter, I like Yellin, and I like a lot of the German kuntschmidts. I like Hofi, Habermann, and Brazeal. I read and learned something's from Bealer and Wenger, but after growing and learning more I have disregarded most of those. After you have reached a certain level of knowledge you plateau and the pearls of wisdom that help you become better are fewer and farther between normally. You have to work at getting better, and you have to have the humility to look for those pearls in unexpected places. Or try to find opportunities to learn from guys who are further down the path, or who just took a different path and have a different skill set. Books are like friends you want really good ones.

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I worked for Donald and his brother Guy in 1965 after High School.  Donald was the artist doing the box locks including keys and brass knobs and ran the business.  Guy did most of the heavy work Strap Hinges, H hinges, Shutter Dogs, etc.  Guy was amazing, He could produced 4-5 pairs of strap hinges including the fire welding an hour.  They both were real gentlemen. I wish I was able to stay, but economics prevented it.

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Welcome aboard Geo, glad to have you. If you'll put your general location in the header you might discover Iforge members living within visiting distance.

We'd love to hear more about your experiences with the Streeter brothers and see some of your own work. We LOVE pictures.

Frosty The Lucky.

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