Clint B

Hardy tool help.....

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This came with the HB anvil I just bought, not sure what it was designed to do. I'm assuming that the flattened area is from use. Can these be reshaped and what would be the best method to use?

 

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Looks like a hardie fuller, or a real abused hot cut. You can dress it for fuller use with a belt grinder or an abrasive flap wheel.

 

Steve

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Looks like a cold cut hardy that's been used for both hot and cold, lost it's temper, and flattened out. Fuller, or might be able to dress it and heat treat as a cold cut hardy? Dunno.

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The *best* way would be to forge, grind, weld or a mix of them depending on YOUR skills, YOUR equipment and YOUR needs and details of the item you haven't provided to us.

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Welder and grinders I've got and can use them, no working forge yet. My needs are undetermined at this time since I haven't started using it yet. As far as details of the item........ all I know is it fits in the hardy hole and looks a bit flattened out on the edge. My main concern it the hardness of the metal and what grinding will do to it.

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If you don't know what you will be wanting it for why modify it until you do?  Saves a lot of the "I need a bottom fuller to make tongs---too bad I made this one into a hot cut hardy?

 

Have you checked the hardness with a file?  Looks fairly soft from the abuse signs.  Generally if you are moderate with a grinder it will do less than placing 1800 degF metal on it and hitting the metal.  (grinding "blue" is around 500 degF)

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You are right! What it was doesn't mean that's what it has to be.

 

I haven't tested hardness yet but will do so. I'm probably getting a bit ahead of myself since my forge isn't ready yet, in the mean time I'll be lurking on this site gleaning as much info as I can. I have A LOT to learn!

 

Thanks!

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I recommend you clean up the rough edges with a grinder and make it into a bottom fuller.  While a hot cut hardy may be more useful, I feel they are easier to make as a lone blacksmith.  Making a fuller hardy requires a handled top swage tool and a striker (I've only seen one method of making one, there is probably a way to make one alone).

 

You can use the fuller to make your first hot cut hardy tool, by putting your piece on top of the hardy with the stem of the hot cut piece in-line with the length of the fuller and hitting it with a cross pein hammer oriented the same way.

 

Just look at some examples of bottom fullers and decide on what radius you can achieve with minimal material loss.

 

 

Does the tool have a maker's mark by any chance? 

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No makers mark that I can see. The material seems pretty soft, I touched up the edges with a file. I'm thinking a fuller is most likely the first stop for this piece.

 

Thanks Guys!

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Personally, I'd get the forge up and running and then draw that sucker out into a hot cut.  The hot cut is one of those tools that you can use on just about every project, especially in the neophyte phase of blacksmithing.  A bottom fuller is nice, but hardly necessary.

 

With an operating forge, it would take all of ten minutes to draw that mangled edge back into shape.  I just did the same basic thing yesterday and have a very nice hot-cut to show for it.

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A bottom fuller increases the size of stock you can start with... Probably pretty useful to a new smith. A hot cut can be made with the bottom fuller, or you can just use a hot cut chisel. Not as easy to cut to the center in larger stock, but still quite handy. And if the steel didn't hold up to being a hot cut Hardie the first time why would it work any better this time...

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