Eddie Mullins

Buffalo Forge 616 post drill

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I recently acquired a complete and functional Buffalo Forge 616 post drill. It turns freely and is in ready to use condition, save some surface rust. I have a 1/2 inch straight shanked chuck ordered so I can use modern drill bits. I don't expect this drill to replace my electric press, but do hope to put it to occasional use at least.

 

I want to eliminate the current and prevent future rust, so my plans are to disassemble and then a soak in the electrolysis tank, followed by some gently wire brushing, and then a coating of something for a rust preventative. I don't really want to paint it, but might consider a clear coat. After reading blackfrog's anvil cleaning thread, I am think about one of the products he recommended, but am open to suggestions.

 

I was also wondering if anyone was familiar with the variable speed arrangement on these drills. The handle can be moved between 2 different sized drive gears but I just can't see what the slower speed is needed for? The one thing I don't like about this arrangement is the longer handle design and the lack of length adjustablity found on other models. I have actually made a new shorter handle to reduce the length and required motion for each rotation.

 

This drill seems to have been configured for flat belt usage. I am assuming for a line drive shop arrangement. Has my mine turning about a pedal powered potential.

 

 

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On most two speed post drills the high speed is used for smaller bits and the low for larger bits. You will have to experiment a bit to find what bits to use in what range. For example 1/4" and under are going to need more RPMs than the low speed will provide and the 1" and above will need less than the high.

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Greetings Ed.

 

Congrats on your post vise find... Frogs method of finish works just fine for finish..  I have restored many drills and found just a wire brushing works well.  The two speeds on your press is designed for slower for thicker metal and the faster for wood..   The reason for the longer handle on yours is that with a flat belt drive you do not have the advantage of a flywheel in the manual mode..  Also the handle is so you can slip it in and lock your drill chuck... The flat belt would not hold to lock the older style chucks..  A great suggestion for that model would be to keep a look out for a flywheel if you do not plan on a flat belt drive system..   Have fun and if I can help give me a shout..

 

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim

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Jim - I was wondering if you could elaborate a little on the flywheel. Having no experience with either configuration, I'm not real clear on what advantage the flywheel affords. I am also a bit lost on the need to use the handle to lock the chuck.

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Greetings again Ed,

 

The flywheel stores energy and makes for a smoother operation..  The drill you have has a split pulley one drive and one free.. The reason is so the drill drive can be engaged to the line shaft.   When you try to lock a drill in that type of chuck it will try to torque back .. That's where the handle comes in..  If you want  you can improve the operation a little by locking the drive wheels together and they will serve as a small flywheel...  Pictured a Buffalo with a flywheel .  I have several and use them all the time..  Have fun

 

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim                                                          

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Thanks Thomas and Jim. I might keep an eye out for a flywheel or maybe engineer a make do one myself. BTW, I got the Jacob's chuck installed and of course had to poke a few holes. I can adjust the feed rate with a set screw, and decided surely faster must be better, but discovered that is not so, at least for metal, bent a bit. I think i was feeding faster than I was drilling. Probably fine for wood, but now know to slow it down for hard materials.

 

I also purchased a 2nd drill the same day as this one. No fly wheel there either, and no shaft there to mount one. There's nothing on the side opposite the handle.  It has no markings on it so don't know who made it. The table is missing and the feed lever is broken, but I can make those. Maybe I'll post pics later to see if it can be identified.

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Greetings Ed,

 

Adjust your toggle stop so that the feed only clicks once on the gear..  Still havin fun?

 

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim

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Great drill Eddie and Jim, that's a fantastic setup.

 

 

I have several and use them all the time..

 

Can you advise me as to what benefits (if any) these have over a modern drill press. I know where I can get a post drill and I tend to prefer older manual tools, but I'm struggling to justify the post drill.

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Greetings Gray,

 

What can I say... 80 years old and cordless...  You can control the feed and speed to dead slow without belt adjustments..  I teach a lot of students and I show them how to use the drill press....  The only problem is their fathers pick up on it and there gone for an hour playing with my drill.... Next question ... Were can I buy one... LOL ..  If you are in to production not so good .... Just a little fun with function ... A blast..   Last count 17 and if another comes along it will most likely find a home at my shop...  Have fun

 

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim                          

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80 years old and cordless

Yes I like cordless drills, here's some I bought recently

 

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I've been doing some research on post drills and think I finally "get" how they work and I like it. I can see that manually winding up the feed after every drill could be a bit annoying, maybe one with a lever feed like the Champion #200 would be a good choice.

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Greetings again Gray,

 

Give more thought to a lever feed style..  I have 2 and you will find the muscles you use to feed and pull the lever becomes cumbersome..  You tend to put uneven pressure on the drill...  Just my 2c  Small Champions and Buffalos with auto feed work great... Acme is another good one...   Nice collection of cordless...  Have fun..

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim

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OK, thanks for the advice. I'll have a look at the ones I know about in town and see what type they are.

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Can you advise me as to what benefits (if any) these have over a modern drill press. I know where I can get a post drill and I tend to prefer older manual tools, but I'm struggling to justify the post drill.

 

I don't think there are any advantages over a modern drill press, except that the slow speed of a post drill is easier on your drill bits. Also good if you don't have power. But they just look so cool, you have to have one in the shed just for the atmosphere.

 

Try to pick up one that still has the self-feed lever - with one hand cranking and the other holding a workpiece, there's a shortage of hands to work the downfeed...

 

Cheers,  Vann.

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I know where there are 2 drills and I checked them out today, both Dawn brand but I couldn't see a model #, both have auto feed in place as far as I could tell, but the owner wasn't there so I couldn't get to have a good inspection.

 

 

But they just look so cool, you have to have one in the shed just for the atmosphere.

Ain't that a fact :)

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I know where there are 2 drills and I checked them out today, both Dawn brand but I couldn't see a model #, both have auto feed in place as far as I could tell, but the owner wasn't there so I couldn't get to have a good inspection.

 

Ain't that a fact :)

 

If they are post mounted I' almost guarantee they will be a Dawn 611, the larger dawn with two speed is quiet rare to find.  If they come with a stand and no auto feed they will be the small 600.  The 611 had an option to come with a stand but most came as post mount.

 

I have several Dawns, including an original prototype.  The Dawn was copied form the Canadian Blower of the same model number 611, but has slight differences, like round vs square table.

 

I also have a Silver 1½ and No 21. 

 

 

 

Eddie,  They two belt pulleys are known as slow and fast pulleys.  The idea is the line shaft keeps spinning so you slip the belt from the fast (drive pulley) to the slow pulley which acts as an idler. 

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Eddie,  They two belt pulleys are known as slow and fast pulleys.  The idea is the line shaft keeps spinning so you slip the belt from the fast (drive pulley) to the slow pulley which acts as an idler. 

 

Thanks.

 

It'll probably just be for grins and giggles, but at some point I'm just gonna have to rig up a pedal or treadle foot powered belt to this drill : ) .

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Eddie,  They two belt pulleys are known as slow and fast pulleys.  The idea is the line shaft keeps spinning so you slip the belt from the fast (drive pulley) to the slow pulley which acts as an idler. 

Hi FXS. I thought they were "loose" and "fast" pulleys - "fast" as in fastened (to the shaft - nothing to do with speed)

 

 


I also have a Silver 1½ and No 21. 

 

I like the looks of Silver post drills. They have style and the curved spokes of the flywheels are classic. I have a No.14 that I'm cleaning up at present (needs repairs - sigh), and have just bought a No.22 that I won't get to see for months (it's 450 miles away - and I'm not heading that way until January).

 

Cheers,  Vann.

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Thanks FlyingXS, sounds like they are 611s then. I'll try to get more info next time I'm in town.

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Just picked up a 616 for $100 , the only thing wrong with it  { other than it needs a overhaul} is the weight for the racket and pawl has snapped off, this I can and have replaced before on another of my 612 drills.  ..................BUT , the best be is that it has it mounting plate , which I have never seen before.

 

this makes 3 Buffalo Forge Post Drills , One day I will have the whole set.

 

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Needs some work but nice for $100 I think, at least in Oz. I spotted the "Shire of Mulgrave" on the bin, I worked up that way a few years ago.

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...the best be is that it has it mounting plate , which I have never seen before.

Most post drills came from the factory with a wooden mounting board. That's the first I've seen with a steel mounting plate.

 

 

...the only thing wrong with it is the weight for the rachet and pawl has snapped off...

Same problem as I have with my Canadian Blower & Forge No.61.

 

Cheers,  Vann.

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Eddie and JTF, I have a 616 also. I bought about a year ago for $25US at a farm auction. It had been sitting outside in weeds for a while and it still needs to be lubed to point of working. It did have one piece missing however. The small gear for hand crank, and I have no dimensions that I can find for it anywhere. Would either of you be able to measure and let me know? I would like to buy one some day but dont think I am going to carry around with me till I find one. Thanks ...

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I wouldn't mind measuring mine for you at all, the trouble will be the remembering to do it : ) . You might want to shoot me a PM if haven't seen something from me in a few days.

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