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I Forge Iron

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Hi, my version of a blueprint. Not much but it's mine. Pic runs the gamut from coilspring (on the horn) to finished product. (left to right). Yes you've seen the handled one before.

 

 

Take coilspring and cut off a length. Anneal, or if you're feeling really antsy, normalize, but let's face it. Used coil spring tends to crack, so I'd anneal first, and you'll still lose a few. Square it off, fuller down to about 1/4 to 3/8 inch. Put a chisel point on one end, thin profile works better.

 

Cut to desired length. I like about 7 inches or so, but it'll work pretty much between 4 to 9 inches. put a tang on the other end. Long skinny square taper for burnt in, like mine. If ya want rivetted, well flatten it and go with that. Now the fun part.

 

Put desired twists in. I like a reverse near the tip, and one wide spaced long twist above it. But variety is the spice of life..... For phillips heads, you can forge or grind in a triangle tip. Straighten as needed with a wooden mallet on a stump. 

 

Harden the business end and temper. IMPORTANT! You can go from straw to blue, but if you don't harden, it'll round out over time and start to slip unless reground. Clean on the wire wheel.

 

Make a handle as desired, predrill with a small hole and heat the tang, and push into the hole. It might take two or three times, but get it straight! You don't get a second chance.  I haven't tried it with horn, but I bet it would look awesome. In wood, ya can always burn in your touchmark or logo. Finish as desired, I like linseed oil.

 

Fun, classes up your tools a bit, and doesn't take long at all. It would probably be a good project for beginners too. Good luck!

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Not a bad blueprint unspecial guy, brings back memories. The first and only jr. high school project involving forging was a screw driver. We didn't get to do anything so fancy though. How do they work?

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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They work pretty good. Usually takes a touch of grinding/hit on the sander to get the profile narrow enough. Getting the angle right on phillips version took a couple of times playing to get right.

 

I want to do a fancy full basic set of "home" tools, including box wrenches. Maybe instead of twists, which would tend to make them a bit wide, some engraving or a little file work. Saws too. I've seen crowbar sets done with crow head motif worked in. Maybe even play with squaring and twisting a ratchet. Have to take the chrome off of course....

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The way the instructor showed us it was really simple. We drew the blade and cleaned it up on the grinder to as near a factory profile as we could. The last step he showed us was to lay the blade on edge sideways and touch the coarse wheel so the striations from the wheel were across the blade. He said it helped it grip the screw head, I don't know if that's true but it's what he showed us.

 

The handle I made was scales rather than a round handle on a shank. I got to spend more time at the anvil that way. <wink>

 

I gave it to Dad and the last time I saw it it was on the wall above his CB base station, I don't know if he ever used it. It was okay useful if you used it on the right size screw.

 

Practice would hone the skill no doubt.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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