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traditions for opening a new shop?

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Are there any traditions for opening a new blacksmith shop?

 

   I have been self-unemployed in the oilfield for the last 20 years building downhole tools and in my current shop for the last 7 years.  When I bought this location it came with 2 buildings, one is 11,000 sq ft the other 6,500 sq ft.  Figuring there is no way to outgrow a11,000 sq ft building so I set up inventory racks and offices in the front, assembly in the middle and I reserved the back corner of the shop for the stuff that keeps me some what sane, welding and fab work.  I leased out the 6,500 sq ft shop to another outfit.

 

  7 years of unbelievable  growth latter (THANK YOU DEAR LORD !!!)  and picking up the bad habit of blacksmithing and I'm out of room!  The last large fab project I did ( and it wasn't that large) had me on a forklift  moving tables, forges, and anvils out of the way just to flip it over.  Its time for some more room!

 

   I was able to split the back shop in 2 and re-lease 1/2 to the same outfit that has had it for 5 years and keep 3,500 sq ft.

 

I am thinking about naming this new part of my business "John Galt Forge",  so are there any traditions that must be upheld when starting a new blacksmith shop other than taking a vow of poverty? :P

 

Thanks

 

Russell 

 

 

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This is hearsay. I heard that in the long-ago days, the anvil was placed outside the smithy doorway on the ground. Then, the smith had to pick it up, carry it across the threshold (like a bride) and place it on its stump or stand where it was to be used.

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Russell,

In case you aren't aware, there is an new Blacksmith group in your area.  It is Goliad Forge.  I met the President (Otto Bluntzer) at a couple of group events that we attended.  If you don't have the contact information, PM me and I will get it to you.  Good luck, Jerry

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First work should be a cross, then hang it on the wall and let the cross and workshop be blessed.

At least this is how it was/ is done in Germany

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Bit of silver under the newly placed anvil.....  always a great idea.

 

You really need to carry the fire from the working shop over to light the forge in the new shop.  That old shop's forge was productive and you want that spirit to continue in the new place, so bring the fire with you.  Muy importante!

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Oh, this is an easy one.    Hemorrhage money, accumulate junk. Works whether you like it or not.   Take care( and earnestly, best of luck), Matt

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Thanks for the advice guys!!  Im going to go pull a silver dollar out of hiding and put it under the anvil before I strike the first blow on it,  and a Fredricks' cross sounds like a fine first project!

 

Jerry W.,  Mr. Bluntzer and his wife were nice enough to come by yesterday and give some advice on placement of equipment.  Mr. and Mrs. B. are some fine people.

 

I will post some Pictures as things come along.

 

Thank you

 

Russell Doerr

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Why not start your own tradition.  Something like

 

Always collect a profit on each item made in your shop. (what a concept LOL)

 

At the end of each day, put one penny representing each item you made that day into a large(ish) container.  Throw in a nickel for each item sold. Do not open the container until it is full or at the end of the year. You will now have an accounting of how many items you made and sold, as well as some loose change. 

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I'll let everyone know when the BBQ will be!!   Brisket, beans and all the trimmings,  anyone who wants to drive to Victoria Tx is welcome.  I have been to barn raisings and a derrick raisings but never a Forge Firing. 

 

I guess  I did kind of start my own tradition, I finally got around to hanging up some signs I have been holding onto.  One from my first company,  one from my first customer,  one from my dads last shop,  and one from the SOBs who said they would run me out of business.  They are all gone now and I mess all of them.

 

Thanks guys..

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We had a shop warming for Moony to celebrate his new shop (Lets all get hammered at Moonys) 8 years later we still meet on that weekend to all "Get hammered at Moonys".  Seems like we have started a tradition.

 

Phil

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Well I got a better start on moving then I expected to!  As soon as my shop manager got wind of my plan He started palletizing all of my stuff and moving it for me :D  Not sure what he's trying to tell me.

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Hope those are pics of the new place!   I took a bunch of garden rake heads and screwed them to my wall girts to make holders for tools.  Have a set of files using golfball handles mounted that way right over my workbench with my filing vise on it.

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friends buy the smith a keg of whatever they want and then they all come over for a party and everyone drinks until people start puking in the quench bucket for lack of a outhouse. Sounds like a grand time to me. 

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Thanks for the idea Thomas!!  I will be putting it to use.

 

Toothygrin,  that kinda reminds me of a song from my dance hall days

 

   " In heaven there is no Beer "

   " That's why we drink it here "

   " and when we go up there "

   " All our friends will be drinking all our beer "

 

Put a German accent and a umpapa beat to it and you have Weesatche hall circa 1980 something

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You will be reminded of that vow of poverty in the future, I hope you get to break it.
The shop looks too small already, not enough space for really big projects, I suggest you start planning the extension soon so that you know where you want to put everything in six months time when it is built. Other than that, good luck in your endeavours and enjoy your new shop. These photos will be interesting to review in a years time when compared to the shop then.
Andrew

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That's a good idea using a pallet for a table top, you can store hammers, tongs, etc. AND it'd make a good layout table with room to clamp components through the table top. I think the only change I'd make is putting legs on it so I could get at the things I'd drop through it. (voice of experience there you betcha. <wink>)

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks Frosty I will do that!

 

   I did something by accident that turned out pretty cool when I built my welding table a few years ago.  I had a bunch of 2 ft long 2-7/8" 6.4 PPF EUE pup joints hat had failed inspection and a bunch of used couplings for them. I welded one end of the pup to the bottom of the table top and made a coupling up on the other end a little more than hand tight..  flipped the table over and used a pipe wrench to screw in of out on the couplings to level the table.

 

 

 

RWD

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