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Derrick55

What is this spiked device?

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I'm doing some research on the device in the photos below, anyone know what it is? The owner of it has three of them. I'd like to find a reference for it although I'm sure it's possible that someone just made it from their own design.

 

 

pic3214a.jpg

 

 

pic3214c.jpg

 

 

pic3214e.jpg

 

 

I have my own theory on what it is but would like to hear some other opinions before I tell it.

 

Thanks for taking a look.

 

 

 

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My "guess" would be cooking gear for large roasts in fireplace cooking.  I can't dig into my books right now though.

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The spikes are very thick, it would really damage
and dry out a roast.
My first thought was it would hammer into wood or ice to haul it by the u shaped handle (I assumed there would be a rope through it or something) but as was mentioned above it doesn't have any adjustability, it looks like it can only be locked with the pin at that one setting. Maybe to clamp on deer legs for hanging and butchering?

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I think it is for hanging something big.  Like a bear or moose, or hogzilla.  It looks like you can keep it closed by tying rope around the top U shaped bar to the lower 90 degree bar.  But, I'm not sure about this because of the very large teeth.  Someone did put a lot of work into making this.  

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Deb thinks it's for roasting potatoes.

 

The "handle" side isn't for human hands but looks like it's designed to fit a receiver of some sort and hinge. I'm thinking it's for hanging carcasses, maybe on a conveyor or revolving rack in a slaughter house.

 

I'd think tenterhooks would work better but . . . ?

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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My first thought was it's something used in the logging industry. Perhaps to grab logs or roll logs into place.
Whatever it is, it's well made and would certainly take a powerful bite.

Edit: Nah, it closes up too tightly for logging. Hard to judge the scale - how big is it?

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My "guess" would be cooking gear for large roasts in fireplace cooking.  I can't dig into my books right now though.

 

That's what I was thinking but I haven't been able to prove it.

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My first thought was it's something used in the logging industry. Perhaps to grab logs or roll logs into place.
Whatever it is, it's well made and would certainly take a powerful bite.

Edit: Nah, it closes up too tightly for logging. Hard to judge the scale - how big is it?

 

It's about 18" long, here is a photo of it with a 12" ruler:

pic3214j.jpg

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I was thinking it looked like a tool to grab onto something slippery with. -Like when flensing a whale.

Couldn't find it in any whaling videos though, they just used ordinary hooks, or it didn't show in frame.

Also the stradling arms with the two hinge barrels look a bit flimsy, as if they're to be used upright.

Maybe a fireplace tool would be the best bet, but for cooking? I wouldn't do that to my meat, and it looks to be a complicated answer to a simple problem if it indeed was intended for meat.

 

Looks like they also should come with a chain, with that outside hook.

 

PS. It's spikes are so massive I'm left with the impression that it's to hold something in the fire that you really don't care about. Like a bale of peat. Or blubber, but then again, why not just chuck it in a pot?

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The tubes or knuckles at the ends of the fork are for a rod to pass through, not a rope or wire.  Anything flexible would just allow the fork to collapse under a load.

 

It almost reminds me of some kind of combing device you'd use for threshing hay, wheat, thatch or the like.  The teeth aren't for biting in, but separating and aligning the fibers.  Possibly a part of a larger steam-powered machine that processed thatch for roofing or removed the heads from wheat or corn stalks.

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It's definitely not a hetchel or ripple  The mounting cylinders do not look like they are designed for heavy weights.  Are there any wear marks on them?   Also look at the weld where the swinging arm set up attaches to the main body; again not a strong joint so I would say not much weight/force involved.  Any hint on what country these are from?  Or location?  If found in Death Valley California they probably did not get used in NE USA whaling...If Australian---????

 

It looks like it "grabs" something that has some give to it as the spikes are large and the bars they are mounted on would not be expected to "spring" a lot in use 

 

I did a fast glance through 4 books on antique ironwork/cooking implements and did not see anything similar

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It's definitely not a hetchel or ripple  The mounting cylinders do not look like they are designed for heavy weights.  Are there any wear marks on them?   Also look at the weld where the swinging arm set up attaches to the main body; again not a strong joint so I would say not much weight/force involved.  Any hint on what country these are from?  Or location?  If found in Death Valley California they probably did not get used in NE USA whaling...If Australian---????

 

It looks like it "grabs" something that has some give to it as the spikes are large and the bars they are mounted on would not be expected to "spring" a lot in use 

 

I did a fast glance through 4 books on antique ironwork/cooking implements and did not see anything similar

 

 

Someone found three of these in Pennsylvania, not sure exactly where. I didn't notice any wear marks but didn't really look for any. Thanks for checking your books.

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Here is my idea.  It's used in a picket line for horses.  It's actually upside down in the picture.  Turn it around, place the split end around a small tree, put a bar through it, and the teeth are hanging down now.  Put another small log/branch in the jaws, close the jaws, put in the pin and it secures the branch.  You need another one on the other end. You now have a rail to tie up the horses.  To much work?  It looks like something to hold a branch or log.  

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It looks pretty stocky, maybe to heavy to carry around to picket a horse or even a small herd.
Is there a chance it is some ones idea of art?
I have seen stranger.

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It doesn't seem we're agreeing just yet, so I want to dig some more.

-Are the two other objects just like the one in the picture? Do they look like the same smith made them, and if not, are the spikes as crude and blunt as in this one?

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methinks picket lines for horses were simply a rope tied to two trees and the horses tied to that rope.

mayhaps a manual bear trap????

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...a manual bear trap????

I'm guessing that you've never gotten up close and personal with a bear rthibeau ;-)

I don't think anyone would be daft enough, or suicidal enough, to manually trap a bear with some spiky contraption.

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watermelon roaster. Just kidding.

 

This has got to be the best answer yet !!!

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