angiolino

buying new multiprocess welder

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hello guys sorry if I am asking for your illustrious opinion.

 

I would buy for my small workshop in a multi-process welding inverter synergic new generation.  Of those that are running tig mig mag welding electrode conventional plasma cutting which brand do you recommend? a good efficient and reliable maybe cheap? thanks to those who will take you recommend course of the rising sun but not brands internationally renowned brands prestigious reliable with good performance and fewer defects and certified thanks again

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Most of the machines I've seen that have had a plasma cutter in the design tended to have issues and failed. I had someone explain the basics of why that tended to occur to me years ago, but I forget the details now.

 

None of the big name brands here in the US make welders that include a plasma cutter and from what I recall, the reason linked back to the issues that caused the other units to want to fail.

 

 

Plenty of good mig/ tig/ stick machines out there now, but I don't know what is available to you in Italy. At the tech school we use Miller XMT 304's to teach Mig, stick and DC tig and they are pretty much the standard in the industry. Fairly expensive used, but they can often be found at reasonable prices here used. There have recently been quite a few "homeowner" level multi purpose mig/tig/ stick machines brought out by a number of companies. Most are limited to lower outputs, but the prices new are more in line with the occasional user vs that of a full time shop.

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I'm sorry if you expect so much from you attach photos of the machines mentioned translating from Italian to English, the meaning changes a picture is worth a thousand words, however, I had suggested the miller the fronius the Lincon and hobart are not convinced of the esab and saf fo della cea italiana you who have experience and opinion?

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XMT 304 From Miller. Tech school has about 12 of them. I've used these a lot and they pretty much set the standard for multi purpose units in the industry.

 

http://www.millerwelds.com/products/multiprocess/xmt_304_cc_cv/

 

 

Millers Multimatic 200 is supposed to be a nice machine from those I've talked to that have used it. It's more a middle level machine, a bit pricy for most hobbyists, but lacks some in output for those who are really serious. Mig output is 200 amps, but stick/tig output is 150 amps.

 

http://www.millerwelds.com/products/multiprocess/product.php?model=M00361

 

 

 

 

As far as I know Hobart doesn't currently make a multi process machine, at least in the states. Hobart is owned by the same parent company as Miller and tends to "lag" behind about 2-3 years when Miller comes out with new items. I'd expect a unit to show up from Hobart in the next year or two, but be a simpler, lighter duty machine than the Multimatic 200 from what I've seen with past products like the Miller/Hobart dual voltage migs and their entry level tig machines.

 

 

 

Lincoln has a couple of possibilities, but I'm not all that familiar with Lincolns line up. For what ever reason Lincoln isn't as popular around here as Miller. However I know other areas where this is reversed, so there's nothing wrong with Lincoln machines.

 

 

ThermalArc/Tweeco is a relative newcomer in the multi process machines. I'm not sure if you have these or not where you are.  I know a number of guys who have gotten them and are quite happy with them. On average they are less money than comparable Millers/Lincolns, and in some cases have slightly more output. Victor is in the process of changing over their ThermalArc line to Tweeco. Right now their website on machines sucks. It's tough to pull up one page that shows their whole lineup. You have to pull up individual machines, and know what you are hunting for.

 

http://victortechnologies.com/tweco/products/prodList.html?brand=TWE&W2Code=TWE270000&W3Code=TWE374000&W4Code=TWE474300&W5Code=&W6Code=

 

http://victortechnologies.com/tweco/products/prodList.html?brand=TWE&W2Code=TWE270000&W3Code=TWE374000&W4Code=TWE474200&W5Code=&W6Code=

 

http://victortechnologies.com/tweco/products/prodList.html?brand=TWE&W2Code=TWE270000&W3Code=TWE374000&W4Code=TWE474100&W5Code=&W6Code=

 

http://victortechnologies.com/Thermal%20Arc%203in1/Fabricator%20252i/product_features.php

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thank you for your testimony I'll think I have advised the above multiprocess say they are like the food processor you use them 10 times and then break them remains without a car is a big investment thanks for your valuable contribution and for your advice if other had more info I invite them to intervene with the next

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I am considering buying a Miller multiprocess machine for my retirement business of semi pro blacksmithing and fab work especially to do my own iron work for the house i am building. The Miller Multimatic 200 looks like a good machine for my purposes.

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My experience with welding equipment is that a machine that can do it all does nothing particularly well. A dedicated single operation machine built for purpose lasts longer without hiccups. If you truly need one machine that can do it all then maybe it's ok to compromise the quality of each process,,,I guess.

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I have not had good experiences with multiprocess units. The one I used was a big Miller that did stick/tig/mig, and switching between the different modes was a pain. Also, if one mode goes down for some reason can you still use the other ones? I don't know, just asking. I like dedicated machines myself.

I have 4 MIGs 2 Lincoln, and 2 Miller along with 2 tigs, a Linde, and a Miller. Each one has its use.

I would sit down, and really look at the type of work you will be doing, then size the equipment to the jobs being done. Aluminum takes a lot of power so I use my Linde 350A tig or my 650A Miller mig. For sheetmetal my 120V 100A Lincoln mig does great, and the smaller gun fits into tight areas like when I am welding on a muffler under a car. Fit the welders to the job, and you will be much happier in the end.

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I have a miller XMT 304. I really like it and mainly use it for stick welding and tig. All I have to do is flip one lever. There's no solenoid on the machine so it's lift arc for the tig. I got used to it but it would be nice to have a pedal. I used to have a suitcase for mig that plugged right in but I don't really use that process too much so I sold it. The nice part is the thing is under fifty pounds and fits on the shelf, and at 300 plus amps, packs some power.

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Nuge, your XMT should take the standard Miller 14 pin pedal. We use them on all the XMT 304's we teach with at the tech school.  SSC sells a fairly nice pedal that fits all the Miller 14 pin equipment and also is a lot less expensive than the Miller models. If I hadn't managed to locate a nice used Miller pedal for my Maxstar 200, I was going to get one of the SSC pedals instead.

 

 There's no solenoid on the machine so it's lift arc for the tig.

 

Actually I think you mean that it doesn't have HF start, so you have to either do lift arc or scratch start with an XMT unless you add an HF unit to it. You are right it doesn't have a gas solenoid, but that means you need to use a torch with a manual gas valve to do tig. Being mostly used to my Syncrowave, it usually takes me a few times to get used to doing Tig with the XMT's again, especially after the summer. I'll usually forget to turn on the gas and fry the tungsten 3 or 4 times before I remember to turn it on 1st on a regular basis.

 

Great machines. I eventually want to replace my stand alone mig with one. I'm pretty well set with tig and stick with the machines I already have, but the XMT's are great in both of those as well.

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Yeah, no high freq. i have a smaller thermal arc 185 I use a lot more for tig but when I need more power the XMT is real nice. The only other gripe I would have, and it's a small one, is that the fan is on a lot, especially during the warm months.

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Along with my Miller 304 xmt I recently purchased TWECO 141I Fabricator 3 in 1 110V machine. It is made by Thermal Dynamics recently purchased by TWECO. I have been very pleased so far with the quality of this machine!

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