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My first RR Spike Knife


Frozenshrimp

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This is my first rr spike knife it took me 30 minutes to forge it and 6 1/2 hrs for grinding and sanding. It has some flaws but turned out pretty good for my first one.

 

Thanks for any comments and suggestions for future knife projects... 

 

frozenshrimp

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Very nice job of finishing!

 

The odd & looking rail clips can have twice the carbon content of a spike and so can actually be nicely heat treated.  Car coil and leaf spring can also make decent blades---also at twice the carbon content of a HC spike.

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Very nice work there. I agree with above post that recommends using High Carbon steel. Your work deserves to be put into something that has good knife qualities. HC spikes don't have enough carbon to do the job you want.....do yourself a favor and forge on good known steels......Your knives will thank you. Keep at it!

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Thanks guys for the kind words and the excellent advice. I have a ton of rr spikes but I'm working on getting my stock up of other metals, been able to get some that has been painted (from a old forklift cage) and don't know if I can use it and I'm sure I will have to strip the paint off before I can use it.

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If you can get some old files you can forge weld in a piece for the cutting edge.  Just remember how you heat treat will be different compared to HT'ing a RR spike.  You'll want to quench in oil vs. ice water and temper for a straw color vs. only tempering for stress relief.  RR spike knives are fun and they sell well because they're a novelty. 

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Late model cars and trucks used 5160 for leaf springs.....5160 will make a good knife. As well as coil springs.....most usually 1084ish.....will also make good knives. If you are unsure of your spring materials shop testing will determine it's worthiness as a knife steel. And I will gladly be paid to take anyone's leaf springs.......Just one opinion. ;)

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If you are used to working mild steel, spring will be a surprise as it is harder under the hammer and you do have to pay attention to not getting it too hot or forging it too cold.  Why I tell folks that "practicing" making blades with mild steel isn't! I suggest that people just starting on knife forging take a good auto coilspring and have it cut down opposing sides to produce a dozen "(" pieces and then they can forge a dozen blades from the same exact steel and learn how it works and then learn how to heat treat it and TEST the results.

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