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Has anyone built one, and do you find they work well? am seriously considering one, but looking for feedback from people who would actually use one.

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I built one.It works extremely well. I made mine pretty heavy duty, the anvil in 9" round bar, the base is 1.5" plate, the spring pack is brand new, and I added a flywheel with a flat belt clutch. The tup guide is bronze and adjustable. My hammer is not top heavy at all. It is extremely stable. I definitely think it is the easiest build, though I did a lot of lathe work, so if you don't have a lathe it may not be that easy. My hammer is 75 lbs and hits 240 times per minute. 

 

If I were to do it again,.I would do the same thing, again. 

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Google images has many pics of these style power hammers - let your fingers do the looking

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If you have the skills and resources to build an air hammer, I'd say go with that.  The guided helve hammer makes for a great, simple mechanical hammer, though, and with a tire clutch gives you good control.  

 

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James - I've seen your videos, your hammer hammer is impressive.

 

I'm hoping to build this year also. Still a little sketchy on some of the exact parts needed, I was going to buy the Rusty/Krusty plans, but have been told they were more like sketches, not detialed drawing with parts. I can figure most of the dimensions, that will be based around the materials I can obtain, but would like to know about some of the specific components... springs, bearing, pivots, etc.

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James - I've seen your videos, your hammer hammer is impressive.

 

I'm hoping to build this year also. Still a little sketchy on some of the exact parts needed, I was going to buy the Rusty/Krusty plans, but have been told they were more like sketches, not detialed drawing with parts. I can figure most of the dimensions, that will be based around the materials I can obtain, but would like to know about some of the specific components... springs, bearing, pivots, etc.

Buy Jerry's plans. They are cheap, plus he will answer phone questions which will give way more return than you spend. 

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Eddie - Thanks!  I picked the brains of folks who had already built theirs, let it distill, talked it over with my cousin who actually put the thing together for me (paying gig for him), tweaked a bit on the finished hammer, re-welded the tweaks that broke, and voila!  The only thing that I didn't see anyone else do already, I think, was the die-holding setup, and I think that my subconscious may have adapted it from some hydraulic presses I found online.  Basically, I took the time to do the video to let folks see what that distillation process had come up with.

 

At this point, the only major change I'd make to the setup is adjustment bolts on the ram guide to be able to take up any slop.  It's on my list of things to do down the road.

 

I was kind of absurdly pleased to come across a fellow at a knife show who makes (among other things) a lot of kitchen knives who had built a smaller version in his garage workshop after seeing my videos.  If I can pass along what I gained from other smiths and my own observations in a way that helps people build their own power hammers, I am happy.  :)

 

Someone asked recently about the clutch wheels' ratio.  The drive wheel is about 2 1/4" OD, and the spare tire is about 20" OD.

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Any pictures? Armand

There are a couple pictures of my hammer somewhere on here. I wouldn't know how to find them; sorry. 

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guess that settles it, i see a build coming in my future. most parts are available at Princess auto

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heres my first build of a rusty style hammer its been fun building the frame i have everything to build it except pillow block bearing and im trying to figure out how to make a linkage on the motor end and spring end because it has to befree spinning to rotate with thr motor spins if anybody can help with this let me know

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Hey Eggwelder,  thanks for bringing this up.  I see the rusty as being a poormans power hammer, compared to some of the others out there.  Poormans is the wrong term; less expensive/more affordable is more like it.  When I get the fund/time/materials, I too plan to go this route.  Storm, thanks for posting the vid.  mucho helpfulo. 

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heres my first build of a rusty style hammer its been fun building the frame i have everything to build it except pillow block bearing and im trying to figure out how to make a linkage on the motor end and spring end because it has to befree spinning to rotate with thr motor spins if anybody can help with this let me know

I used conveyor hanger bearings. Google them. They are similar to Heim joints except they are actual roller or ball bearings> There are a lot of different quality levels, buy good ones, they are doing a lot of work. I used a 1" turnbuckle for pitman arm adjustment and welded threaded studs onto the ends of the turnbuckle screws. The trick with conveyor hanger bearings is that they have tapered pipe threads,

So I used 3/4" bearings and turned a piece of cold finished shaft to the same O.D. as a 3/4" pipe, then threaded it with a pipe threader. There may be a simpler way, but this is pretty bullet proof. 

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Eddie - Thanks!  I picked the brains of folks who had already built theirs, let it distill, talked it over with my cousin who actually put the thing together for me (paying gig for him), tweaked a bit on the finished hammer, re-welded the tweaks that broke, and voila!  The only thing that I didn't see anyone else do already, I think, was the die-holding setup, and I think that my subconscious may have adapted it from some hydraulic presses I found online.  Basically, I took the time to do the video to let folks see what that distillation process had come up with.

 

At this point, the only major change I'd make to the setup is adjustment bolts on the ram guide to be able to take up any slop.  It's on my list of things to do down the road.

 

I was kind of absurdly pleased to come across a fellow at a knife show who makes (among other things) a lot of kitchen knives who had built a smaller version in his garage workshop after seeing my videos.  If I can pass along what I gained from other smiths and my own observations in a way that helps people build their own power hammers, I am happy.  :)

 

Someone asked recently about the clutch wheels' ratio.  The drive wheel is about 2 1/4" OD, and the spare tire is about 20" OD.

 

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Please tell me if I understand the math correctly, the with the drive to spare tire ratio of 2.25:20 you end up with a speed reduction of 1:8.888, or there abouts. Is that correct?

 

thanks

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Ummmm, looks like yes.  It doesn't hit as many beats per minute as a Little Giant, but it's more controllable and hits plenty hard.  Too much faster would be more than the spring could cycle effectively, I believe.  I'd rather take a few more heats and have more control over it.

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Stormcrow, 

 

Thanks for the verification, to quote Marv from "Sin City" "I got a condition" when it comes to math. Most people do not know but in reality dyslexia is broken down in to 3 sub-groups covering reading/ visual input (dyslexia), writing/spelling/other types of hand/manual output (dysgraphia) and math/computational input/output (dyscalculia). I have enough dysgraphia and dyscalculia that I stink at drawing, free handing with a jig saw and doing the math (most). Just because it was looking me in the face with a large sign saying "look at me, I am the right answer!!!!" does not mean I can trust it. Darn sneaky numbers! (LOL)

 

So I have this 3600 RPM 110 single phase that used to be part of a a belt drive table saw and even if I do not use if for a power hammer it should make a dandy (small) belt grinder. The motor has a 5/8" output on one side and a small (1/4") PTO coming off the other side. Two very nice things about this motor is it comes installed in a plastic housing (I can keep my ability to count to 10 with out taking off a shoe) and has a thermal reset switch so I am less likely to let the magic smoke out.

 

 

So I am going to try to run two belts with an (approximately) 7:1 then go for the spare tire (or something for the last 8/9:1. That should bring it to under (about) 240 beats per min. 

 

The ram is a 24# pto/drive shaft and (about) 90# worth of RR track and steel plate. I may sound like a heavy machine gun put I think it will work. 

I will worry about removable dies for the next build.  

 

What do you folks think?

 

post-35414-0-77293100-1409658749_thumb.p

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I built one...............

Bruno, 

 

First off I got to say that is a great bit of work. How many electrodes did you use in welding all that steel together?

 

Do you have any video of the hammer in operation?

I am trying to understand the physics of the hammer so if you do not mind would you please (if you know off hand) what is distance for a down stroke of the hammer and how many beats per min at a normal "cruising speed"?

 

 

thanks 

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heres my first build of a rusty style hammer its been fun building the frame i have everything to build it except pillow block bearing and im trying to figure out how to make a linkage on the motor end and spring end because it has to befree spinning to rotate with thr motor spins if anybody can help with this let me know

 

Hello Forgeman. 

I used 1" conveyor hanger bearings for each end of my pitman arm, with a 1" marine style turnbuckle for height adjustment (airspace between dies) The large turnbuckle allows me to dial the opening far enough to use top tools under the tup and still have full stroke. I also made my original setup with an 1.5" thick spacer plate under the bottom die, which I can remove if I need lots of height without throwing the hammer geometry out of whack. 

 

The thing about conveyor hanger bearings is that they are like heim joints so they are ideal for the purpose but the oddity is that they have a female pipe thread. 

Once I figured this out, it was a simple mater of turning a round bar to the correct O.D. and threading with a pipe die. I used a piece or 303 stainless steel for this purpose since it is extremely free-machining and pipe thread is tapered (i was worried about placing undue stress upon the die.)

 

Google conveyor bearing for a photo, I couldn't attach the image for some bizzare reason. 

 

Oops. I guess that's what you call a senior moment. 

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Stormcrow, 

 

Thanks for the verification, to quote Marv from "Sin City" "I got a condition" when it comes to math. Most people do not know but in reality dyslexia is broken down in to 3 sub-groups covering reading/ visual input (dyslexia), writing/spelling/other types of hand/manual output (dysgraphia) and math/computational input/output (dyscalculia). I have enough dysgraphia and dyscalculia that I stink at drawing, free handing with a jig saw and doing the math (most). Just because it was looking me in the face with a large sign saying "look at me, I am the right answer!!!!" does not mean I can trust it. Darn sneaky numbers! (LOL)

 

So I have this 3600 RPM 110 single phase that used to be part of a a belt drive table saw and even if I do not use if for a power hammer it should make a dandy (small) belt grinder. The motor has a 5/8" output on one side and a small (1/4") PTO coming off the other side. Two very nice things about this motor is it comes installed in a plastic housing (I can keep my ability to count to 10 with out taking off a shoe) and has a thermal reset switch so I am less likely to let the magic smoke out.

 

 

So I am going to try to run two belts with an (approximately) 7:1 then go for the spare tire (or something for the last 8/9:1. That should bring it to under (about) 240 beats per min. 

 

The ram is a 24# pto/drive shaft and (about) 90# worth of RR track and steel plate. I may sound like a heavy machine gun put I think it will work. 

I will worry about removable dies for the next build.  

 

What do you folks think?

 

Definitely save that motor for a belt grinder or whatever and use a 1725rpm motor for your hammer. the gearing will cost more than the correct motor and add unneeded parts to break etc. 

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Arftis,

 

Do you have any good places on line to look for a 1725 rpm motor? I could see about a dryer motor, I would think that should be in that speed range, what do you think?

I am also trying to build a non-reciprocating single blow air hammer on a lark since that sounds cool!

 

Ernest.

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I am also trying to build a non-reciprocating single blow air hammer on a lark since that sounds cool!

 

Ernest.

Search KA75.

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Wpearson, 

 

If I had the cash to drop I would get one of the  KA75 hammers, they look very neat! I think I have broken the shell on my poor little brain and not understand how thing work with the Zoller mod valve setup. If nothing else I can make some fun Halloween props.

 

Ernest 

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Ok I've been working on my hammer when i get a chance which hasn't been often but I've got it all ready to go except mounting the motor which I have . My question is I found a piece of square tubing METAL and it fit my ram perfect with barely a 1/16 of slop . So how long do you think this will last I plan on ordering uhmv plastic from mcmastercarr but until then I made the ram guide with grease fittings so maybe it won't be to harsh on the ram if I constantly grease it with high temp grease . Here are some pics please let me know and also after I make the dies there will be 6" between them is that enough to effectively forge hammers or drifts

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post-50135-0-35620000-1410650878_thumb.j

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If measured correctly as pushed hard to one side clamped top and bottom then the gap measured top and bottom. 1/16 = 1/32 or .032" per side. I have no mechanical hammer experience. So how close is close enough will be for experienced people to answer. The length of your tubing will also be a factor.

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