littlemilligan

alldays and onions on piece airhammer-anvil removal

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I have used wedges to force the anvil up but I cant move it much more. The hole were the drift goes has bitumen coming out in lumps but although the anvil has come up about half an inch nothing in the hole seems to change, i'm stumped ?  Any ideas on how the anvil can be removed from this hammer?

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Looks like it hasn't been apart for quite a long time. wiggle wiggle wiggle, push/pull, add a wedgie or eight. It will come, but not when you want it to. Have to keep reinforcing your thought, you will win. Patience Patience

 

Neil

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Thanks Neil, I've taken Moony's advice and given up, I'll put up with it bouncing for now, cheers anyway.

Interesting that this has had 103 people look at the post and you Neil were the only one with advice, good on ya.

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A wonderful looking hammer there. I think most of the lookers that did not post are folks from USA like myself, we're not lucky enough to have Alldays over here.

Good luck with the hammer

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Ive stripped those before,  A couple of little hydraulic jacks instead of those packers, maybe a bit of heat, and it will be out in 2 shakes of a lambs tail.

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If there is bitumen holding it in place, heat would seem to be an answer.  However I would want to be really careful to not heat any area up too much hotter than a neighbouring area or you could crack the casting. 

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A little heat from an un-concentrated torch head and a few taps around the edges with a wood mallet will loosen it significantly.

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hi collin ye  u might try a bit of warming it up     but if all else fail   keep hammering  

 moony 

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Yep most of us from the US can only say, "Lovely set of big fat dies on that hammer", and "she's a sexy little beast isn't she..." ;-)

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Can you add a bit of  bitumen solvent as you use the hammer? Let the solvent work, let the hammer shake things and let the solvent go deeper.  At some point it will come loose, just go slow so you do not break anything.

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I would raise the hammer about 100mm at a time(think the thickness of a railway sleeper) and pour about a cup of petrol around the anvil and let it stand overnight, the petrol should soften the bitumen and gravity should do the rest.

If that doesn't work reapply petrol and use a trucks bottle jack.

Obviously, When using the jack make sure that you support the base all the way round, bitumen has been known to well "stick like dog-do to a pick-nick blanket"

Good Luck with that! - Ian

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Thanks for that Bob, it is one of the few things on the net about working on alldays hammers.

I've started working on getting the faces flat and parallel, thanks Moony.

 And once again, thanks to all you good folks for the encouragement.

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Hello Colin

 

Been off the site for quite some time, shame on me

 

Did you get the hammer anvil free?

 

If not, you might find it is binding on a burr, or it needs to be spun about to allow for out of round

 

There used to be a large, tapered key fitted into the rectangular holes that go through both sides of the frame of the hammer and the mating rectangular hole in the anvil body. That anvil may be tapered at the bottom end, or it may have a square shoulder and a parallel spigot at the bottom end - you'll know if it is already apart and will know soon if not... The large tapered key was used to lock the anvil into the frame as, when it was driven into place, it bore down on the middle of the anvil against the lower surface of the rectangular hole and upwards on the hammer frame at each side in those rectangular holes. If the parts moved relative to each other a bit, and were left to rattle about, there could sometimes be some material movement which created a burr at the edges of the rectangular holes - all three holes that is. The result, the anvil might move a bit, but can't easily be removed. Hydraulics - hello John N - are a good way to keep the pressure on it, but be aware, the burrs may bind up very tightly and in a worst case scenario - from an over-zealous hydraulic application of force, 'bang', a cracked frame

 

Best to put it back in its hole and with a very bright inspection light check to see of there is anything in or around the rectangular holes preventing the anvil coming free easily. Long die grinder burrs may help get rid of any daggy nasties, otherwise you are in for some chiselling

 

If the anvil can be rotated whilst still in the hole, it may be easier to try this and see if it can be removed at different orientations. Sometimes there can be out of round interference too albeit with the anvil, frame or both - the hole in the hammer frame can be, all these years after they were made, oval slightly. You'd only need to miss that large tapered key once a year since c. 1930's to quilt the bejesus out of the hammer frame to the point that is will not release the anvil after all...

 

The most unlikely problem might be that it is to all intents riveted into the hammer frame. To check that we are talking inspection cameras up the wazoo with the hammer a little off the ground to try and see if there are any hammer marks on the bottom end of the anvil. That has been another issue I found with a hammer that had this sort of problem once upon a time. It had a separate anvil and tipping that upside down was fairly easy. Not so with your machine

 

Could be a fault in that casting too, a cast-in fault that is; I do know of that machine's interesting past experiences with Newtonian mechanics... So grateful Newton had an apple fall on his head, not a power hammer

 

Of course if that doesn't work, I'll give you five dollars for the hammer.... I can pick it up next week... please make sure it is clean...

 

Jim Deering

 

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Hello Colin

 

Been off the site for quite some time, shame on me

 

Did you get the hammer anvil free?

 

If not, you might find it is binding on a burr, or it needs to be spun about to allow for out of round

 

There used to be a large, tapered key fitted into the rectangular holes that go through both sides of the frame of the hammer and the mating rectangular hole in the anvil body. That anvil may be tapered at the bottom end, or it may have a square shoulder and a parallel spigot at the bottom end - you'll know if it is already apart and will know soon if not... The large tapered key was used to lock the anvil into the frame as, when it was driven into place, it bore down on the middle of the anvil against the lower surface of the rectangular hole and upwards on the hammer frame at each side in those rectangular holes. If the parts moved relative to each other a bit, and were left to rattle about, there could sometimes be some material movement which created a burr at the edges of the rectangular holes - all three holes that is. The result, the anvil might move a bit, but can't easily be removed. Hydraulics - hello John N - are a good way to keep the pressure on it, but be aware, the burrs may bind up very tightly and in a worst case scenario - from an over-zealous hydraulic application of force, 'bang', a cracked frame

 

Best to put it back in its hole and with a very bright inspection light check to see of there is anything in or around the rectangular holes preventing the anvil coming free easily. Long die grinder burrs may help get rid of any daggy nasties, otherwise you are in for some chiselling

 

If the anvil can be rotated whilst still in the hole, it may be easier to try this and see if it can be removed at different orientations. Sometimes there can be out of round interference too albeit with the anvil, frame or both - the hole in the hammer frame can be, all these years after they were made, oval slightly. You'd only need to miss that large tapered key once a year since c. 1930's to quilt the bejesus out of the hammer frame to the point that is will not release the anvil after all...

 

The most unlikely problem might be that it is to all intents riveted into the hammer frame. To check that we are talking inspection cameras up the wazoo with the hammer a little off the ground to try and see if there are any hammer marks on the bottom end of the anvil. That has been another issue I found with a hammer that had this sort of problem once upon a time. It had a separate anvil and tipping that upside down was fairly easy. Not so with your machine

 

Could be a fault in that casting too, a cast-in fault that is; I do know of that machine's interesting past experiences with Newtonian mechanics... So grateful Newton had an apple fall on his head, not a power hammer

 

Of course if that doesn't work, I'll give you five dollars for the hammer.... I can pick it up next week... please make sure it is clean...

 

Jim Deering

Thanks Jim, I think it's all over bar the shouting, and the anvil is once again sitting steady in the frame and the movement has stoped, cheers Col.

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hi col did making the face hit together help 

 moony

Hi Glen, yes the advice about the small bias towards the centre worked beautifully, thanks heaps. :rolleyes:

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good to hear all ok again  ,  ye its not always as it thinks it is ,  some times u have to go backwards to get forwards 

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good to hear all ok again  ,  ye its not always as it thinks it is ,  some times u have to go backwards to get forwards 

It's all good

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