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Thomas, I get it.. And I owe you an apology.. I'm a tad shell shocked on IFI and never sure if the question is legitimate or just a fishing expedition for an argument..

So, now it takes an large amount of fishing to figure out whether its on the level or not.. 

I'm only speaking for myself but saw both replies so figured I'd hit it from my angle..  

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Besides making blacksmithing anvils, F&N made many other products.  Vises, swage blocks, anvil stands, saw makers' anvils and many specialized anvils among them.  When I cleaned out Crossley Machine in 1999, I recovered several original swage block patterns.  The F&N Museum has one block matching a pattern.  Another block was identified in a western Pennsylvania shop matching a different pattern.  The pattern below is an original rectangular pattern, producing a block of 150 lb.  While fact checking my upcoming book, my daughter found a listing for this swage block for sale.  Upon inquiry, it was still available.  So off I went on a 200 mile ride to bring it home.  I brought the pattern with me to be sure it was a match.  Everything checked out, so into the trunk of my car it went.  Photo below was taken in the museum.  Just in time....this will be the final photo in my upcoming book.   It is always amazing to fill in the various holes in the facts of this great American company.

 

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  • 1 month later...

Proof copy of my upcoming book on the history of Fisher & Norris.  Available soon.  Waiting for the world to settle down to get it printed.

 

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Taking advantage of extra time home to clean up from my book work and set up a new display of interesting mostly Fisher items in the Museum.

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  • 2 months later...

My book, "The History of Fisher & Norris, Eagle Anvil Works" is now available to purchase. Click here.

Books and other posters and merchandise are available.  This book is the culmination of over twenty years of research that started when Richard Postman published "Anvils in America" in 1998.  The whole story of how all of this happened, the history of the company, people, products, technology and many anecdotes is included.   376 pages, full color, cloth bound hard cover, dust jacket.   Includes photos and images all all of the significant people involved in the business over almost 165 years.  I thank all that have an interest in the full, correct story of this great American company.

 

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wow, congrats.. 3 more days on mine.. :) 

Ok, so I was just looking at the last photo of the swage block patterns and anvils stacked up.. 

it just occurred to me, the anvils are stacked up and they all match so the feet fall in the middle of the face of the anvil below it. 

Were all anvils made this weigh for a given weight?  Or was it because Fisher could cast accurately enough to get good measurements?  I know the few Hay Budden anvils I have seen in the same weight class are not that accurate. 

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13 hours ago, jlpservicesinc said:

it just occurred to me, the anvils are stacked up and they all match so the feet fall in the middle of the face of the anvil below it. 

Were all anvils made this weigh for a given weight?  Or was it because Fisher could cast accurately enough to get good measurements?  I know the few Hay Budden anvils I have seen in the same weight class are not that accurate. 

I think what you are getting at is the heart of the difference between cast anvils made off of a pattern, and forged anvils that were essentially handmade by the hammermen.  I am impressed by the consistency of the product the forged anvil maker produced.  I can spot a HB anvil from 100 feet away!

 

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The 2and Gen Hay Budden is just so Hay Budden.  

Observationally and with applied deductions of my own skill sets it was amazing to see how the concept of a solid upper steel body with wrought iron feet applied via continuous forge welding methods of bars . 

Few realize that steel goes thru the whole anvil and the shape of the waist makes it all possible. 

Once you get up to a certain mass size you can continuously feed in wrought iron bars at welding temps with having to take a welding heat on the main section. 

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But boy I would not like to be one of the strikers on those welds on a hot humid summer day!  I've seen a picture of old time welding up of ship components where there were large piles of coke burning on the dirt floor of the factory with blowers blowing into it and the pieces being held by jib cranes. 

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All I have to say is "WOW"..  Got the book in yesterday and spent some time practically reading it cover to cover..  Fascinating story and Joshua did an amazing job on the book.. 

Well, done Sir.. Well done.. 

Definitely worthy of the purchase and anybody interested in Anvils and history of anvils this is a treasure. 

I like the layout of the book and is well thought out.. 

I'm already formulating a whole bunch of technical questions on the process.. :)

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  • 1 month later...

New addition to the Fisher & Norris Museum:  50 lb Fisher, no markings, made in the late 40s/early 50s.  This anvil has never been used.  Note the factory grind marks on the face.  Learn all about why this was not marked in my book on the History of Fisher & Norris.  Scroll up to find the link for ordering.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I was able to grab this one last night ( thanks Josh for answering my questions).  150 pounder that looks like it was barely used, but it does have two torch marks on the one edge.  A lifetime body shop man owned this since new and his daughter is selling all his tools.  He has dementia and the $$$ is going for his care.  When I talked to her she didn't know what kind it was, but the pic she sent I was pretty sure what it was.  I paid a fair price and it came with an all welded 130 pound stand. 

I brought it home and took it off the stand for transporting and set it next to my 103 pound 1900 Trenton.  

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The face is dead nuts flat and by my own measurements rebound is at 97-98%. 

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The only negative that I can see is the torch marks. 

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i am super excited for this anvil as I live in the burbs and the dead "ring" of the Fisher is great for my neighbors.  Can't wait to get the stand shortened by about 2 inches, rebolt it up and let er rip!

 

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