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Interesting new piece in the Fisher & Norris Factory Museum.  Probably early 1950s Fisher, 100 lb, made for US govt to military specs.  Olive green paint, no logo, no date, no FISHER. 

 

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This anvil is NOS.  The face is unmarked, edges perfect. 

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This is what factory new looks like.

Edited by njanvilman
Formatting better.
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njanvilman,

She's a beaut. Isn't new old stock great? 

JLP, yet another great find. I get the feeling it was used to produce a few specific things, or the smith who used to own it liked working in just a few spots. I'm glad you got another anvil for the teaching center. I hope your students realize the time, effort, and forethought you've invested in making your vision come to life. I hope to attend one day but who can say what the future holds? 

Pnut

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14 hours ago, JHCC said:

Interesting. I know that you usually strip the paint off any anvils that are going in the museum, but will you be keeping the military spec paint in this case?

I only take off ugly paint.  Original paint gets preserved always.

 

14 hours ago, pnut said:

njanvilman,

She's a beaut. Isn't new old stock great? 

This anvil is going into the Fisher & Norris Factory Museum.  We only teach the history of Fisher anvils here at the museum to interested guests.  And this is another interesting addition to my book on the story of all things Fisher & Norris, and Crossley.  Hopefully the book will be available in the spring 2020.

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Hopefully there will be lots of pics of the workers at task and the facilities. I agree the people's stories are fascinating and help a person get a more complete sense of the history behind the company, because after all a company is it's people. Can't wait hopefully I'll not have to wait till work picks back up to get it.

Pnut

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I love the back ground info as well.  I can't wait for the book to come out and have so many questions as to all aspects of the Fisher Norris company. 

when I was little I dreamed of visiting the place and getting one of their anvils..  LOL.. 

I love early production type videos.  It really is to bad that kind of thing never happened there or at other Anvil mfg places. 

Did Crossley machine make other products?   I have so many questions. 

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Crossley Machine Co, 1879 - 1999   There primary production were machines for all aspects of clay and ceramic production.  Trenton NJ had many large factories producing everything from sinks to electrical fixtures.  Crossley made all of the machinery they needed, or custom built machines if they did not have what the customer wanted.  Lots in the book....

 

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I don't want to take up your time but the questions are just popping. I'm trying to show restraint. 

So, did Crossley buy fisher to have more access to casting equipment? IE  to absorb the company?  Or were they really interested in Production of Fisher and Norris lines of tooling? 

If I don't show back up on this page. I literally have so many questions and I know our putting out the book and most if not all will be answered there.  I'm just so intrigued. 

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21 hours ago, jlpservicesinc said:

I don't want to take up your time but.....

F&N shut down  12/61 due to family reasons, but mostly because State of NU condemned two square blocks of Trenton to expand the parking and state buildings.  Everything in that area was destroyed.   Crossley had the foundry and was able to continue production of their products.  

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Interesting picture of a broken Fisher anvil.  Split right at the hardy hole.  Examining the break shows the anvil had very poor quality iron.  It was bound to break at some point.  It is unusual to have the broken piece together with the anvil.  The small piece is usually lost.IMG_0938.thumb.JPG.57e5a88444d662bbc1d339feaeb95d0a.JPG

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43 minutes ago, jlpservicesinc said:

Is that the one you got from Alan C.? 

No, that is a different one.  This one came on a Fisher stand.  I bought the two just for the stand.  The stand now has a 100 FARS Fisher anvil on it.  This anvil is just a curiosity now.  

I might JB weld it together, paint it, and incorporate it into a brick wall or a gate.  Just thinking of possible uses in the future.

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I'm with JHCC on this one.. Not only is it unique to have the fitting pieces but  maybe if you stand it up on the horn and put the tail section back on it will stay.  You can then talk about how the cross section of the fishers are made.  I mean face thickenss to body and the way the core was for the hardie hole. 

that poor anvil, looks like it was beat to death just over the area of the hardie hole.  Could just be the photo. 

Ok, I have to ask. I've seen maybe 10 FN and I have seen very consistently there is a crown to the steel plate to body.   it looks like the edges are thicker than the center section of the face plate.   These were supposed to be made out of W1.   Where they forged and then sheared and punched to size?  Then cooled, cleaned (pickeled or ground) then preheated before they went into the mold?   I would have loved to have seen the process done. 

Here is an example on a 200lbs but every one I have seen of the newer style has this same faceplate profile from 100lbs up to 500lbs. 

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jlp.....I explain the process as well as I can interpret what was done in my book, along with factory photos.  It would take a long time to explain it all.  My book will be done soon, printed, and ready by the ABANA event near Saratoga in June.  Hope to meet you then.

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