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Hello everyone. I'm knew to the world of bladesmithing, and just felt that I needed to introduce myself.

 

As of right now I'm in the planning stages of everything. Researching books, techniques, sketching plans my starter forge. All that fun stuff. 

 

I decided to come here first because bladesmithing is really my ultimate goal with working the forge. The end result is weapons grade replicas of video game and movie swords/knives/armor. Along with my own custom knives. I honestly prefer knives to swords. More practical in modern times.

 

Anyway I'll pop in from time to time with questions, and try to share what ever I learn on the way.

 

 

As it sets right now, I have nothing but blueprints and a dream. So since I'm on a budget I won't be posting any of my work for at least a few months while I get myself set up.

 

My first project however will be a Scottish Dirk. I'm thinking 1095CV steel with a plain ebony handle and scabbard. Like pictured (although I think that's a leather handle and scabbard)

 

Anyway It was good meeting you all. 

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Starter Forge---does this mean you do not have blacksmithing experience yet?  The fastest way between starting and producing good blades is to learn the basics throughly---hammer control, how metal moves, what temperatures to work at and what temperatures NOT to work at, etc. And then to move up to blade forging.  Spending 5 hours mindfully making S hooks could save you 20 hours filing or discarding poorly hammered blades.

 

Also a Saturday working with a smith who knows what they are doing can say you *MONTHS* of trying to figure it out trial and error.  And then again spending some time with a bladesmith when you are ready to go to the next level to teach you how differently high carbon steel is worked.

 

If you are around my neck of the desert let me know and we can work out a shop visit sometime.

 

And I must say it might be easier to turn a battleship into a space ship than make a "working" version of many of the videogame weapons.

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I have no forging experience what so ever, but I'm not fooled by my ambitions. 

 

The dirk is going be my first blade for its simplicity. Before I even begin on to form my first blade though my goal is realistic. Study proper techniques. I have severe social anxiety issues and so I'd really prefer to go in this alone and not look for actual shop time with anyone. The last thing anyone needs is a guy having a panic attack while surrounded by glowing hot metal.

 

Before I start any actual projects I plan to work with scrap metal and focus on different techniques I'll need. This will be compared to extensive research. Watching videos of others while they work and mimicking them the best I can. Even recording myself and comparing my techniques to those of the more experienced.

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I decided to come here first because bladesmithing is really my ultimate goal with working the forge. The end result is weapons grade replicas of video game and movie swords/knives/armor. Along with my own custom knives. I honestly prefer knives to swords. More practical in modern times.

 A few issues, most of the video game baldes can not exist as a functional blade in the real world, so there is no real way to get  a "weapons grade"  fantasy sword from most of them, but you can have fun trying. Some of the movie things can work.  but in either case, you cant re-sell the replica's.  A replica of the copyrighted items can only be made for yourself.  You will figure most of thsi out by yourself by time you get to where you have the skills to make swords.

 

You mentioned starting smaller an that is good, bu why choose 1095CV,  when you have not forged anything yet.  Its jumping ahead a bit, (dont feel bad about it tho,  I did it too way back when).   We have some only line classes reposted here, and there is a lot of basic forging to be learned before you get there. Much of that is here also, but if you insist on doing it all with out any one on one help, you have an up hill battle.  You are best to find a way to get out of the house and join a group if you are serious about learning. You can not realy learn this stuff alone.

 

good luck

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It's going to be a few years, before I make anything to sell, but good tip on the copyright laws. The last thing I want is to have a lawsuit.

 

When I say first project, I mean the first thing I make as the stepping stone to where I want to be. Everything before that is going to be training for myself. Working with scrap metals and low end steels on stuff that I just intend to throw away after I can't use it any more since they're just for training and practice purposes. I'll honestly make the same knife a thousand times with junk metals before I use high end steel.

 

Thanks for pointing out the online classes here. I'll definitely be checking those out when I have more time too.

 

 

When I say weapons grade, I mean using high end steels to forge them. I know there's no way a lot of the stuff from games (and even movies) can actually be used in real life, but I've some pretty wicked metal working come from forges, so I don't see it as impossible to make the high end steel replicas of these items, even if it takes years or even decades. I'm really just doing this for my own amusement than anything else so time limits to build the right skills are not a priority.

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It's going to be a few years, before I make anything to sell, but good tip on the copyright laws. The last thing I want is to have a lawsuit.

 

When I say first project, I mean the first thing I make as the stepping stone to where I want to be. Everything before that is going to be training for myself. Working with scrap metals and low end steels on stuff that I just intend to throw away after I can't use it any more since they're just for training and practice purposes. I'll honestly make the same knife a thousand times with junk metals before I use high end steel.

 

Thanks for pointing out the online classes here. I'll definitely be checking those out when I have more time too.

 

 

When I say weapons grade, I mean using high end steels to forge them. I know there's no way a lot of the stuff from games (and even movies) can actually be used in real life, but I've some pretty wicked metal working come from forges, so I don't see it as impossible to make the high end steel replicas of these items, even if it takes years or even decades. I'm really just doing this for my own amusement than anything else so time limits to build the right skills are not a priority.

Why would one use high end materials to make a non functional or poorly designed piece?  I think when you do finally get the chance you find that wasting your time, money and energy on anything less than trying to make the best is a waist of time.  While the dirk looks simple, double edged blades are complex to make.  Go through the tutorials, and if possible find an experienced smith nearby that would be willing to show you some stuff.  A couple of hours with an experienced smith will save years of doing it wrong.

Good luck.

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It's a state of mind really. I guess it's one of those things that I couldn't explain in a way that makes sense to anybody but myself. 

 

So the dirk might not be the best first stepping stone? Fair enough, I'll scratch that idea for now and rethink it when I get closer to that point.

 

 

An experienced smith to train under would be great, but not practical for someone in my situation. I've stated before that I have severe social anxiety issues. Even in a one on one I have panic attacks which could make for a really dangerous work environment. Maybe sometime down the road I'll overcome that issue, but for now I'd just prefer to see how far I can go on my own.

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Welcome to the Skyforge (nice Daedric armor). I sympathize with your desire to be self-taught, it's how I started; the difference is you found IFI way before I did. From personal experience I can say that you have to read and read again - had I known/researched bladesmithing books/forums existed before I made my first several blades they would be functional, rather than wall-hangers. In fact, I only know that they are display pieces and would fail if used because of IFI and books. I'd like to think I've gotten better, largely due to IFI.

Didja play the ESO beta?

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Yeah this site definitely seems like a great resource to keep on hand. I've already learned a little today that surprised me lol.

 

Skyrim is actually the only ESO game I've played as of yet. Not much of an online gamer to be honest. Do play BF3 from time to time though.

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Working iron can teach a lesson.  It doesn't want to move.  It doesn't like the heat.  The iron protest being struck.  It doesn't know what it can be.  With a masters touch the iron becomes a thing of beauty. 

A lot of 'smiths have problems being around people.  I think that is part of the allure, it just requires one.  That being said, I was self taught.  I had no one to show me anything. 

True story, I sold a gentleman a starter anvil.  As part of the deal I gave him a tutorial that took an hour.  In that hour I showed him how to do something it took me 3 years to figure out.  Books are great but there's nothing like seeing it first hand. 

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Post your location so anybody on ifi that lives near you might be able to help. Join your local blacksmithing group because you'll learn 10 times faster all the basics of moving steal, marketing, networking and all things else smithing related ( gotta learn how to work some non ferrous metals right? ). Learn the basics till you can do them in your sleep then move on to basic blades ( gotta crawl before you walk and walk before you run). Check out sca and ren fairs and pick the local smiths brains. Oh and if you have a chance to help another Smith out in his shop, even if he's never forged a blade in his life, jump on the opportunity. Sorry if my rightings kinda jumbled but I'm righting this off a pc of crud phone. Good luck with turning dreams into goals and goals into a living

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As a practicing physician assistant, I would suggest that you address you social phobias now rather than later.  If you outright admit that you can;t even work one on one with another person without fear of bad things happening, this has now become your life priority.. This type of phobia must be sequestered before you can move on and lead a safe and productive life.  Go see a counselor or continue if you are....this needs to be addressed because whether you work for yourself in your own business or for another person, you must become comfortable with one on one coping skills.  Just my opinion from a medical standpoint.

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Well just having *one* person in a smithy is historically as accurate as going into a modern cardiac surgery suite and having only the surgeon there.  Except for the fairly recent times when old smiths were riding the craft down to retirement or death as there was no longer enough work to support the shop as previously run and they were too old or fixed in their ways to change.  (The powerhammer, AKA "the Smart Apprentice", also helped...)

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