Gerald Boggs

Twisted bracelets

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Here's a couple of Bracelets I recently did.  I had an order for two, did four, sent the best two out.  These are the rejects.

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Those are some purty looking rejects. I like them. Lol now I have to try to match the quality of your rejects when I make some. Good thing you didn't show the good ones. Whew.

 

Rashelle

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Thanks all, these are actually pretty easy to do.  Copper is great, as is mokume gane.  So many cools ideas to try, so little time :-(

 

Oh! and I'll still sell these, but at the Farmer's Market.  That's what I do with the extras from orders.  On the subject of selling from a photo, there's always a little stress from trying to duplicate the work.  Much easier to sell face to face.

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OK, you have me hooked. What size stock did you start with? It looks like maybe 5/16"

Did the twisting make some of the peaks higher, or did you vee the stock deep first? It is a little tough to tell in the pic, as some areas look flatter than others. Suspect that some selected cooling may have to be done to keep the twists nice and neat.

Did you have to make a thin twisting wrench , or just use a standard one? Of course, it would depend on how big they are.

Not sure what it is about these, but they have me fired up to get out to the anvil this weekend. Lots of possible designs.

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Sorry for the delay, next weekend :-)

 

I used 1/4 cold rolled.
I was going for a wrist size of 7 1/2 inches
I gave myself about 1 1/4 inch on each end with the twists layout at 1/2 spacing for the left one and 5/8 for the other. 
Before I did the twists, I chiseled lines down the center of each side.
Horizontal in a vice, used a torch to heat each section in turn.  Twist was 180 degrees and I used a small adjustable wrench.
Yes, in between each heat, I cooled with water.  You don't need a lot of heat, dull orange is fine.
Forge out the ends and trim as necessary.

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Thanks for the reply!

In did an experimental one last weekend out of a busted 5/16 brazed tool bit from work. Using a torch to do localized heating would help on the smaller stock. I did notice the heat went away very fast on these thin sections. I did a simple series of full twists. I have been wearing it for the last few days to refine the shape. I noticed how even a tiny area can provide an uncomfortable pressure point. Did some polishing today, and it feels a lot better.

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I like those. Looked like a good project for the boss. But when i showed it to her...well she liked it, but her comment was to make ball-ends instead of mini-scrolls to avoid hooking on sweaters and such. She works in jewelry retail, so fwiw.

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I'll try one in 1/4" stock. For a guy the 5/16" is about right. The quick experimental one I did has gotten some interest from different friends down in the Arts District. Once my hand fully heals I will need to make some nice ones. Got 8 stitches last Thursday after running my hand across a razor sharp carbide form drill.

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Very graceful rejects! If you don't mind my asking, how long do these take you to make and what do you charge for them? I'm constantly trying to get that balance right!

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I've got about 30 minutes in each one.  I do them several at a time and that reduces the per piece time quite a bit.  Right now, I'm selling for $45 each.  Price has so many variables, location being the biggest.  If it was with mokume gane, $300.  My next step in jewelry making.
 

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Gerald, are you planning to incise and reverse twist the Mokume version the same way you did the iron ones or go for a more traditional patterned approach?  very interested to see what you put out in that field, I am always on the lookout for new information in that field :) what metals are you thinking about working with?

 

love the design, and ill echo the others and say that those are some pretty impressive rejects :) your end scrolls look to be tight enough to not be overly catchy on loose clothing, but the potential is still there so putting a ball end or some other ending flair that doesn't have any deep V's in it would be an attractive selling point.  once you get making mokume down you could make some little beads from your ends and cutoffs and drill/solder patterned beads onto your iron versions to spice them up even more :)

 

looking forward to pics of the next batch!

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At this point, I'm open to all ideas.  First I need to get a bar of mokume gane made.  I'll likely do the same as with most ideas, start simple and progress to a point where I like the results.  Here's a bit of what I'm talking about: The beginning, then down the line the last.  In between, a bunch of variations   All sell and all fun to make.

 

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Very nice pendants.

This is giving me some ideas for what I call the yoga crowd. What price range do you find moves the best?

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There really isn't a best price range, it's a best location/market.   What I sell here for $25, I couldn't sell for $10 at a Mountain Man Rendezvous.  At the other end, if I was willing to go to one of the DC Saturday markets, I could sell the same for $50+ 
 

Also, are you marketing to the deliberate Shopper (Someone looking for that "Perfect Something") or the impulse buyer? 

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We have several locations, and events around the Las Vegas valley that I could move something like this. I also have a local gallery out in DaBoonies where I live that showcases local artists. These are small enough, and fast enough to make that a few could be knocked out in a good weekend. I also have access to a large amount of small stock from work at scrap prices.

As to price, I was just wondering if you had experienced the Wal-Mart effect IE; I can get whatever it is at WM for less. I have seen this with pottery especially. Some people just have no concept of a handmade item. If I were you I'd be hitting the DC markets, you do really nice work.

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The people that shop at Walmart don't come to the farmer's market.  Farmer's market shoppers are looking for Local, Handcrafted, Organic, Sustainable, Etc.  My stuff fits right in :-) The same for the nicer craft shows. 

To more directly answer the price question: I find for impulse buyers, $25 is a easy price for them.  The deliberate buyer will still buy the troll cross and such, but that's who buys the higher priced work.

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