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I thought you guys might like to see this. I recently acquired a new anvil with an 1 1/4" hardie hole and didn't have any tools for it. I decided to make a hot cut from H13. The only thing I could find that was big enough was a piece of 2".  I decided to give it a try and see what happened I ended up with a nice functioning tool. It doesn't look that pretty and it got a little crooked on me but it works like a champ. The hammer is short handled 10lb sledge that I used to do most of the work. I hurt so bad the next day I didn't know if it was worth it or not then I used it to cut  some steel today and I forgot how much it hurt already!

 

 

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That's one way to learn respect when someone else build's something. There is no short-cut. "To finish, first you must start". :) :)

 

Neil

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Nice looking hardy Zachary. What do you mean it got crooked? All I see is a carefully calculated and crafted differentially curved edge so a smith can perform highly precise cuts in an efficient manner. All the high end hardies are made like that. <wink>

 

Not to be a semantic jerk but the tool IS the hardy and there are only two bottom tools properly called a hardy, "hot" and "cold" hardies. Everything else is a bottom tool though things like bending forks and bics may have a different name.

 

Well done.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I need to get somebody to teach me how to keep the blade square with the hardy shank. I saw it happening when I was about half done and tried to straighten it but no luck. Til I was done I hurt so bad I no longer cared as long as it worked!

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Not to worry if your hardie seems "crooked". I use one that is squared to the anvil, either direction. Another is skewed about 30-45 degrees, and comes in handy when the work piece has a bend in it.

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Heat it up, put it in the hardy hole then use a smooth jaw twisting wrench to twist it where you want it.
It looks good to me

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