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Using the new induction forge more and more as I get used to having it in the shop.

I know LESS than nothing about graphite crucibles but I am in the market for a couple of them. I would like them to be straight sided, about 3 inches tall and have an inside diameter of .95 inch.

Has anyone a source for them?

Can I buy a block of graphite and make my own hole of does it take special tooling?

ANY info would be much appreciated :)

Dave

 

 

 

 

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Using the new induction forge more and more as I get used to having it in the shop.

I know LESS than nothing about graphite crucibles but I am in the market for a couple of them. I would like them to be straight sided, about 3 inches tall and have an inside diameter of .95 inch.

Has anyone a source for them?

Can I buy a block of graphite and make my own hole of does it take special tooling?

ANY info would be much appreciated :)

Dave

 

I'll ask my metalhead and caster buddies and get back. and yeah you should be able to buy graphite blocks and I don't think it'll take special tooling, a HS drill bit should do just fine, think pencil lead.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Try ebay for something in the 1/2 Kg/ 15 Troy Oz range to suit electric furnaces.

 

The price will make you wince, but I priced up 2kg crucibles over here in the UK and they worked out cheaper than I could buy the graphite rod to make them.

 

The only time I ever tried machining graphite, albeit in a home workshop, the mess it made was enough to put me off doing it again.

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Good deal Dave. I didn't check my email soon enough. It' can be darned hard to beat this gang to the helpful punch. <grin>

 

The first tips I got were to try Riogrande and http://www.budgetcastingsupply.com/Crucibles.php. Mc Master Carr carries graphite blocks.

 

This morning there are quite a few more places to check but seems the IFI gang has it in hand.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I am constantly amazed at how complex commerce has become. Seems like every time I try to buy something that I think will be simple....

Turns out that graphite comes in myriad grades and in varying temperature ratings and hardness ratings.

 

I am experimenting with my new induction forge trying all kinds of new [for me] stuff. While reading about coin mokume I found a fella that was making quarter mokume in a graphite crucible that was just the teensiest (?) bit larger than a standard US quarter.

 

I made several tools to hold the quarters for heating in my gas forge and the results were spotty. Made 4 'billets' and tried many techniques also with spotty results. I am working on a 'plate' style holder more like the sheet mokume folks use.

 

In the meantime I thought I would buy a crucible and try that. First thing I did was contact this fella using the crucible to find out where I could buy a crucible like his that fit the quarters. He chose not to answer me, so off to Google and then this thread.

 

I now have one on it's way so my search is currently over.

 

I am interested in using some of the mokume for knife guards. I also want to try melting some copper and/or brass for guard material and eventually learning to pour the moltem brass / copper in place on the knife.

 

Thanks to everyone for helping me locate a 'simple' graphite crucible :)

Dave

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I don't know much about induction forges, will heating and melting brass in one make it hard to forge weld steel in it? I've been told it does in a gas forge.

nonsense on  both parts.  Forging copper things will not ruin a forge. and induction forges usually do not even contact the item being heated.

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would it be cost effective (or even possible) to make your own disposable clay graphite crucibles? Maybe slip-coat the inside chamber with something to get a few more heats out of them?

 

I have used an arbor press to mold slightly moist porous materials then bisc fired it in a kiln for a couple of jobs where I needed ceramic parts. I'm pretty sure I gently mixed the powders then steamed the mixture in a bucket (lid on) before loading the mold.... 50 times :wacko: ended up with 35 good ones from the batch. It may not work with graphite powder, alumina oxide and clay, graphite is pretty slippery stuff.

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Don't take it personally Jammer, the whole poisoning a forge is a long running myth and we can get a little snippy when we hear it again. Cut Steve a little slack, being part of the admin on this site is a major PITA and it gets to the guys.

 

Among the long running myths you hear spoken with great authority besides poisoning the forge is you just can NOT weld in a propane forge, especially a naturally aspirated gas forge. Not only will my naturally aspirated (no blower) forge weld, there's a little puddle of melted 3,000f hard fire brick under the burner is it's running for an hour or so. A properly adjusted naturally aspirated gas forge does NOT automatically scale up the work either. HOT steel WILL scale on contact with air.

 

Anyhow, go ahead and ask your questions but if you read the sections on the site related to what you want to do you'll get a LOT fewer grumpy old farts being grumpy. Just remember to drag up a comfy chair, pack a lunch and something to drink, there are days worth of reading.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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