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I Forge Iron

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Greetings Glenn,

 

Thanx for the wonderful post....  I loved it ..    Not only the forging but for sure the line shaft driven machines in the back ground...   As I recall you where a safety inspector...   You would have to throw the book at  those old boys...    Ahhh it was another time in history...

 

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim

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The sad part is the comment that those guys could make more money than $1.25/hr pushing a broom. Although we were never wealthy when I was growing up, my dad was making $600 a month in 1963 working at a gas refinery - so I guess ax making by hand smithing was a dying trade even then. Too bad those companies couldn't manage their way out of the bad times but like the narrator said, their skills were taken for granted.

An interesting thing I noticed was that they encased the cutting edge over the core rather than insert it inside the cleft. Seems mildly countertuitive since high carbon welds at a lower temp than low carbon. I would think they might have trouble with burning but I bet they had good control over that oil fired forge.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Any thoughts on what they were quenching in?  I've never seen a quench tank with all that deposition built up around it.  If it was a cleaning tank, what were they cleaning the metal with that required it to be hot?  

 

OSHA and the EPA must have had a field day with an operation like this.  No safety guards on those hammers, smoking on the the job, no gloves, face masks, heat shields or....  I love it!

 

Could an operation like that exist today?  Not a chance.

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Thanks for posting. I'll pass that along to other I know who will like it.

 

 

I love that old shear. There's an old railway freight station/ grain yard that has been turned into a contractors supply near me that has an almost identical shear in the yard they use for shearing bundles of rebar. I've always thought that old shear was sort of neat.

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Thank you for sharing that video Glenn.  As sad as it is to think about what's been lost, it's fortunate that the forging & making of these axes was captured on film.  A real treasure!  At least when we fire our forges and put hammer to steel, at least in some part we're keeping that memory alive.

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