Black Frog

Steel and copper lampshade

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I was asked to "come up with something unique" for a lampshade using steel and copper.
16" diameter with a 4" top opening. About 9" height.

Hammered steel panels flame treated for color, and copper accent pieces with copper rivets. I'm still experimenting with the flame coloring of the copper sections, learning more as I go. But I'm quite happy with the colors in the steel. I wanted the transition of colors to spread out to near the edges.
No two are the same, but they make for a nice collection. I left four rivets out so that I can install the top shade support that hangs on the harp of the lamp.

Choosing the base for this lamp this is not my job.

shade1.jpg


shade2.jpg

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Greetings Frog,

 

Pretty slick shade...  Flame coloring when 2 metals are attached is a challenge...  You might try a controlled heating and cooling process...  Heat with the torch and set the color with a compressed air cool blast...    This just goes to prove what I already expected ... You are a shady fellow... LOL

 

Forge on and make MORE beautiful things

Jim

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Jim,
On some parts I had a spray bottle mister of water which provided some interesting cooling effects. Nice thing is, flame coloring like this is easy to start over with. Just a bit of time with a wire cup brush and you have a clean slate to try it again.... Getting better now with each attempt. :)

I'm reading more on the flame copper treatment with spritzing different things on the copper during heating yields some very cool results...

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Very cool shade! I have played around with heat patina on steel shades. You can get great colors!

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Now to figure out a base for this lamp... I had been thinking of making some sort of hammered steel base, but that might be a bit much of that look for one piece.

 

I was asking opinions around, and seeing what people think the base for this lamp shade should be. 

Opinions were ALL OVER the map as to what "would work" and what wouldn't.

 

I think the best idea I've heard mentioned is a translucent blue glass lamp base.

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that looks awesome frog!  to my eye I would go with something that resembles the aft end of a jet fighter (or at least the same type of form, some long clean angles, matte finish, etc), as the shade strikes me as a well used thrust nozzle from a jet engine :)

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How about something similar but leave off the backing pieces and install a small night light fitting inside to give either the main light or a night light trickling through the gaps.

 

For real bling do cutouts in the uprights and use mica sheet to cover them on the inside with a light on the inside

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Another absolutely fantastic work! I am looking forward to seeing the base of the lamp. You're quite creative.

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Nice shade Frogman. It impresses me as having a Victorian industrial flavor. A more or less industrial stand might go well, say a Tripod you might see on older survey instruments. The legs could be stained wood, cherry or similar with Copper or Brass fittings and the shade on a cantilever.

 

It's a nice enough shade to leave the options wide open for a stand.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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thats a lovely sculptural object black frog! - really like it :)  i keep looking at it :)

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Very steampunk, especially if you continue the theme with the base.  Very nice work.  Once again, I made the mistake of showing it to my wife.  And once again, another project for me to do for her.

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Thanks for the nice comments!

 

If you are thinking about something similar, be aware it is more work than it looks like....

80 hand installed rivets require 160 accurately placed holes so everything lines up.

 

The eight individual panels are not trapezoids with flat bottoms.  The bottoms of the panels have the appropriate radius to give the desired 16" diameter circle when assembled.

I used a 3D modelling program to figure out the correct pattern and radius, but you could do it the old fashioned way too. 

Make a mock-up cone out of paper, slice it down the side and "uncurl" it to find out the correct radius that makes your final shape.

 

This is what a 16" diameter shade with 4" top hole and about 8.5" of height looks like when it is "uncurled" and flat:

post-25745-0-02489600-1382016413_thumb.j

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