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The anvil appears to say:

 

___ (some first name)

HADFIELD

LATE

HADFIELD &

SANDERSON

WARRANTED (or SHEFFIELD)

 

The term LATE is seen on English anvils when the maker recently began making anvils under their own name and formerly worked at a well known anvil company. I believe the same could be if they took over the company and were transitioning to putting their own name on the anvils. I've seen Sanderson Brothers, and at least one of the type you have, there seem to be several versions as the business owners evolved, HADFIELD & SANDERSON being the most common of the bunch.

 

In any case, you picked up an "Old English" style built up anvil, likely made in Sheffield, England, a little before 1850, where Hadfield & Sanderson were. The name on yours is fairly rare. Please post a picture if you clean it up and find more letters.

 

Enjoy!

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I will. I am terribly disappointed that it is so damaged, but hope to get some use out of it. would you just wire brush the rust around the letters attempting to find more or do you think that will simply harm the ones that can be seen. Honestly I am very impressed you were able to read that much from so few letters. The most I could make out was late and Sanderson.

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Deffinatly has the all the shape characteristics of sheffield anvils, have you tried sprinkling some flour on the lettering and wiping the excess off with a towel, this can highlight the the depressions and give contrast, make them easier to read/ guess at ?  Great find.  I might put a wrench to the bolt and see if it will  turn (left), perhaps some tapping from the bottom in combination with turning will free it if it is mechanicaly, stuck, if its rust, soak it with JB80 for a day or two, just suggestions to try befroe resorting to a big hammer or heat.

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Hand brush away, you won't hurt it with a hand wire brush. A wire wheel on an angle grinder will strip it down to bare metal, I don't think you want to do that.

 

Agree with woodsmith, try to turn it or drive it out with something close to the same diameter (don't mushroom it further). If still stuck, try some penetrating oil. If it still won't budge, drill through the center of the bolt to weaken it and give it another go. Good luck, a lot of times they just pop right out with a little encouragment.

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I lived in Columbus OH for 15 years and it truely was "the happy hunting grounds" for blacksmithing stuff; I luckily bulked up and when I moved to the blacksmithing tool desert of NM I was sitting pretty. 

 

I've lived on the east coast too (NJ, VA, NY) and in AR and OK and so have an idea of those areas markets. 

 

I've never seen a place with more and cheaper anvils than OH; also postvises, etc...  Ohio had a very nice mix of farming and industry both of which used anvils and both did pretty well meaning that stuff generally didn't get worn past usability but repaired or replaced.  I still remember being at the fleamarket and being ready to pay US$25 for a nice complete 4" post vise and getting dragged away by a friend to tell me "Don't pay $25 for it or he will want $25 for all his postvises!"  $20 was acceptable to both the dealer and my friend...

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I agree with thomas, I am born and raised in Ohio, have lived in the south and have returned so I know two regions. Last damaged anvil I sold was missing the heel, english style 125 pounds and I had to work hard to get $75 out of it in ohio.

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Good luck with that one Ronin, there is nothing here to vacation to! On a side note I did try to extract the old bolt from the anvil.... no go. Did not budge. Any other ideas? Considering drilling a hole through the bolt and trying an easy out, but dont have much hope for that working either.

post-12133-0-88137500-1373480695_thumb.j

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If you're confident in your drilling skills I personally would just drill the head off and punch it through. Of course that's what I do for a living so I might be a bit biased on that. A good cobalt drill bit, and a nice pneumatic drill would make easy work of that old bolt. If you do plan on drilling it, just remember to go with very slow rpm (600 to 800) with a lot of down force on it. Should come out beautifully.

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  • 8 months later...

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