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poleframer

Jim Rich passed on today

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I don't know if anyone here knew him, he was a talented smith who lived in Takilma Oregon, I knew him at a distance for many years, tho I did get called to chase down his horse a time or two when I lived in takilma.

He was a blacksmith for Pirates of the Caribbean, he set up the blacksmith shop in the movie, and forged many of the knives used in it.

He was also a tall ship sailor, and crewed on the Lady Washington. As well as a founding member of the Jefferson Baroque Orchestra, and many more praiseworthy accomplishments.

I was looking at the Hay Budden anvil in my shop that came from him, I'm glad I'll be pounding hot iron on it for years to come.

Prayers for his family, and bon voyage to a great blacksmith.

 

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WOW !! + Very Sad on the news :mellow: I meet Jim when I started smithing @ one of are local Jefferson Smith Hammer Ins twice
he was the wheel wright guy & A great smith ,He has earned his place @ the forge an Anvil AS MANY ! others HAVE *
* think about it -- Hmm a bunch of pasted smiths trying to LOL out due them self's :D LOL


YES there are many here that knew him ! I think He was one of the ones with the first group's of the Northern Ca Jefferson Smith
MY Prayers go to his family & my anvil will ring tomorrow

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I didn't now him but I'll say a few words for him and ring my anvil.

 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Jim was a true renaissance man.  I mean that literally and figuratively.  The guy could play at least a dozen baroque instruments, pound red hot iron, and I swear to you- wore period clothing for 40 years.  

 

During that entire time, I can't remember ever seeing him mad.  Not to say that he never was, but instead that he was virtually always cheerful, which is pretty impressive when you think about it.  If you visited him at random, you would find him happily tapping on a harpsichord or happily building some new item.  I appreciated his patience- especially when he humored me as I tried to build a hot tub using wagon wheel rings as a young kid.  

 

I can't remember when I first met Jim.  I may have been 2 or 3 years old.  Back in the day, he had a madrigal singing group with my mom and several others.  He will be sorely missed by the hundreds, well thousands of people he knew and befriended.  He is survived by a happy and successful family and many friends.  Jim would want you to toast him onto the next adventure, so please give him a final thought.  Bon Voyage Jim!  

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Well :) HIT IT HOT & RUN with it was one of Jim things :wub:  I wish I had taken the time to go to his shop :( 1-1/2 HR  away

never got there :( now to late !! I meet Jim 3 time's He was one of those  that made smithing seam  easy / yea right ! LOL :wacko:

 

Poleframer or Arin I was ask by some of the old Jefferson smiths that don't do computer & knew Rich if anyone had a phone No# or address to send a card ???   you can post here or send to me

 

[email protected] & I will tell them Thanks !

 

Poleframer ck Iforgeiron mail

Arin where you from ? Crescent City Ca here

As Jim would say Hit Hot & Run with it and see where it takes you :D

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Guest Moderator52

Prayer lifted for his family and friends.

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Jim lived on an Arabian ranch, next door to our farm in the late 1970's. He had no electricity and since his shop was open, in winter time he would get very very cold. Once during a walk, I encouraged him to come over and hang around in our always warm living room, to warm up.
After this we became friends and I did a 3 week 'workshop' with him in 1979. We got along so famously and I loved the work so much that it wound up I became his apprentice for a year and a day. He gave  me his cabin at the forge, to live in and I swung a sledge for him when needed. My main duty though, was to drive him to shoe horses, as he did not own a rig. I remember that year as laughing all the time. He would not teach, but always made sure I knew when he was going to be 'making something' and so I either watched or swung in time. He always yelled don;t hold your breath. We could really move iron together.

That year we forged out a giant pair of 3" wide elephant toe nail nippers, made a wagon, ironed wagon wheels & hosted a blacksmith conference with our buddy Al Bart. He really had the art of hand forging down pat when I knew him, and he enjoyed a life style that really suited him from clew to earring. 
He and I shared the same sense of humor and in reading (Patty O'Brian) , and music.

I am still in the business working every day, and am still grateful for what I learned in that year.
 

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